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3.7 Analytical notation
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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3.6 A second reduction: analytical levels
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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3.5 Making a foreground reduction
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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3.4 The concept of prolongation
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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3.3 Categories of dissonance in tonal music
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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3.2 Simple reductive processes
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 Introduction to the elements of voice-leading analysis
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Listening for lines within the harmony
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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2.1 Two examples
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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1.4 Some introductory listening
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3 The origins of voice-leading analysis
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Analysing harmony
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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1.1 Overview of Mozart's sonatas
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction
This unit introduces ‘voice-leading’ or ‘Schenkerian’ analysis, perhaps the most widely-used and discussed method of analysing tonal music. In this unit, this method is explained through the analysis of piano sonatas by Mozart. The unit is the first in the AA314 series of three units on this form of harmonic analysis, and concentrates on the ‘foreground level’ of voice leading. As you work through this unit, you will become familiar with five complete movements of Mozart’s piano
Author(s): The Open University

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5.3.3 Phosphorylation of proteins as a means of regulating activity
In this unit we explore how proteins are the 'doers' of the cell. They are huge in number and variety and diverse in structure and function, serving both the structural building blocks and the functional machinery of the cell. Just about every process in every cell requires specific proteins. The basic principles of protein structure and function which are reviewed in this unit are crucial to understanding how proteins perform their various roles.
Author(s): The Open University

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21A.215 Medical Anthropology (MIT)
Examination of how medicine is practiced cross-culturally, with particular emphasis on Western biomedicine. Analysis of medical practice as a cultural system, focusing on the human, as opposed to the biological, side of things. Also, examines how we and people in other cultures think of disease, health, body, and mind.
Author(s): Jackson, Jean E. (Jean Elizabeth), 1943-

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Virtual Maths, Shapes Space and Measure, Surface of a semi cylinder template
Diagram and template for using a semi-cylinder to calculate area
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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Virtual Maths, Calculating the Volume of a Brick
How to calculate the volume of a brick, guide (pdf)
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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A Handbook for Collecting Releve Data in Minnesota
The exercise describes releve field methods and discusses the multivariate analysis of releve data. The application of releve data to problems of habitat evaluation, forest inventory, and research projects in Minnesota was presented by experts from the Minnesota Natural Heritage Program, the Minnesota County Biological Survey, and the Univ. of Minnesota. All participants received a releve handbook that covered the history of the method, field instructions, data-entry forms, and an overview of a
Author(s): No creator set

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Using the General Social Survey to Investigate Social Relationships
In the first part of this exercise, students will learn (1) how to do preliminary data analysis using the General Social Survey (GSS); and (2) how to examine relationships between social constructs empirically. To carry out this study, whey will follow the basic procedures in social research and apply the concepts and techniques that have been discussed in class.
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