5.12 Interests

There is quite a lot to be said about the play, but in this unit I need to be selective. In the conversations that take place, one of the things that happens is that all sorts of interests unfold. There is a catalogue of benefits that could each potentially accrue to a long list of individuals and groups. We have the government that could gain benefits through ownership which would allow it to develop the device, understand threats, prevent development, protect the indigenous industry and ret
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5.9 Ethical reasoning

Now Ned's got three things. He's got the money that is presumably ‘good’. He's got his defence policy, which he thinks is ‘good’. Ros then introduces the well-being of the community. They are all ‘goods’ but each pulls in a different direction. Any judgement that Ned makes has to be based on an aggregation of these things. But, of course, these are quite different kinds of things, they are incommensurate, so adding up these things is not a straightforward proposition. Ros is hopin
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5.8 Rights

At the beginning of Act 2, Ned is quite explicit about not wanting to bargain over money. It is very clear he is bargaining over his right to control who uses what he sees as his technology, and his rights, he believes, will enable him to keep his weapon out of the hands of administrations that he does not really trust. So, at the centre of all this are the rights that appear to provide the means for Ned to control the distribution of devices embodying his idea, and that will allow him to pre
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5.7 The story so far

In Act 1 of Landscape with Weapon, Dan, the dentist, has been disturbed by the defence project that his brother is working on. Dan, however, is a fairly mercenary individual, so he feels that having had the idea, Ned should aim for a good return. The company is keen to exploit Ned's work, but Ned has resisted handing over the IP for his invention because he wants to control who gets access to the weapon system that his work has enabled.

In this Act Ned says weapons are empirical,
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5.5 Rhetorical devices

I talked a bit about Ned's motivations, but I am not quite sure about what he is trying to do to be persuasive. He has this interest in aesthetics, but in giving a detailed explanation of a military technology he is working on, he, from time to time, uses an analogy. One analogy he uses is the ‘flocking of starlings’, which illustrates rather the principle of operation of the technology and suggests that it is a kind of an existence proof. It implies this technology might actually work. B
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3.2 Relationships and ethics

Activity 12

Read the script of the audio play Call Waiting attached below. Jot down some answers to the following questions:

  1. What is valued in the play?

  2. What action is taken?<
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1.8 ‘Ethics’, ‘ethical’ and authority

There is some confusion over the uses of the terms ‘ethical’ and ‘ethics’. Often people use the adjective ‘ethical’ to signal things that they would expect virtuous people to do. That is they use the word ‘ethical’ instead of ‘good’. Companies, institutions and even governments might claim to have ‘ethical’ policies. Probably such a policy declares the ideology. For example, saying that ‘sustainability is ethical’ may be part of an individual's ethic but it is a ta
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6.8 Anticipating the arguments

  • 18. Have the objectives and perspectives of all the key stakeholders concerned with the decision been taken account of in the previous assessment of costs, benefits and risks?

  • 19. What are the reasons that this proposal is preferred over other op
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4.1 Background to Vue

This section discusses one of four video case studies used in the T883 course to illustrate some basic concepts of operations management covered by the course.

Vue Entertainment is a relatively young organisation, formed in 2003 with the acquisition of 36 cinemas from the Warner Village chain. At the time of writing (October 2007) it currently operates 579 screens and 130,585 seats over 59 cinemas. It sees its approach as firmly based upon its desire to consistently provide ‘the best
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3.4 Managing across interfaces

Increasingly, operations management is seen as an interface discipline (Voss, 1995). Managing across interfaces, both internal and external to the organisation, is a particular challenge for managers and this is discussed further in this section.

Information and communications technology is an important means of linking across the various interfaces. Author(s): The Open University

8.3.1 Fluorine-based etching of silicon

Given the noxious chemistry needed to etch silicon with a liquid, it is perhaps surprising that a gas can do the job at all. However, both xenon fluoride (XeF2) and chlorine trifluoride (ClF3) gases have been used successfully for just this purpose. Each acts as a source of fluorine atoms, which are just barely bound together into molecules and are easily rearranged around silicon atoms with which they form strong bonds, turning them into inert SiF4 gas. These
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7.4.4 Plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD)

In PECVD a plasma is initiated in the CVD chamber, usually by supplying an RF voltage to the platen on which the wafer sits – the chamber geometry is similar to a reactive ion etch chamber. Ions are accelerated from this plasma onto the wafer surface, so that the CVD reaction is initiated not only by heating the wafer, but also by the energy imparted as the ions land. This allows high-quality film deposition at much lower wafer temperatures and higher deposition rates than unenhanced CVD, w
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7.4 Depositing compounds

As well as conducting metal layers, device fabrication requires dielectric, insulating materials and these are mostly chemical compounds rather than simple elements or alloys. By far the most widely used of these is silicon oxide (either as a glass or as crystalline quartz), but other oxides and nitrides are also common, plus polymers and a selection of more exotic materials.

Such compounds generally have very high melting points, or decompose under heating, so cannot be deposited by ev
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7.3.4 Physical vapour deposition (PVD), sputtering

An ion hitting a metal surface after acceleration through more than 100 V will not stick or bounce off but will burrow into the surface, splashing atoms outwards. This is known as sputtering and provides a versatile alternative to thermal evaporation for metal-vapour deposition: more controllable, with adjustable uniformity, able to cope with alloys and high-melting-point metals and suitable for production-line automation. Given these advantages, it is also worth the effort to heat the
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6.6 Oscillators in general

Although this section has dealt only with mass-spring systems, the analysis can be extended to any system where there is an oscillating driving force acting on a mass which is located by a restoring force. In fact, the analysis is even more general than this and can be applied to electronic networks where voltages and currents oscillate in much the same way as the mass on the spring.


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6.2 Natural frequency of free oscillations

Most of us have a fairly accurate understanding of what is meant by resonance – it's what causes a bell to continue to make a sound long after it has been struck. Yet this is just one example of resonance, a phenomenon that occurs in nature in a surprisingly large number of places.

It is all to do with the reversible transfer of energy from one form to another in a system. The common feature associated with mechanical systems that are able to store energy by oscillating is that they h
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5.2 Material comparisons

I want to depart from the specific example of the bicycle to make some more general points.

In most simple structural analysis the self-weight of the structure is ignored, as it is considered to be small in comparison with the loads carried. However, as an illustration of engineering practice in the search for efficient structures to employ in product design, it is worth examining how the strength and weight of particular materials compare.

These comparisons are illustrated throug
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2.5 Making multiple copies

Berliner was aware that Edison had problems duplicating cylinders. Initially copies were made from a master cylinder using a mechanical engraving process. Unfortunately this method caused the master cylinder to wear out after making just a few copies, so performers had to be asked to record several masters to ensure enough cylinders could be duplicated. An improved recording system allowed multiple master cylinders to be made by feeding several recording phonographs from one horn, but the cyl
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1 Capturing sound

Have you ever listened carefully to a recording of your own voice?

In this first activity, I want you to make a short recording of your voice.

Activity 1 (Optional)

Note: This optional activity requires the use of a
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