Brand Design in Television - Martin Lambie-Nairn
Lambie-Nairn began his career in 1976. In the 80’s his company quickly built a reputation for broadcast design with the launch of Channel 4 in the UK. Arguably this identity changed the face of television branding, as it was the first time a TV company had used its on-air identity to say something about itself as a brand as well as being the first to be designed to work on and off screen. This led to many years of working with the BBC during which he was part of re-defining the BBC brand. He
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A Life in Television - Jeremy Isaacs
Jeremy Isaacs is a television producer, broadcaster and arts impresario. Born in Glasgow, Isaacs was educated at Merton College, Oxford. He joined Granada Television as a producer (1958) and worked on programmes such as What The Papers Say and, for the BBC, Panorama. Isaacs has produced some of the most significant historical documentaries made for British television, such as The World At War (1975), made in 26 episodes, Ireland: A Television History (1981) and the Cold War (1998). He has been
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Film in history/history in film
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009 This module explores the inter-relations and interactions of film and history in 20th century Europe and the United States (with a few classic films from elsewhere). It considers how films have appropriated past events as their core subject matter or setting, for purposes of nostalgic entertainment or didactic drama, for social commentary, philosophical enquiry or political protest
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Depiction of terrorism in film and television
In this podcast, Professor Roberta Pearson from the School of American and Canadian Studies, discusses the fictional representation of terrorism in modern day television programmes and why more and more people are using fiction instead of the news to inform their opinions of world events. Professor Pearson considers the frequent engagement of modern audiences with such television series' as '24' and 'Battlestar Galactica' and how these common cultural experiences should not be underestimated as
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Rights not set

Part 6: A film crew making an advertisement.
Part 6: A film crew making an advertisement. using media
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Terrorism, Peace, and Other Inconsistencies
This course addresses a set of inter-related questions that have become central to peace and security in the modern era, at both the domestic and international levels. What is the history and rationale for contemporary terrorism, including suicide terrorism? What does the rise of al-Qaeda terror mean for a host of problematic issues including the relationship between the Western and Islamic worlds, the future of peace in the Middle East, the future of various western foreign policy actions? What
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Depiction of Terrorism in Film and Television: Professor Roberta Pearson
  Professor Roberta Pearson

In this podcast, Professor Roberta Pearson from the School of American and Canadian Studies, discusses the fictional representation of terrorism in modern day television programmes and why more and more people are using fiction instead of the news to inform their opinions of world events.

Professor Pearson considers the frequent engagement of modern audienc
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A Life in Television - Jeremy Isaacs
Jeremy Isaacs is a television producer, broadcaster and arts impresario. Born in Glasgow, Isaacs was educated at Merton College, Oxford. He joined Granada Television as a producer (1958) and worked on programmes such as What The Papers Say and, for the BBC, Panorama. Isaacs has produced some of the most significant historical documentaries made for British television, such as The World At War (1975), made in 26 episodes, Ireland: A Television History (1981) and the Cold War (1998). He has been
Author(s): No creator set

