Why all Governments Need Spin - Nicholas Jones
Nicholas Jones was for many years BBC political correspondent. His books include Sultans of Spin, The Control Freaks, Soundbites and Spin Doctors and Trading Information. He has been involved in the world of politics for more than 30 years as a journalist, most prominently as the BBC’s political correspondent and in uniquely qualified to talk about how politicians can manipulate the media. In this Coventry Conversation, Nicholas discusses why spin is central to all governments, both Tory and
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Is there a Crisis in World Journalism? Dr Suzanne Franks
Suzanne Franks is Director of Research at Kent University’s Centre for Journalism. At the start of her journalism career she worked with the BBC as a researcher on documentaries and then joined the Television Current Affairs department, producing programmes such as Newsnight, Watchdog, The Money Programme and Panorama. In the 1990s she started an independent production company, Sevenday Productions, which was awarded the first outside contract for the televising of Parliament. She was based in
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The Election in Numbers - Roger Mortimer, MORI
Dr Roger Mortimore is Director of Political Analysis at Ipsos MORI. He was co-editor of the last two Political Communications studies of British general elections, and co-author of a number of other books on British elections. Here he discusses statistics and polls undertaken throughout this years general election, including how the exit poll managed to predict the result so accurately. To see the slides from this presentation visit http://cutoday.wordpress.com/2010/05/14/election-results-just-
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Virtual Maths - Numbers, 2D Elipse simulation tool
Interactive simulation tool demonstrating formula for calculating the area of an elipse
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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Office Hours with Anirudh Krishna on Why People Become Poor
Anirudh Krishna is an associate professor of public policy and political science and associate dean for international academic programs at Duke University's Sanford School. He discussed causes of poverty in an "Office Hours" webcast interview October 1, 2010. Learn more at http://sanford.duke.edu.
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Dante's Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise - Yale University
This course by Giuseppe Mazzotta is an introduction to Dante and his cultural milieu through a critical reading of the Divine Comedy and selected minor works (Vita nuova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia, Epistle to Cangrande). An analysis of Dante's autobiography, the Vita nuova, establishes the poetic and political circumstances of the Comedy's composition. Readings of Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise seek to situate Dante's work within the intellectual and social context of the late Middle Ages
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Acknowledgements
This unit provides basic historical background to the French Revolution. It will show that the Revolution accelerated intellectual, cultural and psychological change, and opened up new horizons and possibilities. In fact, while much controversy and scepticism remain as to the real extent of underlying change in the social and economic structure of France, it is generally agreed by scholars that the Revolution stimulated a widening of expectations and imaginative awareness: a belief, inherited fr
Author(s): The Open University

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References
This unit provides basic historical background to the French Revolution. It will show that the Revolution accelerated intellectual, cultural and psychological change, and opened up new horizons and possibilities. In fact, while much controversy and scepticism remain as to the real extent of underlying change in the social and economic structure of France, it is generally agreed by scholars that the Revolution stimulated a widening of expectations and imaginative awareness: a belief, inherited fr
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Acknowledgements
In this unit we examine the Royal Pavilion at Brighton, and its relationship to nineteenth century romanticism and exoticism. We begin with a biographical discussion of the Prince of Wales, afterwards Prince Regent and eventually King George IV, to whose specifications the Pavilion was built. With the help of video and still images we take a tour of the Pavilion, examining the exterior then a series of interior rooms as a visitor in the 1820s may have experienced them. Besides this we look at co
Author(s): The Open University

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Conclusion
In this unit we examine the Royal Pavilion at Brighton, and its relationship to nineteenth century romanticism and exoticism. We begin with a biographical discussion of the Prince of Wales, afterwards Prince Regent and eventually King George IV, to whose specifications the Pavilion was built. With the help of video and still images we take a tour of the Pavilion, examining the exterior then a series of interior rooms as a visitor in the 1820s may have experienced them. Besides this we look at co
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Acknowledgements
What does Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus tell us about the author and the time at which the play was written? This unit will help you to discover the intricacies of the play and recognise how a knowledge of the historical and political background of the time can lead to a very different understanding of the author's intended meaning.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

References
What does Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus tell us about the author and the time at which the play was written? This unit will help you to discover the intricacies of the play and recognise how a knowledge of the historical and political background of the time can lead to a very different understanding of the author's intended meaning.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Learning outcomes
What does Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus tell us about the author and the time at which the play was written? This unit will help you to discover the intricacies of the play and recognise how a knowledge of the historical and political background of the time can lead to a very different understanding of the author's intended meaning.
Author(s): The Open University

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References
In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the approach to medicine was vastly different from today. Health is now recognised, at least in most European countries, as a universal right, but what was it like in the past? How did social and political boundaries affect access to treatment, and what were the treatments of the day? This unit examines how Scottish healthcare institutions were influenced by these underlying social, economic, political and cultural contexts.
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes
In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the approach to medicine was vastly different from today. Health is now recognised, at least in most European countries, as a universal right, but what was it like in the past? How did social and political boundaries affect access to treatment, and what were the treatments of the day? This unit examines how Scottish healthcare institutions were influenced by these underlying social, economic, political and cultural contexts.
Author(s): The Open University

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Election 2010- what about women?
This site was created by the Fawcett Society during the 2010 U.K general election. The project brings together the main political parties along with other organisations and women voters to ask questions about political policies relating to women. The site includes the questions asked, the responses from the parties and voters.
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This unit examines the role that Scots played in contributing to the developments in healthcare during the nineteenth century. The radical transformation of medicine in Europe included the admission of women as doctors and the increased numbers of specialised institutions such as asylums. Such developments were also influenced by wider social, economic, political and cultural backgrounds – these are also examined.
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes
This unit examines the role that Scots played in contributing to the developments in healthcare during the nineteenth century. The radical transformation of medicine in Europe included the admission of women as doctors and the increased numbers of specialised institutions such as asylums. Such developments were also influenced by wider social, economic, political and cultural backgrounds – these are also examined.
Author(s): The Open University

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Episode 108: Intellectualizing infidelity: A feminist remix

Political scientist Dr Lauren Rosewarne combines the academic and personal in a critical, feminist examination of being the ìother womanî in a affair with a married man. With host Jennifer Cook.

Guest

Dr Lauren Rosewarne
Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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