You’re the Expert
Student teams learn about and devise technical presentations on four reproductive technology topics — pregnancy ultrasound, amniocentesis, in-vitro fertilization or labor anesthetics. Each team acts as a panel of engineers asked to make a presentation to a group of students unfamiliar with the reproductive technology. Each group incorporates non-lecture elements into its presentation for greater effectiveness. As students learn about the technologies, by creating a presentation and listening t
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Sound Booth Construction
Students explore the sound dampening ability of numerous materials by designing and prototyping model sound booths. As a result, students learn about how sound is reflected, absorbed and travels through various materials, thus giving them an overview of sound dampening, energy absorption and sound propagation in the context of engineering. Students also create blueprints and document their findings in a formal lab report.
Author(s): Electrical and Computer Engineering Department,

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Copyright 2011 - Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Drexel University GK-12 Program,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

My Mechanical Ear Can Hear!
Students are introduced to various types of hearing impairments and the types of biomedical devices that engineers have designed to aid people with this physical disability.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Protect Those Eyes
Students design and build prototypes for protective eyewear. They choose different activities or sports that require protective eyewear and design a device for that particular use. Students learn about the many ways in which the eyes can be damaged and how engineers incorporate different features and materials into eyewear designs to best protect the eyes.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Power Your House with Water
Students learn how engineers design devices that use water to generate electricity by building model water turbines and measuring the resulting current produced in a motor. Students work through the engineering design process to build the turbines, analyze the performance of their turbines and make calculations to determine the most suitable locations to build dams.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Exploring Light: Absorb, Reflect, Transmit or Refract?
In a hands-on way, students explore light’s properties of absorption, reflection, transmission and refraction through various experimental stations within the classroom. To understand absorption, reflection and transmission, they shine flashlights on a number of preselected objects. To understand refraction, students create indoor rainbows. An understanding of the fundamental properties of light is essential to designing an invisible laser security system.
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Laser Light Properties: Protecting the Mummified Troll!
Students learn and use the properties of light to solve the following challenge: “A mummified troll was discovered this summer at our school and it has generated lots of interest worldwide. The principal asked us, the technology classes, to design a security system that alerts the police if someone tries to pilfer our prized possession. How can we construct a system that allows visitors to view our artifact during the day, but invisibly protects it at night in a cost-effective way?”
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Learning Light’s Properties
Students learn the basic properties of light — the concepts of light absorption, transmission, reflection and refraction, as well as the behavior of light during interference. Lecture information briefly addresses the electromagnetic spectrum and then provides more in-depth information on visible light. With this knowledge, students better understand lasers and are better prepared to design a security system for the mummified troll.
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Both Fields at Once?!
This lesson discusses the result of a charge being subject to both electric and magnetic fields at the same time. It covers the Hall effect, velocity selector, and the charge to mass ratio. Given several sample problems, students learn to calculate the Hall Voltage dependent upon the width of the plate, the drift velocity, and the strength of the magnetic field. Then students learn to calculate the velocity selector, represented by the ratio of the magnitude of the fields assuming the strength o
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Induced EMF in a coil of wire
Students use a simple set up consisting of a coil of wire and a magnet to visualize induced EMF. First, students move a coil of wire near a magnet and observe the voltage that results. They then experiment with moving the wire, magnet, and a second, current carrying coil. Students connect the coil to a circuit and the current from the induced EMF charges a conductor.
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Ampere’s Law
The lesson begins with a demonstration introducing students to the force between two current carrying loops, comparing the attraction and repulsion between the loops to that between two magnets. After formal lecture on Ampere’s law, students begin to use the concepts to calculate the magnetic field around a loop. This is applied to determine the magnetic field of a toroid, imagining a toroid as a looped solenoid.
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Changing Fields
This lesson begins with an activity in which students induce EMF in a coil of wire using magnetic fields. Then, demonstrations on Eddy currents show how a magnetic field can slow magnets just as Eddy currents are used to slow large trains. There is then a demonstration in which a loop “jumps” because of a changing magnetic field. Finally, formal lecture reviews the cross product with respect to magnetic force and introduces magnetic flux, Faraday’s law of Induction, Lenz’s Law, Eddy curr
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Muscles, Oh My!
Students are introduced to how engineering closely relates to the field of biomechanics and how the muscular system produces human movement. They learn the importance of the muscular system in our daily lives, why it is important to be able to repair muscular injuries and how engineering helps us by creating things to benefit our muscular health, movement and repair.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Cutting Through Soil
Students pretend they are agricultural engineers during the colonial period and design a miniature plow that cuts through a “field” of soil. They are introduced to the engineering design process and learn of several famous historical figures who contributed to plow design.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Global Climate Change
Students learn how the greenhouse effect is related to global warming and how global warming impacts our planet, including global climate change. Extreme weather events, rising sea levels, and how we react to these changes are the main points of focus of this lesson.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Design a Net-Zero Energy Classroom
Students create a concept design of their very own net-zero energy classroom by pasting renewable energy and energy-efficiency items into and around a pretend classroom on a sheet of paper. They learn how these items (such as solar panels, efficient lights, computers, energy meters, etc.) interact to create a learning environment that produces as much energy as it uses.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Probability, Permutations and Combinations
Students learn about probability by exploring relationships in a deck of cards. They start with basic concepts in probability and move on to permutations and combinations. Students apply their understanding of probability by pretending to be software engineers who are designing the scoring system for a card game.
Author(s): Electrical and Computer Engineering Department,

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Copyright 2011 - Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Drexel University GK-12 Program,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

How Good Is Your Hearing?
Students learn about the frequency range of human hearing by collecting data from a website simulation. They analyze the data to determine the typical range for students in their classroom. Students participate in a collaborative effort to gather scientific data on humans for use in designing an engineering product.
Author(s): Electrical and Computer Engineering Department,

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Copyright 2011 - Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Drexel University GK-12 Program,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Serial Dilution of a Fluorescent Compound
Students explore serial dilution, an important technique in physical science and engineering. They use a fluorescent compound as the dye to track through a series of dilution steps. They observe how the changing color intensity, or saturation, of each subsequent solution. They also keep a running calculation of the concentration dye in each serial dilution. Finally, using a UV lamp, they investigate whether the fluorescent dye can be detected after it disappears from view under normal lighting c
Author(s): Electrical and Computer Engineering Department,

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Copyright 2011 - Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Drexel University GK-12 Program,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Engineering Your Own Spectrograph
Students use simple materials to design an open spectrograph so they can calculate the angle light is bent when it passes through a holographic diffraction grating. A holographic diffraction grating acts like a prism, showing the visual components of light. After finding the desired angles, students use what they have learned to design their own spectrograph enclosure.
Author(s): Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP

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Copyright 2011 - Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php