Coastal Clash: Defining Public Property and the History of the Public Trust Doctrine
"Coastal Clash" is a one-hour documentary focusing on the urbanization of California's coastline. The activities and lesson plans for the film "Coastal Clash" target students at the high school level and align with the California State Standards for Government. In this lesson plan, students will do research and group work related to the concept of the Public Trust Doctrine.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Frames Within Frames: Perspectives on Native-American Heritage
In this lesson, students are given the opportunity to focus on the variety of responses the film Return of Navajo Boy evokes as they create their own "film within a film," learn about cultural expression, and engage in discussion and reflective writing activities.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Living Between Two Worlds
In this lesson, students will explore issues common to all families. They will examine school, work and conflict in their lives and the lives of the family profiled in the film. They will have an opportunity to role-play solutions to school conflicts based on a series of vignettes.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Multiple Perspectives on the Immigrant Experience
In this lesson, students will reflect on the individual Dominican-American experiences of the Ortiz sisters in the film My American Girls, create a talk show that addresses the themes and issues of the film, and conduct research on how Latinos are portrayed in the media.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Defying Genocide
This collection of activities and resources is a companion guide for the 15-minute film Defying genocide. The history of the Holocaust and the 1994 Rwandan genocide illustrate the entire spectrum of human behavior, from unimaginable evil to extraordinary goodness. Through a study of the Holocaust, Rwanda, and genocide, students learn that genocide occurs because individuals, organizations, and governments make choices to participate, resist, or turn away. Students can also see that at the same
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Self-Care Among Chronically Ill African Americans: Culture, Health Disparities, and Health Insurance
Little is known about the self-care practices of chronically ill African Americans or how lack of access to health care affects self-care. Results from a qualitative interview study of 167 African Americans who had one or more chronic illnesses found that self-care practices were culturally based, and the insured reported more extensive programs of self-care. Those who had some form of health insurance much more frequently reported the influence of physicians and health education programs in sel
Author(s): Becker, Gay,Gates, Rahima Jan,Newsom, Edwina

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Barcoding Life to Conserve Biological Diversity: Beyond the Taxonomic Imperative
Barcoding Life to Conserve Biological Diversity: Beyond the Taxonomic Imperative
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

LSE Literary Weekend - Hackney, That Rose-Red Empire
Editors note: Unfortunately the last few minutes of this event are missing from the podcast. Iain Sinclair is a writer, poet and film-maker and widely regarded as one of London's greatest chroniclers. Jerry White has been writing about London for thirty years. His London in the Twentieth Century: A City and Its People won the Wolfson History Prize 2001. Patrick Wright is a writer with an interest in the cultural and political dimensions of modern history. He is the author of a number of highly a
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Hommage à Stanley Cavell - La fabrique cavellienne des genres

Penser les genres cinématographiques Présidence : Sandra Laugier

Un second souffle pour la philosophie du cinéma en France

L’ambition de ce colloque interdisciplinaire est de contribuer à la réception de la pensée du cinéma du
philosophe américain Stanley Cavell, en interrogeant ses travaux dans une perspective croisant la théorie
cinématographique et philosophique avec la cr
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Learning How to Cite Judith Butler
This lecture explores the production of critical value and competency in contemporary feminist theory. Robyn Wiegman is Professor of Women's Studies and Literature and former Director of the Women's Studies Program at Duke from 2001-2007. Her publications include American Anatomies: Theorizing Race and Gender (1995), Who Can Speak: Identity and Critical Authority (1995), Feminism Beside Itself (1995), AIDS and the National Body (1997), The Futures of American Studies (2002), and Women's Studies
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

What is Black History Month Part 4 of 4
This is the last part of the series and talks about the origins of Black History Month and Carter G. Woodson. (1:11)
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Shades of Vinton 2
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Civil Society, Aid and Security
The Obama administration has abandoned the term 'War on Terror' and taken steps to undo the worst excesses of the post-9/11 security regime. However the legislation, structures and practices introduced after the attacks remain deeply embedded. The event is followed by the launch of Jude Howell and Jeremy Lind's new book Counter-terrorism, Aid and Civil Society.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

The Emergence of a “Renewable Feedstock-Based” Chemical Industry
If the future once lay in plastics, as the film “The Graduate” claimed, today the watchword may be “feedstocks.” This term includes corn, wheat, soy, sunflower, rapeseed (canola)—the array of carbohydrates and proteins growing in fields across the planet. The news, as Douglas Cameron makes clear, is that these crops no lon
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Building Resilient Infrastructure to Combat Terrorism: Lessons from September 11th
Building Resilient Infrastructure to Combat Terrorism: Lessons from September 11th
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

How Can We Improve Disaster Response?

Even if the U.S. draws the right lessons from Hurricane Katrina, panelists suggest, the nation may still be caught short in the next disaster.

In some areas of government, Kenneth Oye points out, “weaknesses can go on for a long time because you don’t confront a reality test. Katrina was a reality test wi

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

The Next Catastrophe: Reducing Our Vulnerabilities to Natural, Industrial, and Terrorist Disasters
It’s time to trade in the Department of Homeland Security for a Department of Homeland Vulnerabilities, says Charles Perrow. At its peril, our nation “privileges terrorism over natural and industrial disasters.”

From Perrow’s perspective, the U.S. landscape is riddled with “weapons of mass destruction:

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Chantal Akerman: Moving through Time and Space
This exploration/homage arrives in the form of a lecture/conversation, breaking some conventions, not unlike the object/subject of the event, Chantal Akerman, filmmaker and video artist. Two Akerman experts discuss her work in the kick-off event to an exhibition at MIT’s List Visual Arts Center.

Fir

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Living with Catastrophic Terrorism: Can Science and Technology Make the U.S. Safer?
After the terrorists attack of September 11, three Academies-the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine-sponsored a major study of the role that science and technology might play in countering the threat of catastrophic terrorism in the United States. This study involved a committee of 24 expe
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Chomsky on Gaza
While he admits to no surprise about events in Gaza, Noam Chomsky does consider “the latest U.S.-Israeli attack on helpless Palestinians” a step beyond terrorism and aggression. He says “some new term is needed for the sadistic and cowardly torture of people caged with no possibility of escape, being pounded daily by the most s
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content