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Teaching with Primary Sources
This film defines primary and secondary sources and explores the value of using primary sources in instruction. For transcript, captions, and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=6632
Author(s): No creator set

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CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)
An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games.
Author(s): Fernandez-Vara, Clara,Rusch, Doris,Juul, Jesper,Ta

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

How probability can help you control your destiny
Full story: http://bit.ly/1KWXS5Y A dramatic tale of plane crashes and poisonous berries – and you get to choose the ending. If you didn't think you need to understand probability before, you will now Option 1: Stick with first choice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhanfdtCUEo Option 2: Switch to other option https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNKAW9mhkiE
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Art from War: Documenting Devastation/Realizing Restoration
Larson Fellow Tara Tappert discusses how different artistic approaches to the experiences of war trauma can be traced to the devastations of the First World War. For transcript, captions, and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=6638
Author(s): No creator set

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Race & the Broadway Musical
Warren Hoffman discusses the role of race in American musical theater. Speaker Biography: Warren Hoffman is a program director, producer, theater critic and playwright. For transcript, captions, and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=6639
Author(s): No creator set

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Global Business Strategy and Standardization & Intellectual Property
Activities of research and industry related to environment and energy are required to expand their targets to global market. The course gives overview of current status and subjects of global business strategy in the field of feature applications such as communication, railroad, automobile and materials and financial activity, and also gives case studies of standards and intellectual property in the real global business. Students experience mutual negotiation by roll-play to lead standardization
Author(s): TOKYO TECH OCW

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Rights not set

1.3.3 Feeling safe and secure in school

As we noted above, children place importance on feeling safe and secure. This desire could be used as an argument both in favour of and against inclusive education. It is a fundamental characteristic of most conceptualizations of inclusive schools that they are places where all children can feel secure about being themselves. Opponents of inclusion might argue, though, that a fundamental problem in mixing children together is that they may be exposed to situations where they feel and experien
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2.4 Different classrooms, different experiences

The inclusive classroom is one that provides for the learning of a diverse range of children. The pupils in the above example were in streamed secondary education. The 1997 White Paper on education (DfEE, 1997) supported the policy of streaming by attainment in primary schools. Doug McAvoy, a former leader of a teaching union, interpreted this as ‘setting is good and mixed ability is bad’ (McAvoy, 1997, cited in Lyle, 1999). The practice of setting is endorsed through the National Literac
Author(s): The Open University

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Virtual Maths, Shapes, Space and Measure, Tan Table
Calculate the height of a building, Tan Table
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

7.6 Questions

Question 15

Suppose that a galaxy has emission lines in its optical spectrum. A line of wavelength 654.3 nm is broadened by 2.0 nm. Estimate the velocity dispersion of the gas giving rise to the broadened spectral line. Is it likely to
Author(s): The Open University

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13 Post-compulsory science education

In a speech to the Institute of Economic Affairs in 2001, the then UK Secretary of State for Education said:

Young people choosing vocational study will be able to see a ladder of progression that gives structure, purpose and expectation to their lives, in the same way that a future pathway is clear to those who leave school to gain academic A-levels and enter university. Over-16s in full-time education will be abl
Author(s): The Open University

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4 Who is science education for?

Our focus so far on defining the nature of science raises an equally problematic question – why teach the nature of science? That begs a yet more fundamental question about the purpose of science education overall, which is worth exploring in detail. The sociologist Harry Collins laments present practice:

We teach science for the benefit of potential scientists rather than to enable the vast majority of those who
Author(s): The Open University

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3.1.6 (F) Creativity

Pupils should appreciate that science is an activity that involves creativity and imagination as much as many other human activities and that some scientific ideas are enormous intellectual achievements. Scientists, as much as any other profession, are passionate and they (and their work) rely on inspiration and imagination.

Author(s): The Open University

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3.3.1 Try some yourself

1 Look at the diagram below and answer the following questions:

  • (a) Write down the coordinates of the points P, Q, R, S and T.

  • (b) On this diagram,
    Author(s): The Open University

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5.3 Emergency planning as a formal requirement

Several pieces of legislation make the preparation of emergency plans a statutory requirement. The European Directive on the control of major accident hazards (Council of the European Union, 1996a), the ‘Seveso II Directive’, outlines the planning requirements for industrial sites with large inventories of hazardous substances. In the UK, the requirements of this directive have been incorporated into the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations (Health and Safety Executive, 1999a). I
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Early anti-Jewish policies in the Nazi government

Hitler's government was sworn in on 30 January 1933. On 28 March all Nazi Party organisations were urged to carry out a boycott of Jewish businesses and professionals on 1 April. The exhortation came from ‘the Party Leadership’ and claimed that the boycott was in response to the lies spread in the foreign press by Jewish emigrants; in reality, though, it was an attempt to impose some discipline on the freelance, anti-Semitic vandalism and violence of Nazi activists (especially the SA) in
Author(s): The Open University

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2 Nazi ideology and anti-Jewish policies

Anti-Semitism was central to Hitler's world view and to that of most Nazi activists. Hitler considered Jews to have been foremost among profiteers and racketeers during World War I; they engineered the ‘stab in the back’ of November 1918; they were hand-in-glove with Bolshevism. In August 1919 Hitler was an instructor at a military camp at Lechfeld, near Augsburg. His task was to inject nationalist and anti-Bolshevik ideas into the men in the camp, many of whom were recently released pris
Author(s): The Open University

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8 Voice

Is the speaker in a poem one and the same as the writer? Stop and consider this for a few moments. Can you think of any poems you have read where a writer has created a character, or persona, whose voice we hear when we read?

Wordsworth's The Prelude was written as an autobiographical poem, but there are many instances where it is obvious that poet and persona are different. Charlotte Mew's poem, ‘The Farmer's Bride’ (1916) begins like this:

Author(s): The Open University

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2.5 Is the author dead?

When Roland Barthes (1915–80) wrote ‘The Death of the Author’ (first published 1968, reprinted in Barthes 1977), he did not mean that, like Wimsatt and Beardsley, the author had been, or should always have been, absent in the interpretation of art works. Instead his position is a historicised one: while once it might have been acceptable to refer to the author in the interpretation of an art work, now, in a post-modern world, it is not. Michel Foucault (1926–84) responded to Barthes (
Author(s): The Open University

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