2.8 References for Extract 1

Banks, S. (2001) Ethics and Values in Social Work, 2nd edn, London, BASW/Macmillan.

British Association of Social Workers (BASW) (2002) Code of Ethics for Social Work, BASW,

Dalrymple, J. and Burke, B. (1995) Anti Oppressive Practice and the Law, Buckingham, Open University Press.

Howe, D. (1999) ‘Values in Social Work’ in Davies, M., Howe, D. and Kohli, R. Assessing Competence and
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2.5 Component 3: Skills

We all have considerable skills that we develop as we go through life. Many of them are so familiar to us that we probably don't think about them. For example, the reading skill which you are using right now is a highly complex and sophisticated one which took years to develop to this level. Our approach to skills is again to provide you with a framework to help with your learning and understanding.

We use four categories of skill in our framework:


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2.4.3 Ethics and accountability

Ethics is one aspect of values. One way of understanding ethics is in terms of the resolution of professional moral dilemmas. Social workers frequently play an important part in resolving such moral dilemmas, for example when making decisions involving risk, protection and restriction of liberty. The way in which you act in these situations should be guided by something beyond your personal beliefs alone. You have to be aware of the publicly stated values of your agency and make skilful judge
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2.4.2 What are social work values?

Traditionally, one of the things that distinguishes a profession is that it has a set of principles to which its members have to be committed and must put into practice. Sarah Banks defines social work values as:

a set of fundamental moral/ethical principles to which social workers are/should be committed.

(Banks, 2001, p. 6)

The British Association of Social Workers issued a revised C
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2.4.1 Social work values

You will have come across the Code of Practice for Social Care Workers when you looked at the Framework documents for your country. These Codes are the main documents relating to values in the framework documents. Before looking in detail at the different aspects of the code, it is helpful to look at what ‘values’ are, where they come from, and the context in which social work values have arisen and are being put into practice.


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2.3.3 Law

Another very broad area of knowledge is law. Social workers’ roles are bound by the law, even those who do not work for statutory organisations like social services. The law sets out what social workers’ duties and powers are, what they must do (a duty) and what they are permitted to do (a power). For example, social workers employed by statutory and voluntary agencies are bound by law relating to human rights and discrimination.

You will find many other pieces of legislation in add
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2.3.1 Aspects of knowledge in social work

In the Aids to Practice cards you will see that there are 18 Knowledge cards presented in alphabetical order. Most of the cards relate to a specific approach to social work or theory about how to practise. While these cards are very useful prompts and reminders, they are not intended to provide a template of what you need to know without additional reading and support. For example, some of the information is extremely broad, such as the cards on Social Policy, Sociology and Psychology; these
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2.2 The four components of good practice

Developing a knowledge base is only one aspect of learning. The knowledge you acquire will be assessed by the way in which you apply it to practice situations through your written work. Your practice and your reflections upon knowledge will be guided by your understanding and application of the four components of good practice: knowledge, skills, values and ethics, and the social work process.

The Aids to Practice cards in this unit are organised under the headings of the four componen
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2.1 Introduction

The four components of good practice are introduced here and you will find references to them throughout your practice learning. The four components are:

  • Knowledge

  • Skills

  • Values and Ethics

  • The Social Work Process.

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1. Approaches to social work

This unit introduces you to social work practice, and you will consider the meaning of ‘social work values’ as well as the different approaches to social work and the skills involved.

It is expected that your learning will involve reflection on what you have learnt, including time spent thinking about how knowledge, skills and values relate to social work practice.

This unit provides opportunities to apply theoretical learning to practice which makes the difference between
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • develop awareness of the underpinning knowledge relating to the key roles of social work;

  • illustrate the application of knowledge, skills, values and processes through case study examples;

  • demonstrate awareness of the skills required to build relationships with service users, colleagues and others through effective communication;

  • introduce the social work service standards and codes of p
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Introduction

Ever wondered what social workers do? This brief introduction gives you some insight into social work practice and the theory which informs the practice. This unit is made up of a series of six extracts. You are introduced to the four components to good practice and will look at the importance of the following approaches to social work practice:

  • Biography

  • The social context of social work

  • Responding to children’s needs
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References

American College of Sports Medicine (2006) ACSM's Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription (7th edn), London, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.
Pollock, M.L., Gaesser, G.A., Butcher, J.D., Després, J.P., Dishman, R.K., Franklin, B.A. and Ewing Garber, C. (1998) ‘ACSM position stand: The recommended quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness,
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1.2.2 Reviewing the research: how people understand ‘health’

Being a contested concept, ‘health’ is constantly being redefined and re-evaluated. Lay people do not necessarily accept biomedical definitions of health and illness uncritically. Instead they have a complex web of beliefs, constructs and understandings about health and illness. These inform people's health behaviour, including decisions about whether to self-manage, seek help within local or lay networks, or consult a health professional.

Some lay people regard health as the absenc
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1.5.9 Plagiarism

Referencing is not only useful as a way of sharing information, but also as a means of ensuring that due credit is given to other people’s work. In the electronic information age, it is easy to copy and paste from journal articles and web pages into your own work. But if you do use someone else’s work, you should acknowledge the source by giving a correct reference.

Taking someone's work and not indicating where you took it from is termed plagiarism and is regarded as an infringemen
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1.4.7 T is for Timeliness

The date when information was produced or published can be an important aspect of quality. This is not quite as simple as saying that 'good' information has to be up to date.

Activity

Here is an example of a news item from an onli
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1.4.6 P is for Provenance

The provenance of a piece of information (i.e. who produced it? where did it come from?) may provide another useful clue to its reliability. It represents the 'credentials' of a piece of information that support its status and perceived value. It is therefore very important to be able to identify the author, sponsoring body or source of your information.

Why is this important?

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1.4.4 O is for Objectivity

One of the characteristics of ‘good’ information is that it should be balanced and present both sides of an argument or issue. This way the reader is left to weigh up the evidence and make a decision. In reality, we recognise that no information is truly objective.

This means that the onus is on you, the reader, to develop a critical awareness of the positions represented in what you read, and to take account of this when you interpret the information. In some cases, authors may be
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1.4.3 R is for Relevance

Relevance is an important factor to consider when you are evaluating information. It isn’t so much a property of the information itself but of the relationship it has with your question or your ‘information need’. For example, if you are writing an essay about obesity in the United States, a book or website about health problems in Australasia would probably not be relevant. So there are a number of ways in which a piece of information may not be relevant to your query:

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