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Internet Safety Rules
There are rules that you need to follow to be safe in the cyberworld.  These rules are stated in this video.
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1.4 Structures of power & inequalities

At the same time, such judgements and responses are not just personal matters: they are also embedded in all sorts of wider and interpersonal processes of power and inequality. These processes shape social policies, professional interventions, and representations in the media, as well as underpinning everyday social interactions in family lives and relationships. If we focus on family meanings, we may not always put issues of power, material inequalities, and moral evaluations at the centre o
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to look at how:

  • experiences of being an older person are shaped through a historical and mutually constitutive process involving an interplay between the personal, work and welfare; and the points of continuity and difference this interplay illuminates;

  • personal experiences of being older are constituted not only through age divisions, but also through loci of social difference and inequality organised around class, (dis)
    Author(s): The Open University

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Issues in Mental Health Research in Developing Countries
Introduces mental health as an integral part of global health research, including conducting needs assessments and intervention monitoring and evaluation. Presents and critiques strategies for integrating local cultural perspectives into research models. Examines methods of adapting psychiatric assessment tools for use cross-culturally and presents challenges for developing interventions for use in low-resource contexts. Encourages use of critical and creative thinking skills throughout to discu
Author(s): Judith Bass, MPH, MIA

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the Johns Hopkins University and individual authors unless otherwise noted. JHSPH OpenCourseWare materials are licensed under a Creative Commons License

Living with great white sharks in Cape Town

Authors: 
Coordinated by Alison Kock

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • discuss what ethics is and what constitutes an ethical issue

  • identify and discuss ethical issues that arise in the media, in routine conversations and, in particular, in personal everyday professional practice

  • discuss the role of emotions in ethical deliberations

  • discuss how negotiation might resolve apparent ethical differences

  • identify and discuss the ethical issues p
    Author(s): The Open University

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Personal development planning for engineering
This free course, Personal development planning for engineering, has been written in keeping with the requirements of UK-SPEC and the professional engineering institutions (e.g. ImechE, IET etc). It will provide you with a range of relevant information and guidance in critically assessing and scrutinising your career development aspirations. First p
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Digital Food Activism
Karin Eli and Tanja Schneider gives a talk for the UBVO seminar series on 29th November 2015.
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Total number of neurons—not enlarged prefrontal region—hallmark of human brain
Research by Associate Professor of Psychology Suzana Herculano-Houzel finds that human intelligence comes from the number of neurons in our brains—and it was the invention of cooking that made neuron development possible.
Author(s): David Salisbury

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1.1.7 Using the memory buttons

Calculations involving several operations can also be carried out in stages. One way to do this is to use the '=' key part way through the calculation. You can also use the calculator's memory.

The Windows calculator has a number of memory buttons, shown in Figure 2, to help yo
Author(s): The Open University

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4.5.2 n-fold toruses

We can use a similar technique to find the Euler characteristic of a 2-fold torus. If we cut the surface into two, as shown in Figure 95, and separate the pieces, we obtain two copies of a 1-fold torus with 1 hole, each with Euler characteristic −1.

Author(s): The Open University

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1.5.5 Point spread function and angular resolution

The image of a point-like source of light (such as a distant star) obtained using a telescope will never be a purely point-like image. Even in the absence of aberrations and atmospheric turbulence to distort the image, the image of a point-like object will be extended due to diffraction of light by the telescope aperture. The bigger the aperture, the smaller is the effect, but it is still present nonetheless. The intensity of the image of a point-like object will take the form shown in
Author(s): The Open University

2.4.1 Electromagnetism and fields

When Newton wrote about 'The System of the World' in Part 3 of Principia, the only forces he could discuss in any detail were the contact forces that arose when one object touched another, and gravity, which acted at a distance. Even so, Newton thought that there were other forces at work in the world, and hoped they might eventually be brought within his overall scheme just as gravity had been. In fact, Newton wrote:


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2 A day in the life of a hospital ward

In 1996, we visited Ward 29, one of two gastroenterology wards in the medical unit, and recorded the views of patients and staff. The ward has 24 beds. Its patients were women and men, across a wide age range, suffering from digestive disorders – for example, stomach ulcers, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, cancers of the digestive system or problems with liver function brought on by alcohol abuse. Because it was winter the ward had more elderly people than it would have at other times
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1.3 Artists' ‘Lives’

Helen Langdon's subtitle ‘A Life’ points to a very particular combination of literary and artistic sources in her biography. Catherine M. Soussloff suggests that the literary genre of artists' ‘Lives’ has led to the artist and his work being ‘inextricably entwined’ in a way that does not happen in the ‘Lives’ of poets or prose writers (Soussloff, 1990, p. 154). Although she overstates the case, as recent biographies of novelists, musicians, etc. demonstrate, artworks ca
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Actividad

Actividad 2.2a

In this activity you are going to listen to two people being interviewed about monuments and sights in their country. You will also learn how to say where things are.

1 Listen and choose the correct op
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Introduction to Money and Banking
OpenStax College

Some Rights Reserved

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1.2 Offshore fragments of industry

The rise of global factories in the 1970s owed much to the rapid improvement in transport and communications technologies which took place at that time and which made it possible to keep in touch with, and control, production processes in different parts of the world. Just as significant was the fragmentation of industrial production whereby parts of the manufacturing process could be relocated over vast distances. Sewing in garment and footwear production, for instance, was among the
Author(s): The Open University

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4.2 Introducing surveillance

The videos in this section will introduce you to surveillance as an idea and a practice. The main theme of these videos is how surveillance can be viewed as double-edged: it has both protective and disciplinary aspects to it. This double-edged nature of surveillance is explored through a case study of a shopping mall – the White Rose Centre on the outskirts of Leeds. You will come across a range of different evidence, including interviews with an academic, a policymaker and different users
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