2.1 Reflecting on your mathematical history
Your course might not include any maths or technical content but, at some point during your course, it’s likely that you’ll come across information represented in charts, graphs and tables. You’ll be expected to know how to interpret this information. This unit will help you to develop the skills you need to do this. This unit can be used in conjunction with the ‘More working with charts, graphs and tables’ unit, which looks into more ways to present statistical information and shows y
Author(s): The Open University

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3 Reading articles for mathematical information
Your course might not include any maths or technical content but, at some point during your course, it’s likely that you’ll come across information represented in charts, graphs and tables. You’ll be expected to know how to interpret this information. This unit will help you to develop the skills you need to do this. This unit can be used in conjunction with the ‘More working with charts, graphs and tables’ unit, which looks into more ways to present statistical information and shows y
Author(s): The Open University

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2.6 Mathematical communication
There is increasing recognition that the reductionist mindset that is currently dominating society, rooted in unlimited economic growth unperceptive to its social and environmental impact, cannot resolve the converging environmental, social and economic crises we now face. The primary aim of this unit is to encourage the shift away from reductionist and human centred thinking towards a holistic and ecological worldview.
Author(s): The Open University

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Mathematical Modeling in Biology - Mary Lou Zeeman

Professor Mary Lou Zeeman “Mathematical Modeling in Biology: What Is It? And How Is It Useful?”

Inaugural Lecture -R. Wells Johnson Professorship of Mathematics - November 28, 2007


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Mathematical analysis of peer to peer communication networks
Distributed protocols for peer to peer file sharing, streaming video, and video on demand have revolutionised the way the majority of information is conveyed over the Internet. The peers are millions of computers, acting as both clients and servers, downloading and uploading information. Information to be shared is broken into chunks, and the chunks are traded among peers in the network. There can be turnover in the set of chunks of information being collected and/or in the set of peers collecti
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Professor James Mirrlees says we should keep faith with economic modelling - it works!
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Quilts as Mathematical Objects
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Teach your students about the mathematical concept of estimation

Estimate is a great interactive site that allows students to estimate a number that an arrow is pointing to on a number line. This is great for students who are first learning about estimation. It is an easy to use site that is fairly robust and would
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Perform four basic rules mathematical calculations
Understanding how to do calculations is important when measuring and marking out lengths of material for specific jobs. Trying to reduce waste and cost is always necessary. To do any simple calculations there are four main rules that you need to follow.
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The aim of this session is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs, why proofs are important, and how they can help us. In particular, the student will learn the following: proofs can help you to really see WHY a result is true; problems that are easy to state can be hard to solve (Fermat's Last Theorem); sometimes statements which appear to be intuitively obvious may turn out to be false (the Hospitals paradox); the answer to a question will often depend crucially on t
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This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in 2007-2008 and 2009-2010. This module introduces mathematical analysis building upon the experience of limits of sequences and properties of real numbers and on calculus. It includes limits and continuity of functions between Euclidean spaces, differentiation and integration. A variety of very important new concepts are introduced by investigating the properties of numerous examples, and developing the a
Author(s): Feinstein Joel F. Dr

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/