NASA CONNECT Geometry of Exploration: Eyes Over Mars
In NASA CONNECT Geometry of Exploration: Eyes Over Mars, students examine how the principles of geometry and linear and angular measurements are used to survey and map the Earth and other planets. A surveyor explains how locations like football or soccer fields and describes the tools and techniques used. Students also learn how NASA researchers use geometric shapes to navigate spacecraft to Mars and how satellites, like the Mars Global Surveyor, and the principles of geometry, are used to deter
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The Carolina Room
Modern-day curators focus on reversible restoration techniques. Conservator Shelley Svoboda describes the renewal of the Carolina Room.
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Evaluation of 'Advanced Database Management' module
This paper focuses on a discussion on the approach taken in analysing evaluation design for a specific faculty module on enterprise education
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Evaluation
This PowerPoint presentation considers why to evaluate and different approaches to evaluation
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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7 Final thoughts
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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6.3 Some issues for consideration
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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6.2 How DEMOCS works
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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6.1 Introduction
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.6 How valuable have consensus conferences proved to be?
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.4 Consensus conference on plant biotechnology
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.2 Public consultation vs public engagement
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 Introduction
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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2 What should dialogue with the public aim to achieve?
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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1 How did the notion of public dialogue arise?
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

This unit introduces common techniques underlying free verse and traditional forms of poetry, and how it is necessary to use these techniques in order to harness what T.S. Eliot called the ‘logic of the imagination’ (Eliot, 1975, p. 77). We discuss the possibility of using your own experience, but also the power of imagination, and of utilising different personae in your poems. You are also introduced to the basic terminology and practical elements of poetry – the line, line-breaks
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9 Notes to help you complete your assessment
Numerical and mathematical skills are used to describe and tackle a wide range of problems. These key skills are about understanding when particular techniques should be used, how to carry them out accurately and which techniques should be applied in particular situations. Developing your numerical, graphical and algebraic skills means being able to plan how you are going to use your skills over a period of time, monitoring your progress and then reviewing your approach. In developing and assess
Author(s): The Open University

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8 Part B: Evidencing your number skills
Numerical and mathematical skills are used to describe and tackle a wide range of problems. These key skills are about understanding when particular techniques should be used, how to carry them out accurately and which techniques should be applied in particular situations. Developing your numerical, graphical and algebraic skills means being able to plan how you are going to use your skills over a period of time, monitoring your progress and then reviewing your approach. In developing and assess
Author(s): The Open University

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7.4 Evaluating your strategy and assessing your work
Numerical and mathematical skills are used to describe and tackle a wide range of problems. These key skills are about understanding when particular techniques should be used, how to carry them out accurately and which techniques should be applied in particular situations. Developing your numerical, graphical and algebraic skills means being able to plan how you are going to use your skills over a period of time, monitoring your progress and then reviewing your approach. In developing and assess
Author(s): The Open University

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7.3 Monitoring your progress
Numerical and mathematical skills are used to describe and tackle a wide range of problems. These key skills are about understanding when particular techniques should be used, how to carry them out accurately and which techniques should be applied in particular situations. Developing your numerical, graphical and algebraic skills means being able to plan how you are going to use your skills over a period of time, monitoring your progress and then reviewing your approach. In developing and assess
Author(s): The Open University

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7.2 Developing a strategy
Numerical and mathematical skills are used to describe and tackle a wide range of problems. These key skills are about understanding when particular techniques should be used, how to carry them out accurately and which techniques should be applied in particular situations. Developing your numerical, graphical and algebraic skills means being able to plan how you are going to use your skills over a period of time, monitoring your progress and then reviewing your approach. In developing and assess
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2