5.4 Evaluating accessibility
It is part of a teaching professional’s skills to understand the needs of a diverse population of students. This unit introduces the challenges for disabled students who may use computers in different ways when taking part in eLearning or may need alternative teaching methods. It covers the technology and techniques used by disabled students, the adjustments to teaching methods that might be reasonable, design decisions which affect the accessibility of eLearning tools and strategies for evalu
Author(s): The Open University

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9.1 What is a state machine?
Models are mechanisms for communication. This unit looks at what a model is and what the process of modelling is about. The techniques discussed here are applicable to a wide range of systems and have one thing in common: they are all commonly used diagramming techniques. The five techniques are: data flow diagrams, use case modelling, activity diagrams, entity–relationship diagrams and state machines.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.1 Knowledge about context and author
This unit is essential reading if you want to look at, and think about, people's ideas, practices and products to try to understand what they mean. Developing your skill in analysis–interpretation–evaluation and communication is a good and worthwhile investment. Aimed at learners of arts and humanities subjects, you will find this unit invaluable whether you are new to study or more experienced.
Author(s): The Open University

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8 Conclusion
Are you interested in creating your own open educational resources? This unit will help you to write a learning unit and provide you with links to various resources for open-learning materials. You will learn about the different purposes of self-instruction and receive advice about the techniques and strategies to help the learner.
Author(s): The Open University

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Colloquium Week 5: "Funding Conservation and Development in the Dominican Republic"
A Paper detailing fieldwork analysing funding for conservation and development in the Dominican Republic The debate over the best way to conserve biological resources while allowing for the development of communities that live around or in and work with those resources has long been contentious. The degree to which forest residents, subsistence farmers, and indigenous tribes degrade or protect biodiversity remains unresolved, as does the best way to merge the interests and needs of communities i
Author(s): Laura Sauls

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Rights not set

TALAT Lecture 4300: Beam Welding Processes of Aluminium
This lecture gives a brief introduction to beam welding and cutting techniques of aluminium; it describes the process principle of electron and laser beam welding and cutting of aluminium; it gives some information about the choice of welding and cutting parameters; it also gives information about the weldability of aluminium alloys with electron beam welding. General mechanical engineering background and basic knowledge of electron and laser beam physics is assumed.
Author(s): TALAT,Ulrich Krüger, Schweißtechnische Lehr-und

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NASA CONNECT Geometry of Exploration: Eyes Over Mars
In NASA CONNECT Geometry of Exploration: Eyes Over Mars, students examine how the principles of geometry and linear and angular measurements are used to survey and map the Earth and other planets. A surveyor explains how locations like football or soccer fields and describes the tools and techniques used. Students also learn how NASA researchers use geometric shapes to navigate spacecraft to Mars and how satellites, like the Mars Global Surveyor, and the principles of geometry, are used to deter
Author(s): No creator set

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The Carolina Room
Modern-day curators focus on reversible restoration techniques. Conservator Shelley Svoboda describes the renewal of the Carolina Room.
Author(s): No creator set

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Evaluation of 'Advanced Database Management' module
This paper focuses on a discussion on the approach taken in analysing evaluation design for a specific faculty module on enterprise education
Author(s): Creator not set

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Evaluation
This PowerPoint presentation considers why to evaluate and different approaches to evaluation
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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7 Final thoughts
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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6.3 Some issues for consideration
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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6.2 How DEMOCS works
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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6.1 Introduction
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.6 How valuable have consensus conferences proved to be?
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.4 Consensus conference on plant biotechnology
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.2 Public consultation vs public engagement
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 Introduction
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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2 What should dialogue with the public aim to achieve?
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

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1 How did the notion of public dialogue arise?
There are a wide range of interactions between ‘science’ and ‘the public’. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be ‘passive’. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more ‘active’ in the direction of science practice by ‘two-way’ interactions, with dialogue taking place between
Author(s): The Open University

License information
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2