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Factors Affecting Friction
Based on what they have already learned about friction, students formulate hypotheses concerning the effects of weight and contact area on the amount of friction between two surfaces. In the Associated Activities (Does Weight Matter? and Does Area Matter?), students design and conduct simple experiments to test their hypotheses, using procedures similar to those used in the previous lesson (Discovering Friction). An analysis of their data will reveal the importance of weight to normal friction (
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Permission to Play: Game Changing Research
Are there now too many issues attached to the practice of play for it to be just plain fun? Nickelodeon executive Jane Gould describes a study on kids’ play that reveals real tensions within the family on the subject. Although parents feel confused and conflicted, and kids stifled and controlled, families are managing to find
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Le cerveau et le monde : Shining et après. Conférence d'Emmanuel Siety (audio)

Dans L’Image-temps, Gilles Deleuze voyait en Stanley Kubrick, à l’instar d’Alain Resnais, un cinéaste « de l’identité du monde et du cerveau ». En partant de Shining, nous questionnerons et prolongerons ce rapprochement en avançant trois autres noms de cinéastes explorateurs d’états limites du monde et de la conscience : David Lynch, Michael Haneke et Gus Van Sant.

Emmanuel Siety est maître de conférences en cinéma à l’université Paris 3 - Sor
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How we came to be at MIT/MSRP Orientation
June 6, 2011 - The MIT Summer Research Program (http://web.mit.edu/msrp/) brings talented undergraduate interns to MIT's campus. In this 2011 orientation session, six current graduate students give advice and answer questions regarding MIT and graduate community, as well as academia in general and occupational work. Panelists: Zinzile Brooks, Obioma Ohia, Daniel Soltero, Maria Telleria, David Hill.
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Law making in the House of Commons and House of Lords

One of the main functions of both Houses of Parliament is to discuss, debate and pass new laws. Laws made by Parliament are called Acts of Parliament. Acts of Parliament are also known as statutes or legislation. These terms all mean the same thing and will be used interchangeably throughout this unit.

Acts of Parliament may originate in various ways:

  1. party manifestos

  2. national emergency, crisis or new development


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7.3.1 Stages of a Bill

  • 1 First reading: The title of a Bill is read out and copies of it are printed, but no debate takes place. There will be a vote on whether the House wishes to consider the Bill further.

  • 2 Second reading: The general principles contained in the Bill are debated by MPs. Frequently, the second reading stage is the point at which public attention becomes drawn to the proposal through press coverage, and on occasion, vociferous campa
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7.1 Reserved and devolved matters

As stated earlier, the UK Parliament can still legislate on reserved matters and also on devolved matters, with the agreement of the Scottish Parliament. This section looks at the law making process at Westminster. It is a very different process, which involves both the Houses of the Westminster Parliament.

An Act of the UK Parliament also starts off as a Bill, which, if approved by a majority in the House of Commons and the House of Lords, will become an Act of the Westminster Parliame
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6.7 Royal Assent

Section 32 of the Scotland Act provides that a Bill, once passed, must be submitted for Royal Assent. This is done after a period of four weeks. During that time, the Bill is subject to legal challenge by the Advocate General for Scotland, the Lord Advocate or the Attorney General, and may also be subject to an order made by the Secretary of State. The Presiding Officer may, however, submit the Bill for Royal Assent after less than four weeks if notified by all three Law Officers and the Secr
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5.2.2 Avoiding absurdity

One such strategy is to be as true to the literal meaning as is possible but to ensure, so far as the words allow, an interpretation which avoids absurdity. In the case of the rule I have just set out, this would mean an interpretation which ensured that only those customers who had caused breakages were obliged to pay for them.

This approach works well in most cases, but not always. Take, for example, another rule posted up in a shop selling china and glass:

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5.2.1 A literal approach

One way in which we can interpret a rule is by treating it literally. Very simply this means looking at the words which comprise the rule, and at the way in which they are put together, and applying the rule ‘as is’ to a factual situation to which it applies. An example would be: ‘Dog owners are not permitted to let their dogs off the lead in the park’. If this is applied literally, it would mean that a person who did not own a dog, but who took a friend's dog to the park, w
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4.3 Summary of Part C

After studying Part C you should be able to:

  • explain the problems associated with formulating rules;

  • identify whether a rule is too specific;

  • identify whether a rule is too general;

  • identify solutions to a problem of rule formulation.

3.3 The Irish anti-smoking law

You now know what the Irish Government's arguments for introducing the smoking ban were, and have read some of the reactions to it. We are now going to turn to the law itself. The passage I want you to read is from the Irish Government Public Services website and explains the new law in simple language. Read the passage in Box 4 carefully and answer the questions in the activity which follows. The questions ask you to interpret the rules, something we will be looking at in more detail later i
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3.2 The policy behind Ireland's ban on smoking in the workplace

In order to explore these issues, we are going to look at the introduction of a rule in the Republic of Ireland – the ban on smoking in places where people work which was introduced in 2004. What I would like you to do first is to think about your own position on this subject. The purpose of the next activity is to provide you with an opportunity to think about your own attitudes to a particular kind of behaviour which many people feel should be subject to legal control. It is useful to wor
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3.1 Introduction

Precedent is the basis of the common law. The doctrine of binding precedent is known as the doctrine of stare decisis, which is Latin meaning ‘to stand by/adhere to decided cases’, i.e. to follow precedent. In other words, once a principle is decided it should be followed in future cases. The doctrine refers to the fact that, within the hierarchical structure of the English courts, the decision of a higher court will be binding on a lower court. In general terms, this means th
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Les négociations
Je bent in staat om te onderhandelen met de buren om het probleem van lawaaihinder op te lossen.
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Seminar 10-USAWC Class of 2011
Ten months of readings, papers, exercises and complex seminar discussions paid off for the Army War College Class of 2011 as they graduated in front of friends, family, colleagues and international partners on the historic parade grounds of Carlisle Barracks.
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Seminar 11-USAWC Class of 2011
Ten months of readings, papers, exercises and complex seminar discussions paid off for the Army War College Class of 2011 as they graduated in front of friends, family, colleagues and international partners on the historic parade grounds of Carlisle Barracks.
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Carried interest is a "bumper sticker" issue: Carlyle Group co-founder
Carlyle Group's David Rubenstein says carried interest isn't significant enough to affect debt, the deficit or overall tax reform.
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Zebrafish blood vessels allow blood to circulate
Tail section of Danio where blood flows from the dorsal vessel (moves blood to the tail) to the ventral vessel (returns blood to the head).
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Foundations of Modern Social Theory — Open Yale Courses
This course provides an overview of major works of social thought from the beginning of the modern era through the 1920s. Attention is paid to social and intellectual contexts, conceptual frameworks and methods, and contributions to contemporary social analysis. Writers include Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Adam Smith, Marx, Weber, and Durkheim.
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