Factor Tree
This is a music video from Mr. Q-U-E's "2nd Period" DVD. Directed by Jimmy Pascascio.  This fun song is about factoring.  More songs can be found at www.musicnotesonline.com.  (03:06)
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Can China grow an Apple?
Dec. 7 - Upstart Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi is on track to post $2 billion in sales, with some tricks borrowed from Apple's playbook. But can it remain nimble in the big leagues? Jane Lanhee Lee reports.
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College Physics II
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This introductory, algebra-based, two-semester college physics book is grounded with real-world examples, illustrations, and explanations to help students grasp key, fundamental physics concepts. […]

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Naming Fractions - A Virtual Manipulative
Name the fraction corresponding to the highlighted portion of a shape. There are more instructions to the right of the manipulative.  Activities can be found above the workspace. 
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Consumer confidence on the rise
Dec. 27 - Summary of business headlines: Consumer confidence rebounds; Online post-holiday sales jump; Sears holdings to close up to 120 stores; Housing prices fall-S&P Case/Shiller. Bobbi Rebell reports.
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Building Climate Resilient Communities through Community Based Adaptation Planning and Action: Empir
By: UP Los Baños Presentation by Dr. Dharam Uprety, Forestry and Climate Change Manager, Multi Stakeholders Forestry Programme, Nepal. Delivered during the International Conference on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation for Food and Environmental Security, November 21-22, 2012 at SEARCA, UPLB, College, Laguna, Philippines.
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3.4 Outer electronic configurations and the Periodic Table

The essential message of Figure 22 is that the Groups of elements that appear in columns of the Periodic Table usually have atoms with similar outer electronic configurations. Figure 23 incorporates these configurations into our mini-Periodic Table of typical elements; they appear at the top of each Group. They imply that the typi
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3.3.1 Writing out electronic configurations

In Section 3.2, we described Figure 21 as an energy-level diagram, which represented the build-up of electronic configurations as electrons were inserted into sub-shells of progressively increasing energy. However, Figure 21 has been designed for just one purpose: to generate the correct electronic configurations in our tho
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1.7 Summary of Section 1

  • All materials are made of atoms of about 120 different chemical elements, each element being characterised by an atomic number which lies in the range 1–120.

  • Each atom has a nucleus where most of its mass resides. The atomic number is equal to the number of units of positive charge on the nucleus, the number of protons in the nucleus, and to the number of surrounding electrons in the neutral atom.

  • The nuclei of nearly all atom
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1.2 Chemical elements

Atoms of the same atomic number behave virtually identically in chemical reactions. They are therefore given the same chemical name and chemical symbol. For example, the atom of atomic number 6, which is shown in Figure 1, is a carbon atom, whose symbol is C. All materials are made of atoms, but there is a special class of substan
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References

American Heart Association (2006) ‘Heart disease and stroke statistics – 2006 update: A report from the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee’, Circulation, 113, pp. e85–e151.
Bandolier (2005) Statins: when should you take the tablet?Author(s): The Open University

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12 Glossary

You can access the unit glossary by clicking the link below.

Open glossary now...


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1.5 Arithmetic with real numbers

We can do arithmetic with recurring decimals by first converting the decimals to fractions. However, it is not obvious how to do arithmetic with non-recurring decimals. For example, assuming that we can represent and Author(s): The Open University

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8.2.2 The screen

You can see the calculations that you have entered as well as the answers. This means you can easily check whether you have made any mistakes.


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7.3 Square rooting a negative number

Another problem surfaces if you start with a negative number and try to find its square root. For example try to find the square root of 4 on your calculator. Depending upon how your calculator is set up, you may either get an error message or an unfamiliar number like 2i or 2j. This is because there is no real number which squared will give you the negative number 4. Every real number, whether positive or negative, has a positive square. There are some numbers, ca
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6.2 Getting the feel of big and small numbers

Very small and very large numbers can be difficult to comprehend. Nothing in our everyday experience helps us to get a good feel for them. For example numbers such as 1099 are so big that if Figure 1 was drawn to scale, you would be dealing with enormous distances. How big is big?

First express 1 000 000 000 in scientific notation as 109. Next, to find out how many times bigger 1099 is, use your calculator to divide 1099 by 109
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.


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1.4.3 Velocity

Another vector quantity which crops up frequently in applied mathematics is velocity. In everyday English, the words ‘speed’ and ‘velocity’ mean much the same as each other, but in scientific parlance there is a significant difference between them.

Velocity and speed

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1.2.1 Heating and cooling the Earth: the overall radiation balance

The Sun emits electromagnetic radiation with a range of wavelengths, but its peak emission is in the visible band – the sunlight that allows us to see. The wavelength of radiation has important climatic implications, as we shall see shortly. For now, we are mainly interested in the overall rate at which energy in the form of solar radiation reaches the Earth.

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