4.1 Introduction
In the 18th and 19th century evolutionary biologists, including Darwin, emphasised the similarities between natural evolution and artificial ‘ improvement’ of livestock under domestication. They believed that studying domesticated animals and plants could illuminate the mechanisms of natural evolution.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 The origins of domesticated dogs
In the 18th and 19th century evolutionary biologists, including Darwin, emphasised the similarities between natural evolution and artificial ‘ improvement’ of livestock under domestication. They believed that studying domesticated animals and plants could illuminate the mechanisms of natural evolution.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Size and shape
In the 18th and 19th century evolutionary biologists, including Darwin, emphasised the similarities between natural evolution and artificial ‘ improvement’ of livestock under domestication. They believed that studying domesticated animals and plants could illuminate the mechanisms of natural evolution.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Artificial selection
In the 18th and 19th century evolutionary biologists, including Darwin, emphasised the similarities between natural evolution and artificial ‘ improvement’ of livestock under domestication. They believed that studying domesticated animals and plants could illuminate the mechanisms of natural evolution.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.1 Introduction
In the 18th and 19th century evolutionary biologists, including Darwin, emphasised the similarities between natural evolution and artificial ‘ improvement’ of livestock under domestication. They believed that studying domesticated animals and plants could illuminate the mechanisms of natural evolution.
Author(s): The Open University

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Evolution through natural selection
In this unit, we describe the theory of evolution by natural selection as proposed by Charles Darwin in his book, first published in 1859, On The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. We will look at natural selection as Darwin did, taking inheritance for granted, but ignoring the mechanisms underlying it.
Author(s): The Open University

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Evolution: artificial selection and domestication
In the 18th and 19th century evolutionary biologists, including Darwin, emphasised the similarities between natural evolution and artificial ‘ improvement’ of livestock under domestication. They believed that studying domesticated animals and plants could illuminate the mechanisms of natural evolution.
Author(s): The Open University

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Lecture 24 - 11/17/2010
Lecture 24
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Darwin Reconsidered: Darwin on Nature and God
Part of a series of lectures organised by the Oxford Centre for Christianity and Culture discussing the religious and philosophical implications of Darwin's Theory of Evolution. Part of Darwin 200, celebrating the 200th anniversary of Darwin's Birth.
Author(s): John Hedley Brooke

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Darwin Reconsidered: Cognitive Evolution and Religion
Part of a series of lectures organised by the Oxford Centre for Christianity and Culture discussing the religious and philosophical implications of Darwin's Theory of Evolution. Part of Darwin 200, celebrating the 200th anniversary of Darwin's Birth.
Author(s): Justin Barrett

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Darwin Reconsidered: Darwin and Secularism
Part of a series of lectures organised by the Oxford Centre for Christianity and Culture discussing the religious and philosophical implications of Darwin's Theory of Evolution. Part of Darwin 200, celebrating the 200th anniversary of Darwin's Birth.
Author(s): John Lennox

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Darwin Reconsidered: Christ and Evolution as Theodrama
Part of a series of lectures organised by the Oxford Centre for Christianity and Culture discussing the religious and philosophical implications of Darwin's Theory of Evolution. Part of Darwin 200, celebrating the 200th anniversary of Darwin's Birth. Please note: the recording of the lecture ends 2 minutes before the end of the lecture itself.
Author(s): Celia Deane-Drummond

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Learning outcomes
In the 18th and 19th century evolutionary biologists, including Darwin, emphasised the similarities between natural evolution and artificial ‘ improvement’ of livestock under domestication. They believed that studying domesticated animals and plants could illuminate the mechanisms of natural evolution.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Lecture 24 - 11/17/2010
Lecture 24
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Lecture 24 - 11/17/2010
Lecture 24
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Lecture 24 - 11/17/2010
Lecture 24
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Darwin goes on the web to confront critics: His complete works on-line
A website has been launched containing the largest collection of Darwin's writings ever assembled. This site contains every Darwin publication as well as many of his handwritten manuscripts. All told there are more than 50,000 searchable text pages and 40,000 images.
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Darwin and Love
McGill celebrates Darwin Day and Valentine's Day with this special presentation by Dr. David Green, the director of Redpath Museum, on courtship and sexual selection in a range of species.
Author(s): No creator set

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Introduction
In this unit, we describe the theory of evolution by natural selection as proposed by Charles Darwin in his book, first published in 1859, On The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. We will look at natural selection as Darwin did, taking inheritance for granted, but ignoring the mechanisms underlying it.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

2.1 Introduction
In the 18th and 19th century evolutionary biologists, including Darwin, emphasised the similarities between natural evolution and artificial ‘ improvement’ of livestock under domestication. They believed that studying domesticated animals and plants could illuminate the mechanisms of natural evolution.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

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