How GE Builds Global Leaders: A Conversation with Chief Learning Officer Susan Peters
In recent years, GE has faced severe business challenges -- the company's $200 billion market cap is half of what it used to be. Still, an area of enormous strength is the way the company identifies and builds leaders. Much of the credit goes to GE's corporate learning programs, executed through a learning facility in Crotonville, N.Y. As business becomes more global, how is leadership development at GE changing? How does GE use technology to teach leadership? What impact will the influx of the
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Living in an era of global terror
 Professor Richard Aldrich

In this podcast, Professor Richard Aldrich from the School of Politics and International Relations, discusses the impact of globalisation, the opportunities this affords to global terrorists and the challenges faced by the intelligence services.

Globalisation has led to a free flow of money, people and ideas, which has benefited many people in the West in recent years and
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Upping the ante
 In this podcast reaction to Russian plans to enhance military and "strategic nuclear" capabilities.

Professor Stefan Wolff looks at the motives for this announcement and what implications it has for the region and for the rest of the world.

Professor Wolff is Professor of Political Science in the School of Politics and International Relations and Director of the Centre for International Crisis Management
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Greening Aid? Understanding the Environmental Impact of Development Assistance

Greening Aid? Understanding the Environmental Impact of Development Assistance, A lecture delivered for UC Irvine's International Studies Public Forum (ISPF).

Michael J. Tierney is the Hylton Associate Professor of Government and the Director of the International Relations Program at the College of William and Mary. He received his B.A. in government from William and Mary in 1987 and Ph.D. from U.C. San Diego in 2003. Professor Tierney’s research and teaching interests focus on inte
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Political Science 129: Latinos & 2008 Election
This course analyzes the strategies used by Latinos to influence outcomes in the 2008 Elections as well as efforts by candidates, campaigns, and political parties to mobilize Latino voters. We will use 2008 as a case study to analyze the broader influence of Latinos on U.S. electoral politics and to evaluate how the structure of contemporary U.S. elections benefits cohesive electorates and disadvantages more marginalized populations. The class will be organized around three broad themes. First
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Criminology, Law and Society C219: Hate Crimes
Examines the causes and consequences of hate crimes as well as the larger soical land political context in which they occur. Considers the dynamics and politics of violence stemming from bigotry and discrimination, as well as the social policies designed to control it.
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Political Science 126A: Mexican-Americans & Politics
Political Science 126A, Mexican-Americans & Politics also cross listed as Chicano/Latino Studies 143, Mexican-Americans & Politics This course examines the role of Mexican American and other Latino communities in shaping state and national politics in the United States. After we review the political history and political organizational strategies of Mexican Americans, we will examine their contemporary modes of political organization; analyze public policy issues that concern them; evaluate the
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Greening Aid? Understanding the Environmental Impact of Development Assistance

"Greening Aid? Understanding the Environmental Impact of Development Assistance"

An International Studies Public Forum at UC Irvine on Thursday, February 4, 2010 with with Michael J. Tierney, College of William and Mary. Michael J. Tierney is the Hylton Associate Professor of Government and the Director of the International Relations Program at the College of William and Mary. He received his B.A. in government from William and Mary in 1987 and Ph.D. from U.C. San Diego in 2003.


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Planning, Policy and Design 139: Water Resource Policy

Water is the economic, social, and physical lifeblood of humanity, providing the bases for agriculture, industry, transportation, energy production, and life itself. Despite its importance, alarming signs suggest that there are looming threats to this vital resource. The World Resources Institute contends that the world's thirst for water is likely to become one of the most pressing issues this century due to population growth, drought, and climate change. The World Bank reports that many dev
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Approaches to Managing Health Services Organizations
Healthcare professionals around the world are experiencing increasing pressures from patients, communities, governments and payers to demonstrate value.
Author(s): David Peters

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the Johns Hopkins University and individual authors unless otherwise noted. JHSPH OpenCourseWare materials are licensed under a Creative Commons License

