Family by the Pond
This short video is an animation designed for early learners about life in an Australian wetland. This sequence depicts a family of a Momma Duck and her ducklings. It shows her laying eggs, the eggs hatching, and babies swimming with mom. This is a great resource to help build background knowledge and to help make real world connections between nature and the classroom. (1:51)
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Diving beetle Backswimmer and Mosquito Larvae
This short video is an animation for early learners about life in an Australian wetland. This sequence depicts a diving beetle, backswimmer, mosquito larvae. This is a great resource to help build background knowledge and to help make real world connections between nature and the classroom. (1:52)
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Flashcard Animation of Garden Images
This short animated video shows a variety of garden images. Each picture is named and labeled. Some of the images include sun, ladybird, bee, flower, cloud, rain, and fly. This is a great resource to help build background knowledge and to help make real world connections between nature and the classroom. (2:11)
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Moth and Spider in the Garden at Night
This short video is an animation for young learners about life in an Australian backyard. This video depicts a moth and spider in a beautiful garden at night. This is a great resource to help build background knowledge and to help make real world connections between nature and the classroom. (2:41)
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Patients and Populations: Medical Decision-Making

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Patients Pop-Decision Making
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Sports Spread: Big weekend for British sport
July 1 - Sporting Index's Ed Fulton and Reuters Editor Owen Wyatt discuss the outlook ahead for David Haye vs Wladimir Klitschko and Andy Murray vs Rafael Nadal at the Wimbledon final.
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9 Conclusion

In this unit we have explored the mutual constitution of personal lives and social policy through an analysis of the implications of different aspects of citizenship on the lives of refugees and asylum seekers. We have seen that legislation, social policy and practice concerned with asylum have profound effects on personal lives. Crucially, we saw that the very words used to describe people, their access to welfare, rights to work, legal status and the procedures for becoming a British citize
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8.1.2Why do you think the Home Secretary did not draw on this research when interpreting the asylum

Considering these findings alongside the statistical data and our personal stories, we can draw some conclusions about the production and reproduction of knowledge about refugees and asylum seekers through research:

5.3. 1 What would you include in such a test?

An advisory group which drew up proposals for the new ‘Life in the United Kingdom’ naturalisation test, believed that the ‘two senses of “citizenship”, as legal naturalisation and as participation in public life, should support each other. In what has long been a multicultural society, new citizens should be equipped to be active citizens’ (Home Office Immigration and Nationality Directorate, 2003, Section 2).

Although they claimed that becoming British &
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5.3 Legal status and belonging

During the Second World War, Jewish refugees experienced great insecurity about their status, resulting in some cases in severe mental distress. Others ‘chafed at existing conditions. Indeed, most refugees felt they had become part of British Society’ (London, 2000, p. 262). Being naturalised as British citizens was for many ‘the milestone which established their settlement in Britain’ (London, 2000, p. 259).

Following the 2002 Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act,
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Acknowledgements

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

The following material is contained in: Work, Personal Lives and Social Policy (ed. Gerry Mooney) 2004, published in association wit
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4.5 Person specification
Does the recruitment and selection process fill you with dread? Discrimination and equal opportunities legislation can make this area feel like a minefield. If you are faced with appointing a new employee, then this unit will provide a straight-forward guide to the process: from writing job descriptions to finally assessing who to appoint.
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Acknowledgements

Text

The material is contained in Book 1 Chapter 2 of Sexualities: Personal Lives and Social Policy (ed Jean Carabine), part of a series published by The Policy Press in association with The Open University. The other books in the series are:

Care: Personal Lives and Social Policy (ed. Janet Fink)

Work: Personal Lives and Social Policy (ed. Gerry Mooney)

Citizenship: Personal Lives and Social Policy
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1.4 Sexuality, parenthood and social policy

Just as procreative sexuality within marriage has rarely been the focus of historical research, as a social phenomenon it has also been viewed as inherently unproblematic in terms of social policy. Unlike today, there was very little explicit legislation or public policy that directly addressed the ‘private’ sphere of marriage and family during the fertility decline. However, there were a number of broad social policy formations that made assumptions and reinforced dominant messages
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1.1 Declining fertility

In Britain, fertility decline occurred roughly between 1860 and 1930 – a span which includes the middle and end of the Victorian period (1860–1900), the Edwardian period (1900–1914), the First World War (1914–1918) and the 1920s. We will focus on the British experience, although a similar phenomenon has been noted in many other parts of the world. Fertility decline, also known as the demographic transition, is characterised by a shift from a ‘traditional’ norm of large famili
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Allometry: Size and its consequences or... Why aren't there 20 foot tall ants?
Evolution has resulted in changes in the sizes and forms of organisms. Everything about the biology of an animal, including its physiology, anatomy, and ecology, is influenced by its body size. Frequently there seem to be limits on the sizes that different organisms can attain, even when larger size might be thought to be evolutionarily advantageous. Often an increase or decrease in size is correlated with a change in proportions. Understanding the significance of a particular morphology or inte
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Life on the Moon
In this lesson, students learn about the physical properties of the Moon. They compare these to the properties of the Earth to determine how life would be different for astronauts living on the Moon. Using their understanding of these differences, they are asked to think about what types of products engineers would need to design for us to live comfortably on the Moon.
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Activity 3: Your own national culture
We know that culture guides the way people behave in society as a whole. But culture also plays a key role in organisations, which have their own unique set of values, beliefs and ways of doing business. This unit explores the concepts of national and organisational culture and the factors that influence both.
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Activity 2: Differences between national culture and organisational culture
We know that culture guides the way people behave in society as a whole. But culture also plays a key role in organisations, which have their own unique set of values, beliefs and ways of doing business. This unit explores the concepts of national and organisational culture and the factors that influence both.
Author(s): The Open University

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Activity 1: Defining culture
We know that culture guides the way people behave in society as a whole. But culture also plays a key role in organisations, which have their own unique set of values, beliefs and ways of doing business. This unit explores the concepts of national and organisational culture and the factors that influence both.
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