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Brand Design in Television - Martin Lambie-Nairn
Lambie-Nairn began his career in 1976. In the 80’s his company quickly built a reputation for broadcast design with the launch of Channel 4 in the UK. Arguably this identity changed the face of television branding, as it was the first time a TV company had used its on-air identity to say something about itself as a brand as well as being the first to be designed to work on and off screen. This led to many years of working with the BBC during which he was part of re-defining the BBC brand. He
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Getting into Television - Jim Sayer, Maverick TV
Maverick’s MD Jim Sayer, appointed just last year, is the latest name to accept the invite to come and converse in Coventry. He spoke to Philip Draycott about the challenges of independent production and ways in to TV for young people and others. Jim’s credits as Executive Producer for Maverick include The Property Chain and Taboogie for Channel 4, Selling Yourself for Five and Who’ll Age Worst for UKTV. Prior to coming to Maverick, he was responsible for include the highly acclaimed seri
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Working in the British Film Industry - Lucy Main
Lucy Main graduated from Coventry in 2002 with a BA honours degree in Communication, Culture and Media plus some great intentions. After working for the BBC and a number of corporate production companies on blue chip accounts, Lucy conducted a smash and grab raid for a management position at the New Producers Alliance (NPA). In this Coventry Conversation you can here Lucy talking about her current role as Executive Producer on a number of films being made in the UK.
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Histology, areolar connective tissue film (rat) x40, (direct/above view)
Histology, areolar connective tissue film (rat) x40, (direct/above view). Rat dissection stills taken from FARID (Functional Anatomy of the Rat [Interactive Dissection]). This resource was authored by Megan Quentin-Baxter and David Dewhurst, with Graham Irving and Stephen Mera at Leeds Metropolitan University.
Author(s): Megan Quentin-Baxter, Newcastle University

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Histology, areolar connective tissue film (rat) x10, (direct/above view)
Histology, areolar connective tissue film (rat) x10, (direct/above view). Rat dissection stills taken from FARID (Functional Anatomy of the Rat [Interactive Dissection]). This resource was authored by Megan Quentin-Baxter and David Dewhurst, with Graham Irving and Stephen Mera at Leeds Metropolitan University.
Author(s): Megan Quentin-Baxter, Newcastle University

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Joanne Bernardi: Film Preservation
Joanne Bernardi on the value of film preservation.
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New Uga VIII Television PSA
Uga VIII is welcomed as the new University of Georgia athletic mascot.
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September 11 - Film by Jules and Gedeon Naudet
In 2001, Gedeon and Jules Naudet were filming a documentary about a young New York City firefighter from Engine 7, Ladder 1.  While Jules was at the scene of a gas leak, the first attack on the World Trade Center took place. (58:32)

Jules (who was still learning his craft) filmed Flight 11 as it crashed into the North Tower.  In this clip, from an interview with Charlie Rose, Jules and his brother relate what happened on the September 11 morning when America was attacked.

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Depiction of terrorism in film and television
In this podcast, Professor Roberta Pearson from the School of American and Canadian Studies, discusses the fictional representation of terrorism in modern day television programmes and why more and more people are using fiction instead of the news to inform their opinions of world events. Professor Pearson considers the frequent engagement of modern audiences with such television series’ as ‘24’ and ‘Battlestar Galactica’ and how these common cultural experiences should not be underest
Author(s): Pearson Roberta E. Professor

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Birefringence in a film of polypropylene
The colours in the image are the result of birefringence and relate to the residual stress in the film, following the biaxial stretching process. The uniformity of the colour (with contrast only where an additional thickness of film exists or where wrinkling has resulted in a different apparent thickness) is indicative of both a uniform film thickness and of the uniformity of the drawing process used to make the film. Note that unlike polyethylene, the film has not been permanently strained in t
Author(s): J A Curran, Department of Materials Science and Me

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Sinclair Micro sized Television
Micro sized television with very small screen (less than 2 ' x 1') Push buttons for selection use in US, Europe etc. Retractable aerial and 'loop' type wire aerial. Dark grey metallic housing. Also mains adaptor. Maker: Sinclair - from the The Betty Smithers Design Collection at Staffordshire University.
Author(s): The Betty Smithers Design Collection at Staffordsh

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Ordered film of carbon nanotubes
It is necessary to form a stable dispersion of nanotubes in order to properly integrate them into polymeric systems. This can be achieved by treating them with acid to oxidise the tube surfaces. The tubes will then spontaneously disperse in an aqueous medium. The viscosity of these suspensions is analogous to that of polymers; it increases gradually with concentration up to a critical point (at about 0.7vol%) where entanglement occurs. A solid nanotube film has been formed by filtering the suspe
Author(s): Prof A H Windle, Department of Materials Science a

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