Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 8329 result(s) returned

2.3 Objective conditions and subjective definitions

Activity 4

2 hours 0 minutes

Reread the story about the three baseball umpires, which you'll find on page 11 of ‘What do we mean by “Constructive social work”?’


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

8.3 The politics of devolution

This unit examines ‘Scotland’. Having enjoyed political independence until 1707, the survival of many of Scotland's institutions – notably its systems of law, religion and education – after Union with England contributed to the preservation of its singular identity. The different way in which Scotland was incorporated into the UK, through a monarchical take-over rather than by conquest (as was the case in Wales and Ireland), may account for the lesser impact the development of the UK
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

11.360 Community Growth and Land Use Planning (MIT)
This course combines a seminar format with fieldwork to examine strategies of planning and control for growth and land use, chiefly at the municipal level. Specific topics include growth and its local consequences; land use planning approaches; and implementation tools including innovative zoning and regulatory techniques, physical design, and natural systems integration. Projects are arranged with small teams serving municipal clients.
Author(s): Ben-Joseph, Eran,Szold, Terry

License information
Related content

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Rock In The Classroom / Fractions and Decimals (Dance Single)

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde

Author(s): JAPPELL

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Designing a graphic
Designing a graphic - UNSPECIFIED Keywords:data visualisation , data design
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Acknowledgements

Professor David Lambert is Chief Executive of the Geographical but remains Research Associate of the Institute of Education (London). He is a former secondary geography teacher (for 12 years) and developed a scholarly interest in assessment issues following the introduction of the national curriculum. He also has a research interest in the way teachers select and use textbooks with pupils. He has a long-standing concern with moral and cultural aspects of geography education and is current
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT)
This course is an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®: Errors, condition numbers and roots of equations. Topics covered include Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finit
Author(s): Lermusiaux, Pierre

License information
Related content

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

2.1 Industry and markets: what do we mean?

Case study: Digital outsells film

Sales of digital cameras have overtaken traditional 35 mm cameras for the first time. According to monthly figures collated by national electric and photo retailer Dixons, digital camera sales out
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

The Gold Standard Never Dies

John Maynard Keynes thought he had pretty well killed gold as a monetary standard back in the 1930s. Governments of the world did their best to help him. It took longer than they thought. Gold in the money survived all the way to Nixon, and it was he who finally drove the stake in once and for all. That was supposed to be the end of it, and the beginning of the glorious ne
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Acknowledgements

Course image: Rafael Matsunaga Rafael Matsunaga in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Attribution-2.0 Licence.

All other materials included in this unit are derived from cont
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

1.4.4 Hibernation in mammals

Many animals become inactive for periods of varying duration during the winter and there is a diversity of terms used to describe this state, including: sleep, torpor, dormancy, lethargy and hibernation. The word hibernation is often used loosely to refer to general inactivity but, in biology, it refers to a specific phenomenon, sometimes called 'true hibernation'. Hibernation is defined as the condition of passing the winter in a resting state of deep sleep, during which metabolic rat
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

6.2 Introduction to the law in Scotland

This unit will introduce you to law making in Scotland. It is taken from W150 An introduction to law in contemporary Scotland, a new 15-point course from The Open University's Centre for Law. The unit begins by developing your general and legal study skills such as reading unfamiliar information, note taking and critical thinking. It then asks you to think about what law is and introduces you to the legal history of Scotland. The unit then moves to look at the Scottish Parliament by gi
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University

La diversité du vivant, moteur des écosystèmes cultivés (Vidéo)

Etienne Hainzelin présente les principaux types de services écosystémiques tels que mis en évidence par le Millenium Impact Assessment (2005). Il montre qu'au cours des dernières décennies, le développement d'une agriculture industrielle s'est fait notamment par le remplacement d'une partie de ces services écosystémiques par l'usage de fertilisants et de ...
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

A Better World: Innovative Solutions for Global Needs.mov
Boosters for pesticides and antibiotics, a high-efficiency nutcracker, and an electricity-free milk cooler -- all invented by University of Georgia faculty -- have been recognized by the Association of University Technology Managers in their most recent "Better World Report." For the 2011 report, AUTM was charged with selecting technologies that help the world in the face of adversity. Just 23 were selected for the report from among thousands of innovations from universities and other research
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

11.360 Community Growth and Land Use Planning (MIT)
This course combines a seminar format with fieldwork to examine strategies of planning and control for growth and land use, chiefly at the municipal level. Specific topics include growth and its local consequences; land use planning approaches; and implementation tools including innovative zoning and regulatory techniques, physical design, and natural systems integration. Projects are arranged with small teams serving municipal clients.
Author(s): Ben-Joseph, Eran,Szold, Terry

License information
Related content

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

L'Esthétique et l'art du point de vue d'une anthropologie complexe (3/3) (audio)


Cycle de conférences Edgar Morin : Globalité et complexité (3/3)


Organisé par le Collège d'études mondiales et la Fondation Calouste Gulbenkian.


Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Feudal System
This nine minute video is about the importance of land and its power. The Feudal System was the "power pyramid" of the Medieval age. The Kings were the ones with Power aka land.  People were afraid of the Viking and so they turned to the King for protection in these dangerous times. Students should know what a monarchy is to provide more background to this lecture.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

1.7 Summary of Section 1 and questions

  • Converging lenses or mirrors cause parallel beams of light to be brought to a focus at the focal point, situated at a distance of one focal length beyond the lens or one focal length in front of the mirror. Diverging lenses or mirrors cause parallel beams of light to diverge as if emanating from the focal point of the lens or mirror. Light paths are reversible, so a converging lens or mirror may also act as a collimator and
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Copyright © 2016 The Open University

1.2 Vitamin A

Activity 4

Look back at Table 1 and identify the foods that contain vitamin A. On the basis of this information, try to predict where vitamin A is stored in the human body.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417