2.6.3 Re-working Hansa's essay

Now we have looked at Philip's and Hansa's essays in such detail, what have we learned? Perhaps the best way to answer that is to write another version of the essay, building on all the things we have discussed. In fact, I have taken the basic content of Hansa's essay, tidied it up and shuffled it about a little to bring out her argument more strongly. (However this is not the only possible way of structuring an argument in answer to this question.) I have also woven in some of Ellis's terms,
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1.3 Attending to sounds

From the earlier sections, you will appreciate that the auditory system is able to separate different, superimposed sounds on the basis of their different source directions. This makes it possible to attend to any one sound without confusion, and we have the sensation of moving our ‘listening attention’ to focus on the desired sound. For example, as I write this I can listen to the quiet hum of the computer in front of me, or swing my attention to the bird song outside the window to my ri
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1.2 Disentangling sounds

If you are still feeling aggrieved about the shortcomings of evolution, then you might take heart from the remarkable way in which the auditory system has evolved so as to avoid a serious potential problem. Unlike our eyes, our ears cannot be directed so as to avoid registering material that we wish to ignore; whatever sounds are present in the environment, we must inevitably be exposed to them. In a busy setting such as a party we are swamped by simultaneous sounds – people in different pa
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2.6 Environmental explanations of dyslexia?

‘Environment’ is often used to refer to only social or non-biological influences. However, it actually also refers to the biological, cognitive and behavioural environments that we may be exposed to. If you refer back to Frith's framework (see Figure 2) you will remember that the environment can be h
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2.3.1 Behaviour

First, for many decades, ‘behaviour’ has provided the most dominant kind of evidence – what people and animals can be seen to do. Behaviour can cover a very wide range of activities. Think about examples such as a rat finding its way through a maze to a pellet of food, a participant in a memory experiment writing down words five minutes after having done a memorising task, a small group of children who are observed whilst they, jointly, use a computer to solve a problem, a teenager admi
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1.4 The diversity of psychology

Since psychology is concerned with the full range of what makes us human, it is not surprising that the scope of the discipline is extensive. Psychology has always been a diverse, multi-perspective discipline. This partly results from its origins. Psychological questions were asked first by philosophers, then increasingly by biologists, physiologists and medical scientists. The diverse origins of psychology are visible if we consider four ‘founders’ of psychology – all of whom produced
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2 How to start SPSS

Activity 1

0 hours 20 minutes

This activity shows you how to start the SPSS software, navigate a computer desktop to find a file called Trends chapter 14, and then open it.

You will be requ
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4.4.5 Do – provide information

Clear information for students and advisors is essential. Disabled students need to know whether they can complete all the learning objectives and what adjustments they can expect. They need this information in good time before they start the course so that they can plan ahead. We have more to say on this subject in the section, ‘Informing students’.


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3.3.1 Colour-blindness

People who are colour-blind cannot distinguish between certain ranges of colour. The most common form is red-green colour-blindness. People with red-green colourblindness do not see these colours in the same way as most people do, and cannot distinguish between them. Approximately 1 in 10 men and 1 in 200 women are affected by red-green colour-blindness. Colour-blindness is either inherited or is caused by an underlying eye condition, such as macular degeneration (BBC, 2005, ‘Men's health
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3.3 Visual impairment

There are approximately two million people in the UK who have a sight problem. The Royal National Institute of the Blind (RNIB) defines someone as having a sight problem if they are unable to recognise someone across the road or they have difficulty reading newsprint even when wearing glasses (RNIB, 2005, ‘About sight loss – changing the way we think about blindness’).

When discussing visually impaired people it is important to distinguish between partially sighted people (also kn
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2.1.2 Disability

Any restriction or lack (resulting from an impairment) of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being.


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3.1 What the review is about

‘The performance review process enables me to have a meaningful discussion about issues at the heart of the improvement of the school, with governors who support me yet make me stop and think about why I do what I do and, more importantly, how I might do my job better.’

Quote from headteacher

The review of the headteacher's performance is one of the most important tasks for the governing bo
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1 Performance management

Figure 1

Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will:

  • be able to state your own motivation for producing self-study Open Educational Resources (OERs);

  • have investigated and analysed some of the research into online learning;

  • have evaluated some examples of educational resources for active open learning;

  • be able to plan a structured learning experience using a range of resources;

  • be able to construct an OpenLearn-style unit by remixing res
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2 Finding evidence

If the purpose of monitoring is to ensure that policies and plans are being put into action, it follows that governors should be focusing their attention on finding evidence that supports this.

Governors are not inspectors, and need to be aware of the danger that they could impinge on the role of the headteacher through inappropriate involvement in day-to-day monitoring, rather than operating at the strategic level.

How monitoring is undertaken is a matter for each individual gove
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1.7. Resources for further study

Books

  • Potter, S. (1950) Our Language, Penguin.

  • McCrum, R., MacNeil, R., and Cran, W. (2003) The Story of English, Penguin.

  • Stevenson, V. (1983) Words, Mcdonald.

  • Bryson, B. (1991) Mother Tongue, Penguin.

  • Any title by David Crystal.

Reference books

  • Onions, C.T. (1966) The Oxford
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Introduction

This unit looks at visualisation as it relates to mathematics, focusing upon how it can be used to improve learning. It will also identify ways in which to make more use of visualisation within the classroom.


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References

Asimov, I., ‘In my Own View’ in ed. Beare, H. (2001), The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Quoted from ‘Education, Technology and Change’ by Megan Blair (accessed on 22 September, 2005).
http://www.cybertext.net.au/tct2002/disc_papers/organisation/blair.htm
DfES (2002), Extended schools: providing opportunities and services for all, p. 6.
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References

Birkett, D. (2001) ‘The school we'd like’, The Guardian, 5 June 2001. Available from: http://education.guardian.co.uk/schools/story/0,5500,501374,00.html [Accessed 23 November 2003].
Brown, P. (2001) ‘The erosion of geography’, The Guardian, 20 November 2001. Available from: www.education.guardian.co.uk/schools/story/0,5500,597485,00.html [Accessed 20 November 2003].
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2. Does art have a value?

Art has been described as an open concept: a cumulative and developing category of objects and processes, which by its nature is not easily definable. Therefore it might be more relevant to consider how art based activities enhance human aptitudes, abilities and skills.

Some of the skills and values gained from the study of art and art history are listed below. For present purposes these can be subdivided into those that are intrinsic (undertaken for their own sake) and those tha
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