Deploying Enterprise Apps | Introducing Windows 8

In this video we'll cover how to take your Line of Business (LOB) apps and deploy them with your Enterprise. We'll talk through your options that you have for getting your app directly to your users. And the implication of those options to both you as the developer, the IT administrator in the Enterprise, and your users.

For more information on deploying your apps, please see the following reference links:

Attitudes towards Flooding Risks in Vietnam: Implications for Insurance
By: UP Los Baños Presentation by Dr. Pham Khanh Nam, Senior Economist, EEPSEA and Deputy Dean, Faculty of Development Economics, University of Economics, Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. Delivered during the International Conference on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation for Food and Environmental Security, November 21-22, 2012 at SEARCA, UPLB, College, Laguna, Philippines.
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Strengthening Capability of State Universities on Vulnerability Assessment to Enhance their Role in
By: UP Los Baños Presentation by Dr. Amparo M. Wagan, University Extension Specialist, University of the Philippines Los Banos, Philippines. Delivered during the International Conference on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation for Food and Environmental Security, November 21-22, 2012 at SEARCA, UPLB, College, Laguna, Philippines.
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2.3 What does relationship mean in systematics? G.G. Simpson

Activity 2

0 hours 5 minutes

Dr. Patterson continues to look at Simpson’s answer to the meaning of ‘relationship’ in systematics, and illustrates this by referring to a diagrams showing how the
Author(s): The Open University

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1.4 Grades and clades

If species are grouped together because they show a similar extent of accumulated anagenetic change with respect to their ancestors, then the taxa so formed constitute grades. In Figure 1, morphological change is represented along the horizontal axis. The three columns show grades of anagenetic modification, with pa
Author(s): The Open University

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1.4 Molecular substances

Chlorine, bromine and iodine belong to a family of elements called the halogens. At room temperature, chlorine (Figure 2e) is a gas, bromine (Figure 2d) is a li
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Dominique Strauss-Kahn released
July 1 - Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the former head of the IMF, was released on his own recognizance as a sexual assault case against him falls apart. Conway G. Gittens reports.
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1.3 Designing alternative programmes and curricula

Assuming that both the content of mathematics and the processes need to be included in programmes and curricula, the problem becomes one of how a suitable curriculum can be structured. One possibility is to construct a very specific curriculum with clearly defined objectives for both content and processes separately, and possibly with suggested learning activities. However, content and process are two complementary ways of viewing the subject.

An alternative is to see the curriculum in
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3.4 Databases

At a basic level, a database is a collection of information which can be searched. It is a way of storing, indexing, organising and retrieving information. You may have created one yourself to keep track of your references – or your friends' names and addresses. They are useful for finding articles on a topic, and can be used to search for many different types of information.

You may find some of the following databases useful for your topic. They contain different types of informatio
Author(s): The Open University

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6.4.5 Complexity

The final concept, discussed in Case Study 3, is the complexity of interactions between society, technology and environment, illustrated by Figure 14. A simple technical fix to a problem, such as the introduction of a harmless gas (Freon), or a new predator (the Cane Toad), can have many unintended out
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3.2 (2B): Developing a relational model of the Powerdown Show programme

In this activity you will be challenged to reinterpret the following programme extracted from the Powerdown Show DVD: Energy Descent Pathways. The reason this programme was selected, from the many audio-visual programmes currently available online that tackle environmental and social issues, was because it presents an "ecotopian" approach to tackling the converging social, economic and environmental crises. Your challen
Author(s): The Open University

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4.6 P is for Provenance

The provenance of a piece of information (i.e. who produced it? where did it come from?) may provide another useful clue to its reliability. It represents the 'credentials' of a piece of information that support its status and perceived value. It is therefore very important to be able to identify the author, sponsoring body or source of your information.

Why is this important?

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1.4 Evaluating information

How well does the following statement describe your approach to evaluating the information that you use?

When I come across a new piece of information (e.g. a website, newspaper article) I consider the quality of the information, and based on that I decide whether or not to use it.

  • 5 – This is an excellent match; this is exactly what I do


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Introduction

The internet provides a world of information, but how do you find what you are looking for? This unit will help you discover the meaning of information quality and teach you how to evaluate the material you come across in your study of technology. You will learn how to plan your searches effectively and be able to experiment with some of the key resources in this area.

This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course Author(s): The Open University

Acknowledgements

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Reading 1 was prepared by Andy Lane with contributions from Christopher Mabey, Sally Caird, Mike Iles, Elizabeth McMillan, Rob Paton,
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4.2 When and where was the telephone invented?

I'd read in the past that the telephone was invented in 1876 by Alexander Graham Bell. However when I looked more closely at the history it turns out that the idea had been ‘in the air’ for almost half a century.

The distance communication technology of the time, the telegraph, was based on sending pulses of electricity along a wire to control an electromagnet at the receiving end. The sender completed an electric circuit by pressing a key and the receiver's electromagnet controlled
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2.6 Books and the internet as sources

Finally, let's come back to the different types of modern sources as indicated in Figure 1. Many of these types are familiar to you in one way or another, so we can be brief. The course A219 uses set books that students registered with the Open University are required to purchase. Three of them are clearly modern schol
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2.4.1 The theological persepective

If we are thinking about individual perspectives on religion, there are three very common and useful terms we can employ: theism, atheism and agnosticism. In everyday parlance, ‘theism’ denotes a belief in God (or, more broadly, a belief in divine or spiritual realities); ‘atheism’ denotes a conviction that there is no God (or divine or spiritual realities); and ‘agnosticism’ indicates a lack of certainty or knowledge (gnosis) one way or the other. Very broadly speaking, these per
Author(s): The Open University

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Acknowledgements

Prepared for the Course Team by Simon Buckingham Shum

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Tables

Tables 3.1 and
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