Against Isolationism: James F. Byrnes Refutes Lindbergh
The interwar peace movement was arguably the largest mass movement of the 1920s and 1930s, a mobilization often overlooked in the wake of the broad popular consensus that ultimately supported the U.S. involvement in World War II. The destruction wrought in World War I (known in the 1920s and 1930s as the "Great War") and the cynical nationalist politics of the Versailles Treaty had left Americans disillusioned with the Wilsonian crusade to save the world for democracy. Senate investigations of w
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A Pledge of Allegiance: Joining the Grange
When the National Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry was first organized in Minnesota in December 1867, its goals were primarily social and educational. The organization spread rapidly throughout the agricultural Midwest, attracting more than 850,000 members by 1875. The Grange's purpose also expanded--it experimented (unsuccessfully) with cooperatives, and, angered by hard times, tight money, and high railroad shipping rates, moved into politics. Members elected sympathetic state legislators wh
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"A Modern School": Abraham Flexner Outlines Progressive Education
In the early 20th century, an impressive array of intellectuals, social critics, and grassroots activists came together to launch a progressive education movement that sought broad-based change in American educational practice. At the heart of the progressive program lay a pedagogy that emphasized flexibility and critical thinking. This was coupled with the belief that schools should establish organic relationships with their communities, that curricula should confront broad social issues, and t
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Addressing Social Inequality in Chiapas through Local, Healthy and Clean Foods: An Agroecological Vi
In Chiapas, one of the poorest states in Mexico, an estimated 150,000 children are malnourished. To end this problem, governments have implemented food security policies, including food importation and industrial food production. In 2008 alone, Mexico imported 20 million tons of food. While these policies certainly help to remedy the problem in the short term, the massive importation of basic foodstuffs and incentives to industrial agriculture may widen social inequality, threaten health
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"A German Beer Garden on Sunday Evening."
Between 1820 and 1860, 1,500,000 immigrants arrived in America from Germany. Many of the new arrivals who settled in cities such as New York worked as shopkeepers and skilled tradesmen, although many more worked as employees in construction, brewing, and manufacturing. Although German immigrants did not mix politics and liquor, reformers were disconcerted by the atmosphere of their social establishments. Unlike the bars in Irish neighborhoods, the beer gardens catered to whole families. As this
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A Clear and Present Danger: The Chinese Exclusion Act
The San Francisco Building Trades Council (BTC), organized in 1898, actively participated in the anti-Asian agitation that characterized California politics, particularly labor politics, in the late-19th century. The BTC, like the national American Federation of Labor (AFL), argued that the very presence of Chinese (and, after 1900, Japanese and Korean immigrants as well) dragged down the living standards of white workers. The following excerpt is from a 1902 AFL pamphlet entitled Some Reasons f
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Topics in Pre-Modern Japanese History
This book emphasizes a succession of topics rather than strict adherence to the flow of time. The chapters move from earlier periods of time to later periods of time, but their content and organization gives top priority to coverage of topics. While the "mainstream" narrative of politics and institutions is present in these pages, the emphasis is on social and cultural history wherever possible.
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Let's Talk Politics: Berkeley Repertory Theatre
Acclaimed British playwright David Edgar takes aim at American politics with his two-play cycle, Continental Divide, at Berkeley Repertory Theatre. This Educator Guide explores the history of political activism and political theatre in the UK and the US.
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Conversations with Berkeley Faculty: Ira Lapidus (1/14/03)
Conversations with History Presents Faculty Research at the University of California, Berkeley A Conversation with Ira Lapidus Professor Emeritus of History "Islamic Societies" This interview took place on January 14, 2003. Complete transcript is available. Ira Lapidus, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of California, Berkeley, and the founding Chair of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies on the Berkeley campus. Professor Lapidus has traveled extensively across the Muslim worl
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Question of the Day: ANWR Drilling Policy
This "Question of the Day" activity asks students to examine two policy positions regarding drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) as a part of the interplay between science and politics. The students also determine their viewpoint on the issue and share/defend it with their peers. This site offers teaching notes and tips, downloadable materials, and links to additional online references and resources.
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