1.5: The UK Government price indices
This unit looks at a wide variety of ways of comparing prices and the construction of a price index. You will also look at the Retail Price Index (RPI) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI), indices used by the UK Government to calculate the percentage by which prices in general have risen over any given period. You wil also look at the important statistical and mathematical ideas that contribute to the construction of a price index.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.4: Price ratios and price indices
This unit looks at a wide variety of ways of comparing prices and the construction of a price index. You will also look at the Retail Price Index (RPI) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI), indices used by the UK Government to calculate the percentage by which prices in general have risen over any given period. You wil also look at the important statistical and mathematical ideas that contribute to the construction of a price index.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3.2: The mean
This unit looks at a wide variety of ways of comparing prices and the construction of a price index. You will also look at the Retail Price Index (RPI) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI), indices used by the UK Government to calculate the percentage by which prices in general have risen over any given period. You wil also look at the important statistical and mathematical ideas that contribute to the construction of a price index.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3.1: The mean and the median
This unit looks at a wide variety of ways of comparing prices and the construction of a price index. You will also look at the Retail Price Index (RPI) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI), indices used by the UK Government to calculate the percentage by which prices in general have risen over any given period. You wil also look at the important statistical and mathematical ideas that contribute to the construction of a price index.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3: A statistical interlude—averages
This unit looks at a wide variety of ways of comparing prices and the construction of a price index. You will also look at the Retail Price Index (RPI) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI), indices used by the UK Government to calculate the percentage by which prices in general have risen over any given period. You wil also look at the important statistical and mathematical ideas that contribute to the construction of a price index.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2.1: Using your loaf
This unit looks at a wide variety of ways of comparing prices and the construction of a price index. You will also look at the Retail Price Index (RPI) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI), indices used by the UK Government to calculate the percentage by which prices in general have risen over any given period. You wil also look at the important statistical and mathematical ideas that contribute to the construction of a price index.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2: Are we getting better off?
This unit looks at a wide variety of ways of comparing prices and the construction of a price index. You will also look at the Retail Price Index (RPI) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI), indices used by the UK Government to calculate the percentage by which prices in general have risen over any given period. You wil also look at the important statistical and mathematical ideas that contribute to the construction of a price index.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.1: Introduction
This unit looks at a wide variety of ways of comparing prices and the construction of a price index. You will also look at the Retail Price Index (RPI) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI), indices used by the UK Government to calculate the percentage by which prices in general have risen over any given period. You wil also look at the important statistical and mathematical ideas that contribute to the construction of a price index.
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction
This unit looks at a wide variety of ways of comparing prices and the construction of a price index. You will also look at the Retail Price Index (RPI) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI), indices used by the UK Government to calculate the percentage by which prices in general have risen over any given period. You wil also look at the important statistical and mathematical ideas that contribute to the construction of a price index.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.1.1 The Rhind papyrus
The Egyptians are known for being ahead of their time in comparison to some civilisations that came after them. This unit looks at how the Egyptians solved mathematical problems in everyday life and the technology they used. An understanding of this area has only been possible following the translation of the Rosetta Stone.
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction
The Egyptians are known for being ahead of their time in comparison to some civilisations that came after them. This unit looks at how the Egyptians solved mathematical problems in everyday life and the technology they used. An understanding of this area has only been possible following the translation of the Rosetta Stone.
Author(s): The Open University

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Developing modelling skills
This unit is the third in the MSXR209 series of five units on mathematical modellng. It provides an overview of the processes involved in developing models, starting by explaining how to specify the purpose of the model. It then moves on to look at aspects involved in creating models, such as simplifying problems, choosing variables and parameters, formulating relationships and finding solutions. You will also look at interpreting results and evaluating models. This unit assumes that you have pr
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction
This unit is the third in the MSXR209 series of five units on mathematical modellng. It provides an overview of the processes involved in developing models, starting by explaining how to specify the purpose of the model. It then moves on to look at aspects involved in creating models, such as simplifying problems, choosing variables and parameters, formulating relationships and finding solutions. You will also look at interpreting results and evaluating models. This unit assumes that you have pr
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction
This unit is the fourth in the MSXR209 series of five units on mathematical modelling. In this unit you will be taken through the whole modelling process in detail, from creating a first simple model, through evaluating it, to the subsequent revision of the model by changing one of the assumptions. The problem that will be examined is one based on heat transfer. This unit assumes you have studied Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes (MSXR209_1), Analysing skid marks (MSXR209_2) and Developing
Author(s): The Open University

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Hybrid Systems II
Structure and Interpretation of Systems and Signals - Spring 2007. This course is an introduction to mathematical modeling techniques used in the design of electronic systems. An important keyword here is "mathematical." Subjects we will cover include continous and discrete signals, with applications to audio, images, video, communications, and control; State-based models, beginning with automata and evolving to LTI systems; Frequency domain models for signals and frequency response for systems,
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An overview of active galaxies
Active galaxies provide a prime example of high energy processes operating in the Universe. This unit gives an overview of active galaxies, including the supermassive black holes that power the engines at their centres, and the emission processes by which we detect and study them. It also gives practice in mathematical techniques for analysing data and theoretical models.
Author(s): The Open University

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