Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 9071 result(s) returned

Human Power
Students do work by lifting a known mass over a period of time. The mass and measured distance and time is used to calculate force, work, energy and power in metric units. The students’ power is then compared to horse power and the power required to light a 60 W light bulb.
Author(s): Office of Educational Partnerships,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Office of Educational Partnerships, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Sounds All Around
Students follow the steps of the engineering design process to create their own ear trumpet devices (used before modern-day hearing aids), including testing them with a set of reproducible sounds. They learn to recognize different pitches, and see how engineers must test designs and materials to achieve the best amplifying properties.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

My Mechanical Ear Can Hear!
Students are introduced to various types of hearing impairments and the types of biomedical devices that engineers have designed to aid people with this physical disability.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Engineering in Reverse!
Students learn about the process of reverse engineering and how this technique is used to improve upon technology. Students analyze push-toys and draw diagrams of the predicted mechanisms inside the toys. Then, they disassemble the toys and draw the actual inner mechanisms. By understanding how the push-toys function, students make suggestions for improvement, such as cost effectiveness, improved functionality, ecological friendliness and any additional functionality they determine is an improve
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Cutting Through Soil
Students pretend they are agricultural engineers during the colonial period and design a miniature plow that cuts through a “field” of soil. They are introduced to the engineering design process and learn of several famous historical figures who contributed to plow design.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Solar Water Heater
Student teams design and build solar water heating devices that mimic those used in residences to capture energy in the form of solar radiation and convert it to thermal energy. This thermal energy is next transferred to water (to be used as domestic hot water) in the form of heat. In doing this, students gain a better understanding of the three different types of heat transfer, each of which plays a role in the solar water heater design. Once the model devices are constructed, students perform
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Blast Off
Rockets need a lot of thrust to get into space. In this lesson, students learn how rocket thrust is generated with propellant. The two types of propellants are discussed and relation to their use on rockets is investigated. Students learn why engineers need to know the different properties of propellants.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Powerful Pulleys
Students continue to explore the story of building a pyramid, learning about the simple machine called a pulley. They learn how a pulley can be used to change the direction of applied forces and move/lift extremely heavy objects, and the powerful mechanical advantages of using a multiple-pulley system. Students perform a simple demonstration to see the mechanical advantage of using a pulley, and they identify modern day engineering applications of pulleys. In a hands-on activity, they see how a
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

All Caught Up
Commercial fishing nets often trap unprofitable animals in the process of catching their target species. In the following activity, students will experience the difficulty that fishermen experience while trying to isolate a target species when a variety of animals are found in the area of interest. The class will then discuss the large magnitude of this problem. Students will practice their data acquisition and analysis skills, through the collection of data and processing of this information to
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Sound for Sight
Echolocation is the ability to orient by transmitting sound and receiving echoes from objects in the environment. As a result of a Marco-Polo type activity and subsequent lesson, students learn basic concepts of echolocation. They use these concepts to understand how dolphins use echolocation to locate prey, escape predators, navigate their environment, such as avoiding gillnets set by commercial fishing vessels. Students will also learn that dolphin sounds are vibrations created by vocal organs
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Do Different Colors Absorb Heat Better?
Students test whether the color of a material affects how much heat it absorbs. Students will place an ice cube in a box made of colored paper (one box per color; white, yellow, red and black), which they will place in the sun. The students will make prediction as to which color will melt the ice cube first. They will record the order and time required for the ice cubes to melt.
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Portable Sundial
Students investigate the accuracy of sundials and the discrepancy that lies between "real time" and "clock time." They track the position of the sun during the course of a relatively short period of time as they make a shadow plot, a horizontal sundial, and a diptych sundial. (The activity may be abridged to include only one or two of the different sundials, instead of all three.)
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Tracking a Virus
Students simulate the spread of a virus such as HIV through a population by “sharing” (but not drinking) the water in a plastic cup with several classmates. Although invisible, the water in a few of the cups will already be tainted with the “virus” (sodium carbonate). After all the students have shared their liquids, the contents of the cups will be tested for the virus with phenolphthalein, a chemical that causes a striking color change in the presence of sodium carbonate. Students will
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Does Weight Matter?
Using the same method for measuring friction that was used in the previous lesson (Discovering Friction), students design and conduct an experiment to determine if weight added incrementally to an object affects the amount of friction encountered when it slides across a flat surface. After graphing the data from their experiments, students can calculate the coefficients of friction between the object and the surface it moved upon, for both static and kinetic friction.
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

License information
Related content

Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

2.3 Experimental studies of energy balance

The energy that a human takes in, primarily in food or nutritive fluids, has to be balanced by the energy lost in various ways. Some energy is used to maintain basic metabolic processes, some in physical activity while the remainder is lost as heat, or in the faeces or urine. If energy input and output do not balance, then the residue must either result in a loss or a gain in body weight.

One way of estimating these energy fluxes is to use the technique of whole room indirect calorim
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Assessing your skills
Welcome to Assessing Your Skills one of the series of Futures workbooks, which help students choose and prepare for their careers. Like the other workbooks in the series you can dip in and out doing the exercises which are most relevant to you. You might want to include the exercises or the output in your personal development plan or e-portfolio. The aim of this workbook is to help you to clarify or identify your skills as a first step toward choosing work that really suits you. It can also he
Author(s): Laura Dean

License information
Related content

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

7.2 Developing a strategy

Present notes/records that show you have planned your use of skills to work with others. Your evidence must include:

  • the goals you hope to achieve over 3–4 months or so; you should indicate how these goals relate to the context in which you are working and to your current capabilities;

  • notes/records about the resources you might use and what information you need to support you in developing your skills and completing the work; for e
    Author(s): No creator set

    License information
    Related content

    Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

6.1 What is a PDF?
Frightened of the internet? This unit will help you make effective use of the internet, giving you the basic skills required for using web-based resources. Useful tricks and tips are provided as well as information on web browsers, the main features of a browser window, how to look at websites, using hyperlinks, searching for information on the internet, copying text, avoiding computer viruses, and using PDFs.
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Acknowledgements
In this unit you will find a discussion of the national curricula framework in Scotland. This is discussed in terms of the literacy curricula, and compared to the framework set up in England and Wales.
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

6 Collaboration between teachers and parents
In this unit you will find a discussion of the national curricula framework in Scotland. This is discussed in terms of the literacy curricula, and compared to the framework set up in England and Wales.
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454