3.4 Consensus conference on plant biotechnology
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.3 The consensus conference concept
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.2 Public consultation vs public engagement
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 Introduction
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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2 What should dialogue with the public aim to achieve?
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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1 How did the notion of public dialogue arise?
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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1.7 Protein digestion and absorption
This Unit studies 'proteins'. Starting with a simple analysis of the molecular make up, the Unit moves on to look at the importance of protein and how they are digested and absorbed
Author(s): The Open University

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1.6.4 Cooking eggs
This Unit studies 'proteins'. Starting with a simple analysis of the molecular make up, the Unit moves on to look at the importance of protein and how they are digested and absorbed
Author(s): The Open University

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1.5.3 Amino acid sequences
This Unit studies 'proteins'. Starting with a simple analysis of the molecular make up, the Unit moves on to look at the importance of protein and how they are digested and absorbed
Author(s): The Open University

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1.5.2 Linking more amino acids
This Unit studies 'proteins'. Starting with a simple analysis of the molecular make up, the Unit moves on to look at the importance of protein and how they are digested and absorbed
Author(s): The Open University

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1.5.1 Linking two amino acids
This Unit studies 'proteins'. Starting with a simple analysis of the molecular make up, the Unit moves on to look at the importance of protein and how they are digested and absorbed
Author(s): The Open University

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1 Proteins
This Unit studies 'proteins'. Starting with a simple analysis of the molecular make up, the Unit moves on to look at the importance of protein and how they are digested and absorbed
Author(s): The Open University

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Next steps
Genetic manipulation of crops is an issue of great current interest and controversy. This unit covers some of the basic science that underpins the debate and examines the hotly contested case study of the development of ‘Golden Rice’. By looking at the science 'behind the headlines' you will acquire a clearer idea of both what is possible in GM science and what may be desirable.
Author(s): The Open University

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1 The herbivores
From the mouse-deer to the elephant, plant eaters come in all shapes and sizes. But how do they manage to flourish on a salad diet? In this unit we will examine the special features that allow them to extract their nutrients from leaves, and see how some plants protect themselves from these predators. This is the fourth unit in the ‘Studying mammals’ series.
Author(s): The Open University

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Next steps
Ever wondered why rats, mice and squirrels seem to reproduce at such an alarming rate? Rodents are among the most successful of all the mammal groups. In this unit you will learn more about some of the evolutionary features that make these creatures so plentiful. This is the third unit in the ‘Studying mammals’ series.
Author(s): The Open University

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Next steps
James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) is arguably the father of electromagnetism, and unarguably one of the greatest physicists ever. Einstein called Maxwell's equations 'the most important event in physics since Newton's time, not only because of their wealth of content, but also because they form a pattern for a new type of law'. This unit will examine Maxwell's greatest triumph, the prediction that electromagnetic waves can propagate vast distances through empty space and the realisation that light
Author(s): The Open University

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7 Unit summary
James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) is arguably the father of electromagnetism, and unarguably one of the greatest physicists ever. Einstein called Maxwell's equations 'the most important event in physics since Newton's time, not only because of their wealth of content, but also because they form a pattern for a new type of law'. This unit will examine Maxwell's greatest triumph, the prediction that electromagnetic waves can propagate vast distances through empty space and the realisation that light
Author(s): The Open University

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5.1.4 Getting agreement with the no-monopole law
James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) is arguably the father of electromagnetism, and unarguably one of the greatest physicists ever. Einstein called Maxwell's equations 'the most important event in physics since Newton's time, not only because of their wealth of content, but also because they form a pattern for a new type of law'. This unit will examine Maxwell's greatest triumph, the prediction that electromagnetic waves can propagate vast distances through empty space and the realisation that light
Author(s): The Open University

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4 Maxwell's equations
James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) is arguably the father of electromagnetism, and unarguably one of the greatest physicists ever. Einstein called Maxwell's equations 'the most important event in physics since Newton's time, not only because of their wealth of content, but also because they form a pattern for a new type of law'. This unit will examine Maxwell's greatest triumph, the prediction that electromagnetic waves can propagate vast distances through empty space and the realisation that light
Author(s): The Open University

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3.3.2 A capacitor with time-varying charges on its plates
James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) is arguably the father of electromagnetism, and unarguably one of the greatest physicists ever. Einstein called Maxwell's equations 'the most important event in physics since Newton's time, not only because of their wealth of content, but also because they form a pattern for a new type of law'. This unit will examine Maxwell's greatest triumph, the prediction that electromagnetic waves can propagate vast distances through empty space and the realisation that light
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2