Global Climates and Seasons. A Look at Temperature and Precipitation
Several factors affect a region's climate and the number and types of seasons it experiences. Here students explore colorful animations of annual changes in temperature and precipitation.
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Utah For Sale
In this webquest we are going to pretend that the state of Utah is for sale. It is your job to inform potential buyers of the characteristics of the different types of environments they may want to purchase. You will be learning more about Utah's wetlands, forests, and deserts. Remember, you want to convince the class that your environment is the best place to live!
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What About Weather?
What would happen if you woke up this morning thinking it was going to be an ordinary day, but you looked outside and the weather was going crazy. The clouds were changing quickly and causing rain, hail, snow, and sleet. Lightning was striking all around your house. The sun was shinning one minute and the next minute it was dark as if it was the middle of the night because of the dark clouds. Hurricanes and tornadoes were being seen in places that have never seen them before. What would you do a
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Information and Communication Technology
This course traces the birth of information technology and briefly describes the concepts by linking it to the development of computers beginning with the first generation of computers. It introduces the learner to the basic working processes of a computer. It demonstrates how the memory and the processor coordinate activities based on instructions received from input devices or computer programs stored on the disk drive. This course discusses the different computer components and helps the lear
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Star Library: Regression on the Rebound
This activity is an advanced version of the “Keep your eyes on the ball” activity by Bereska, et al. (1999). Students should gain experience with differentiating between independent and dependent variables, using linear regression to describe the relationship between these variables, and drawing inference about the parameters of the population regression line. Each group of students collects data on the rebound heights of a ball dropped multiple times from each of several different heights.
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Igneous Rocks Tour
This module is designed to allow students to learn about igneous rocks at their own speed using images of hand samples and rock outcrops in their natural settings. Topics covered include the common igneous rock types, igneous textures, and intrusive rock bodies. Each topic has instructive text and several images. The site also features a self-quiz with 17 questions about 12 hand sample pictures. This site provides useful reference material suitable for high school or introductory college student
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What Does Math College Readiness Mean
Phil Daro, Mathematics Chair for the Common Core Standards Initiative, explains what is meant by the terms "college readiness" and "rigor."  A few examples are provided. (04:45)
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the concept of ’ (knowledge and understanding);

  • Engage with and review debates about selected key concepts relevant to the study of families and personal relationships;

  • Identify connections between concepts and the themes they raise for research and for social policy;

  • Understand some of the social processes underlying research around family issue
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3.2 Negative freedom

The concept of negative freedom centres on freedom from interference. This type of account of freedom is usually put forward in response to the following sort of question:

What is the area within which the subject – a person or group of persons – is or should be left to do or be what he is able to do or be, without interference by other persons?

(Berlin (1969), pp. 121–2; see, p. 155)


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3.6 Berlin criticised: one concept of freedom?

I've already mentioned that the most important feature of Berlin's article for our purposes is his distinction between negative and positive concepts of freedom: freedom from constraint, and the freedom that results from self-mastery or self-realisation. Most discussion of Berlin's article has also focused on this distinction. Now I want to consider a criticism of the distinction between two types of freedom.

The whole article rests on the assumption that we can make a meaningful distin
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4 Conclusion
Ever wondered what it would be like to study philosophy? This unit will introduce you to the teaching methods employed and the types of activities and assignments you would be asked to undertake should you wish to study the OU course A211 Philosophy and the human situation.
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1 Approaching philosophy
Ever wondered what it would be like to study philosophy? This unit will introduce you to the teaching methods employed and the types of activities and assignments you would be asked to undertake should you wish to study the OU course A211 Philosophy and the human situation.
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Ira Levin (1929–2007)
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1.1 A burst of evolution
Fossils are a glimpse into the distant past and fascinate young and old alike. This unit will introduce you to the explosion of evolution that took place during the Palaeozoic era. You will look at the many different types of creatures that existed at that time and how they managed to evolve to exist on land.
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5.3 The broad- and narrow-line regions
The field of active galaxies is recognised as one of increasing importance. But how do we know there are different kinds of galaxy? What are active galaxies? How are they powered? This unit examines the different types of active galaxy and looks at the crucial role of the active galactic nucleus and the energy source at its heart.
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7.2 Types of active galaxy
The field of active galaxies is recognised as one of increasing importance. But how do we know there are different kinds of galaxy? What are active galaxies? How are they powered? This unit examines the different types of active galaxy and looks at the crucial role of the active galactic nucleus and the energy source at its heart.
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6.2 Do supermassive black holes really exist?
The field of active galaxies is recognised as one of increasing importance. But how do we know there are different kinds of galaxy? What are active galaxies? How are they powered? This unit examines the different types of active galaxy and looks at the crucial role of the active galactic nucleus and the energy source at its heart.
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Introduction
Managing eutrophication is a key element in maintaining the earth's biodiversity. Eutrophication is a process mostly associated with human activity whereby ecosystems accumulate minerals. This unit explains how this process occurs, what its effects on different types of habitat are, and how it might be managed.
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4.3 Reducing the nutrient source
Managing eutrophication is a key element in maintaining the earth's biodiversity. Eutrophication is a process mostly associated with human activity whereby ecosystems accumulate minerals. This unit explains how this process occurs, what its effects on different types of habitat are, and how it might be managed.
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3.2 Anthropogenic sources of nutrients
Managing eutrophication is a key element in maintaining the earth's biodiversity. Eutrophication is a process mostly associated with human activity whereby ecosystems accumulate minerals. This unit explains how this process occurs, what its effects on different types of habitat are, and how it might be managed.
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