IDS/BBC World Service Trust, 'Fragile States and the Media'
The role of a free media in underpinning democratic development is consistently highlighted in much development literature, however, little research attention has been paid to why communication matters, how and under what conditions the media’s effect is felt on development outcomes. Furthermore, the role of an increasingly fragmented media in fractured and fragile states is particularly poorly understood, especially in relation to conflict and marginalisation. With this picture as the bac
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Introduction

Do you want to get more out of drama? This unit is designed to develop the analytical skills you need for a more in-depth study of literary plays. You will learn about dialogue, stage directions, blank verse, dramatic structure and conventions and aspects of performance.

It's not necessary for you to have previously read any of the plays mentioned in the unit before embarking on it, but to get the most from it you may like to obtain texts of the following:

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9.3 Mental health practice: Bonnyrigg
This unit is intended to be of interest not only to people living in Scotland but to anyone wishing to know more about Scottish society and culture. It brings together a collection of free educational resources relevant to Scotland. The resources within this unit cover a wide range of subject areas, including education, environment, technology, history, law, literature, politics, social care and social sciences.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.6 Oil industry in Scotland
This unit is intended to be of interest not only to people living in Scotland but to anyone wishing to know more about Scottish society and culture. It brings together a collection of free educational resources relevant to Scotland. The resources within this unit cover a wide range of subject areas, including education, environment, technology, history, law, literature, politics, social care and social sciences.
Author(s): The Open University

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The East Side story: How executive uncertainty created an accession conditionality that never was
A presentation given by Research Fellow Cristina Parau at Wolfson College on February 24th 2009. Dr Parau is also a member of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies in Oxford. Europeanization scholars study the impact of the European Union (EU) on domestic politics. The literature on the impact of the EU on the domestic politics of accession countries in Eastern Europe has focussed too narrowly on the formal conditions for accession to the EU stemming from Brussels. Accession conditionality and the
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1.3.3 Stage 1: Preparation

The task here is very different from our task when faced with numbers, where we need to deal with a high level of abstraction. Writing is often dense and multi-layered, and usually gives us, if anything, too much surface information about our subject. We need to make a mental effort this time in selecting and abstracting information ourselves. In order to do this effectively we need to be aware of the context of the writing. We need to check if we can, for instance, the political and s
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1.2.3 Stage 1: Preparation

Numbers and diagrams are highly abstract and condensed summaries of the world. They require a degree of mental effort to bridge the gap between them and the aspects of the ‘real’ world they stand for. Approach them slowly and with care, allowing yourself time to get the feel of what you are looking at. Don't assume you already know what you are looking at.

1.2.1 What evidence are we reading?

Although we live in a society where a huge amount of information is available in the form of numbers, some of us still feel a mental fog descend when we are asked to deal with them. This is because numerical information is information in a very condensed and abstract form. A number on its own means very little. You have to learn to read it. Numeracy (the ability to work with numbers) is a skill that we can learn. It is a very useful skill, because it allows us to understand very quickly the <
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4.1 Understanding the relationship between data and space
Cars have sat nav systems, mobile phones use GPS: maps are important in everyday life whether captured by aerial photography, satellite imagery or simply drawn. This unit looks at how we read and evaluate the information in maps and assesses the values embedded within them. From mental maps to public transport and street maps: how do they affect your life?
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3.3 Maps and the modern world
Cars have sat nav systems, mobile phones use GPS: maps are important in everyday life whether captured by aerial photography, satellite imagery or simply drawn. This unit looks at how we read and evaluate the information in maps and assesses the values embedded within them. From mental maps to public transport and street maps: how do they affect your life?
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Mental maps
Cars have sat nav systems, mobile phones use GPS: maps are important in everyday life whether captured by aerial photography, satellite imagery or simply drawn. This unit looks at how we read and evaluate the information in maps and assesses the values embedded within them. From mental maps to public transport and street maps: how do they affect your life?
Author(s): The Open University

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2.1 How do we use maps?
Cars have sat nav systems, mobile phones use GPS: maps are important in everyday life whether captured by aerial photography, satellite imagery or simply drawn. This unit looks at how we read and evaluate the information in maps and assesses the values embedded within them. From mental maps to public transport and street maps: how do they affect your life?
Author(s): The Open University

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6 One hundred possibilities
What do you think being creative means? This unit engages with the debates surrounding the term ‘creativity’ and explores ways in which ICT creates new opportunities for creativity and collaborative working. The unit would be of interest to teachers, parents and carers, and can be studied on an individual basis or as part of a school-based training session.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 Introduction
What do you think being creative means? This unit engages with the debates surrounding the term ‘creativity’ and explores ways in which ICT creates new opportunities for creativity and collaborative working. The unit would be of interest to teachers, parents and carers, and can be studied on an individual basis or as part of a school-based training session.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Influences on creativity
What do you think being creative means? This unit engages with the debates surrounding the term ‘creativity’ and explores ways in which ICT creates new opportunities for creativity and collaborative working. The unit would be of interest to teachers, parents and carers, and can be studied on an individual basis or as part of a school-based training session.
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

The activities in this unit are designed to support an individual or group of teachers in preparing a school-based training session for colleagues on creativity and information and communications technology (ICT) in the curriculum.

References

DEA/GA (2004) The Global Dimension: Geography, London, Development Education Association.
Goudie, A. (1993) ‘Schools and Universities – the great divide’, Geography 78(4), pp. 338–9.
Gritzner, C. (2004) ‘The Geographic “Mental Map”: Can “anyone” (really) teach geography?’, Journal of Geography 103, pp. 43
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4.3 Beyond resilience?
What do we mean by ‘wellbeing’ for young people? How is it shaped by social differences and inequalities, and how can we improve young people's mental and physical health? This unit will examine the range of factors affecting young people’s wellbeing, such as obesity, binge drinking, depression and behavioural problems.
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The limits of primary care
In this unit we explore questions of access to community services. To make what might be quite a dry task more challenging we use a fictionalised case study of two people for whom access to community services is particularly problematic. Jim and Marianne are both long-term heroin addicts. Additional problems associated with their addiction are homelessness and physical illness. Their situation raises both practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about entitle
Author(s): The Open University

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1.4 Service users' views: What services?
Frontline managers are responsible for gathering service user views on their needs. Whose views should be taken into account? How do managers gather views? This unit helps you consider ways of getting feedback from service users, and shows the inclusive approach of a manager of a voluntary sector mental health service.
Author(s): The Open University

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