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Lolita with Imraan Coovadia
Acclaimed novelist Imraan Coovadia spoke at UCT Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts GIPCA Great Texts Big Questions public lecture on Thursday 1 April He discussed How to read Lolita. Written by Vladimir Nabokov Lolita was first published in Paris in 1955 It is one of the best known and most controversial books of 20th Century literature Coovadia says I will be talking about the Lolita problem How do we respond to a book which is a first person narrative by a man who is trying to s
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Imagining the City: Memories and cultures in Cape Town
The overriding strength of this book is that it places people, ordinary people at the centre of memory at the centre of historical and contemporary experience and thus at the centre of re-imagining and owning the city of Cape Town It is as they speak what they choose to say what they choose to remain silent about that we become aware of the possibilities of the city if it really did embrace all its people in all of their diversity. From the Foreword by Mike van Graan playwright and arts activist
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Oral History and Digital Stories from Cape Town
People in South Africa have a dynamic but largely unrecorded heritage. The Centre for Popular Memory CPM creates spaces for these stories to be heard seen and remembered The CPM presents various oral history and memory courses for on and off campus students such as a 1st semester postgraduate course Oral History Method and Practice and Theory HST4034Z which provides skills training in oral history interviewing and interpretation an undergraduate course Memory Identity and History HST3037S explor
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WISE - The Web-Based Inquiry Science Environment
The Web-based Inquiry Science Environment (WISE) is a free on-line science learning environment for students in grades 4-12. In WISE, students work on exciting inquiry projects on topics such as genetically modified foods, earthquake prediction, and the deformed frogs mystery. Students learn about and respond to contemporary scientific controversies through designing, debating, and critiquing solutions, all via the internet. Curriculum projects are complete and ready to use in the classroom. The
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Exploring Magnetism
The goal of this unit is for students to develop a deeper understanding of electromagnetism through inquiry based activities. The first session in the guide is designed to teach students that magnets have an invisible force field known as a magnetic field, and that this field has an effect that can be measured around a magnet using a compass. The second session is designed to teach students that electricity flowing in wires also creates an invisible magnetic field that can also be measured using
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Herb Sutter: (Not Your Father’s) C++

What makes ISO C++11 "feel like a new language"? What things that we know about past C++ do we need to unlearn? Why is C++ designed the way it is – historically, and in C++11? Finally, what is the difference between managed and native languages anyway, and when is each applicable? This talk gives an overview and motivation of modern C++ and why it's clean, safe, and fast – as clean to code in and as type-safe as any modern language,
Author(s): Herb Sutter

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Springwood: Birthplace and Home to Franklin D. Roosevelt
is the only place in the U.S. where a President was born, maintained a lifelong connection, and lies buried. The estate, located in Hyde Park on the Hudson River (New York), is where he was raised and where he and his wife, Eleanor, raised their five children. During his first political election he ...
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Wright Brothers National Memorial: Site of the First Controlled Powered Flight
tells how bicycle makers in Dayton, Ohio, launched the aviation age. After reading about the glider accident that killed Otto Lilienthal, Wilbur and Orville Wright spent four years designing flying machines in Dayton and testing them near Kitty Hawk. Maps and photos show their flying machines and living ...
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Celebrate Hispanic American Month
highlights publications, properties listed in the National Register, and National Parks related to the creativity, culture, and political experiences of Hispanic Americans.
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"Gender, Race, and the Complexities of Science and Technology: A Problem-Based Learning Experiment,
"What can we learn about science and technology–and what can we do with that knowledge? Who are "we" in these questions?–whose knowledge and expertise gets made into public policy, new medicines, topics of cultural and political discourse, science education, and so on? How can expertise and lay knowledge about science and technology be reconciled in a democratic society? How can we make sense of the interactions of living and non-living, humans and non-humans, individual and collectivities i
Author(s): Fausto-Sterling, Anne,Taylor, Peter

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Democratic Convention Analysis
What did the Democrats accomplish this week and can they deliver real change while still playing old fashioned Beltway politics? In the historic moment of the first African-American nominee for President, Bill Moyers sits down with Nation editor Katrina vanden Heuvel and University of Pennsylvania professor of political science Adolph Reed, Jr. to discuss the promises from the DNC and expectations of Barack Obama. Also on the program, Bill Moyers speaks with political analysts Merle and Earl B
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21L.488 Contemporary Literature: British Novels Now (MIT)
What is Britain now? Its metropolises are increasingly multicultural. Its hold over its distant colonies is a thing of the past. Its sway within the global political arena is weak. Its command over Northern Ireland, Wales, and Scotland is broken or threatened. What have novelists made of all this? What are they writing as the old empire fades away and as new social and political formations emerge? These are the questions that will concern us in this course.
Author(s): Brouillette, Sarah

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Andrew J. Bacevich
Is an imperial presidency destroying what America stands for? Bill Moyers sits down with history and international relations expert and former US Army Colonel Andrew J. Bacevich who identifies three major problems facing our democracy: the crises of economy, government and militarism, and calls for a redefinition of the American way of life. "Because of this preoccupation with the presidency," says Bacevich, "the president has become what we have instead of genuine politics, instead of genuine
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Scientific Research
Students will demonstrate their knowledge of scientific inquiry by designing and conducting a scientific experiment using innovated technology. Students will explain how their scientific research relates to the Nebraska State Science Standards.
Author(s): Megan Hylok

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Forensic flavour
This case study describes the current trend for crime scene investigation drama and news stories of personal tragedies involving incorrect or missing data have been harnessed to capture the attention and inspire learning and enterprise skills in students studying database compilation
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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

27 - Legacies of the Civil War
Professor Blight finishes his lecture series with a discussion of the legacies of the Civil War. Since the nineteenth century, Blight suggests, there have been three predominant strains of Civil War memory, which Blight defines as reconciliationist, white supremacist, and emancipationist. The war has retained a political currency throughout the years, and the ability to control the memory of the Civil War has been, and continues to be, hotly contested.
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18 - "War So Terrible": Why the Union Won and the Confederacy Lost at Home and Abroad
This lecture probes the reasons for confederate defeat and union victory. Professor Blight begins with an elucidation of the loss-of-will thesis, which suggests that it was a lack of conviction on the home front that assured confederate defeat, before offering another of other popular explanations for northern victory: industrial capacity, political leadership, military leadership, international diplomacy, a pre-existing political culture, and emancipation. Blight warns, however, that we cannot
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Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson was the third President of the United States (1801--1809), author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential founders of the United States. Major events during his presidency include the Louisiana Purchase (1803), the Embargo Act of 1807, and the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804--1806).

A political philosopher who promoted classical liberalism, republicanism, and the separation of church and state, he was the author of the Virginia St

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Polls and Polling
Pollsters have been gathering information about Americans' opinions of candidates and presidents since 1932 when a man named Gallup took a poll to determine his mother-in-law's chances of election to a state post in Iowa. The poll did so well in predicting her win that other pollsters soon followed suit in the prediction business. Taking polls is now a fixture of the political landscape. Presidents use this information to craft policies and legislation, while the media uses the results of polls
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The Southern Culture
This video is accompanied by text. "By the mid nineteenth century, the south had developed into an aristocracy, with wealthy plantation owners at the top of the social ladder. In 1850, only a small minority—approximately 1,750 families—owned more than 100 slaves each. This small group of people carried significant political and social power. Southern aristocrats used their wealth to send their children to the finest schools, which were often in the north or overseas..."
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