Building Climate Resilient Communities through Community Based Adaptation Planning and Action: Empir
By: UP Los Baños Presentation by Dr. Dharam Uprety, Forestry and Climate Change Manager, Multi Stakeholders Forestry Programme, Nepal. Delivered during the International Conference on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation for Food and Environmental Security, November 21-22, 2012 at SEARCA, UPLB, College, Laguna, Philippines.
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The future of the European Union after the euro crisis: Political union and its discontents [Audio]
Speaker(s): Ulrike Guérot, Mark Leonard, Anthony Teasdale, José Ignacio Torreblanca | The euro crisis has dealt a powerful blow to the EU’s political system. Many European leaders have been ousted, more radical parties are becoming more powerful, and questions are increasingly being asked about the legitimacy of the European Union. European leaders find themselves trapped between the need for a more integrated Europe and the demands of voters: the necessity and impossibility of "more Europe"
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Introduction

This unit is from our archive. It is an adapted extract from the Science (S365) module that is no longer in presentation. If you wish to study formally at The Open University, you may wish to explore the courses we offer in this Curriculum Area

This unit is concerned with macroevo
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4.2 Intermediate forms

In essence, the argument about intermediate forms runs as follows. If whales evolved from a terrestrial ancestor through the accumulation of small differences over time, we should expect to find the fossils of a number of ‘missing links’, i.e. creatures with a mixture of terrestrial and aquatic characteristics. In fact, we might expect to find a succession of such animals, each a little bit more whale-like and a little bit less well adapted to life on land than its predecessor.

To m
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2.7 … and becoming more intelligent

Intelligence is a useful commodity: it can help an animal to make sense of its environment and cope with the demands of social behaviour (including courtship and competition). Hunters tend to be relatively intelligent, and otters, pinnipeds and cetaceans, for example, share a playful curiosity that is characteristic of animals that catch other animals for a living. Some especially extravagant claims have been made for the intelligence of the toothed whales, largely because these animals use c
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2.2 Breathing air

A swimming elephant can breathe by holding the end of its trunk out of the water, but if it tried to find its food under the surface, like the desman, it would have to hold its breath. Neither the mammalian lung nor the skin can extract enough oxygen from water to sustain life, so aquatic mammals must come to the surface at intervals to breathe; and all of them – pinnipeds, sirenians and cetaceans – drown if they are prevented from doing so for prolonged periods.

Lungs form 7% of th
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2.1 Land versus water

Mammals share a number of biological characteristics that mark them out as members of the class Mammalia. Many of these are adaptations to a life on land. For example:

  • Mammals give birth to young at a relatively advanced stage of development and feed their young on milk.

  • Most mammals have hair, or fur, covering part or all of the body.

  • Mammals have a high metabolic rate and maintain a relatively high and constant body temp
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7.2.1 The equilibrium constant

An expression for the equilibrium constant of a reaction can be put together from the concentrations of the reactants and products at equilibrium. A concentration of a reactant or product is represented by enclosing its chemical formula in square brackets. Thus, the concentration of NO(g) is written [NO(g)].

To write down the equilibrium constant of a reaction, we start with the concentrations of the products. Each one is raised to the power of the number that precedes it in the reactio
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6.3.1 Refinements and difficulties

In Section 6.2, we said that inter-axis repulsions vary in the order:

non-bonded pair–non-bonded pair > non-bonded pair–bond pair > bond pair–bond pair

There is evidence for this in the inter-bond angles in molecules. For example, in wat
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3.2 The electronic configurations of atoms

The quantum theory of the atom tells us that we cannot say exactly where an electron in an atom will be at any particular moment; we can speak only of the probability of finding an electron at a particular point. So the precise orbits shown in the Rutherford model of Figure 1 misrepresent the arrangement of electrons about
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5.3 Powers

Having discussed nth roots, we are now in a position to define the expression ax, where a is positive and x is a rational power (or exponent).

Definition

If a > 0, m Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

This unit explores reasons for studying mathematics, practical applications of mathematical ideas and aims to help you to recognize mathematics when you come across it. It introduces the you to the graphics calculator, and takes you through a series of exercises from the Calculator Book, Tapping into Mathematics With the TI-83 Graphics Calculator. The unit ends by asking you to reflect on the process of studying mathematics.

In order to complete this unit you will need
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4 Proofs in group theory

In Section 4 we prove that some of the properties of the groups appearing earlier in the unit are, in fact, general properties shared by all groups. In particular, we prove that in any group the identity element is unique, and that each element has a unique inverse.

Click 'View document' below to open Section 4 (9 pages, 237KB).

6 Curves from parameters

In Section 5 we show how functions may be used to sketch curves in the plane, even when these curves are not necessarily the graphs of functions.

Click 'View document' below to open Section 5 (8 pages, 151KB).

3.4 Drawing and interpreting graphs

A graph shows the relationship between two quantities. These quantities may be very different: for instance, the price of coffee in relation to different years, or the braking distance of a car in relation to different speeds, or the height of a child at different ages. Because the quantities are different, there is no need to have equal scales on the graph, and it is often impractical to do so. However, it is essential that the scales are shown on the axes: they should indicate exactly what
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should:

  • be able to solve homogeneous second-order equations;

  • know a general method for constructing solutions to inhomogeneous linear constant-coefficient second-order equations;

  • know about initial and boundary conditions to obtain particular values of constants in the general solution of second-order differential equations.


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First-order differential equations

This unit introduces the topic of differential equations. The subject is developed without assuming that you have come across it before, but it is taken for granted that you have a basic grounding in calculus. In particular, you will need to have a good grasp of the basic rules for differentiation and integration.

This unit is an adapted extract from the course Mathematical methods and
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Introduction

In this unit you will see first how to convert vectors from geometric form, in terms of a magnitude and direction, to component form, and then how conversion in the opposite sense is accomplished. The ability to convert between these different forms of a vector is useful in certain problems involving displacement and velocity, as shown in Section 2, in which you will also work with bearings.

This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course
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2 Your own mathematics

It is crucial to remember that you are a learner of mathematics as well as a teacher. In this unit you will be asked to undertake some mathematical tasks. The aim of these tasks is not to improve your mathematics, but to give you experience of doing mathematics for yourself—experience that you can reflect upon subsequently. The reflection is used to develop your awareness of the ways that learners deal with mathematical tasks, and how learners' mathematical thinking is influenced by the way
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1 Forces for development

Working in mathematics education involves a sense of both past and future, and how the two combine to influence the present. It may seem that, because the past has already happened, it cannot be altered; however, you can alter how you perceive the past, and what lessons you take from it. Each of us has a personal past in mathematics education—the particular events of our personal lives, who taught us, where, what and how they taught us, and what we took from the experiences. Each of us also
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