Terry Hodgkinson Inaugural Lecture
Terry has led the Regional Development Agency, Yorkshire Forward, as its Chair for seven years, overseeing the Agency in growing the economy of the Yorkshire and Humber region. He was honoured in the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2010 with the award of a CBE for services to business and regeneration and was recently appointed as a Deputy Lieutenant for West Yorkshire. He has recently launched his new business, entitled ‘Inspiration for Industry Education and Regeneration’. He holds a Visiting P
Author(s): Terry Hodgkinson,Leeds Metropolitan University

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How to Change a Flat Tire
This 5:35 minute long video gives the basics of changing a tire.
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5.2 The social construction of reality

What do we mean when we say reality is socially constructed? We inhabit a social world. Many of the ‘facts’ of our lives which we take for granted are ‘facts’ only in so far as we hold common mental models about them: for example, common understandings of money, contracts, marriage, the rules of the road, democracy, to name just a few. To understand the nature of social influences on decision making we need to start from this idea that the environment within which we exist a
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5.1 Introduction

As we noted earlier, both the rational-economic and psychological perspectives on decision making tend to ignore the social context in which we live and work. We turn now to consider this social context.


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4.6 Post-decision evaluation

For most normally functioning people, maintaining self-esteem is an important internal goal. This can cause us to filter out or discount information that might show us in an unfavourable light. This is what lies behind the fundamental attribution bias. This is the tendency to attribute good outcomes to our own actions and bad outcomes to factors outside our control. While such defences against loss of self-esteem can be helpful to the extent that they help us persist in the face of adv
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4.5.2 Anchoring adjustment

Many decisions need revisiting and updating as new information comes available. However, most of us make insufficient anchoring adjustment: this is the tendency to fail to update one's targets as the environment changes (Rutledge, 1993). Once a manager has made an initial decision or judgement then this provides a mental anchor which acts as a source of resistance to reaching a significantly different conclusion as new information becomes available. It is what happens when one has made
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4.5.1 Filtering

Which of these senses do you usually tune out? From birth we start learning to filter information out and to prioritise, label and classify the phenomena we observe. This is a vital process. Without it we literally could not function in our day-to-day lives. In our work lives, if we did not filter information and discard options we would suffer from analysis paralysis: the inability to make any decision in the face of the complexity and the ambiguity of the real world.

However, t
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Solar System!
ࡁn introduction to our solar system: the planets, our Sun and our Moon. Students begin by learning the history and engineering of space travel. They make simple rockets to acquire a basic understanding Newton's third law of motion. They explore energy transfer concepts and use renewable solar energy for cooking. They see how engineers design tools, equipment and spacecraft to go where it is too far and too dangerous for humans. They explore the Earth's water cycle, and gravity as applied to or
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Crocodile Skeleton - Hind Limb (Ball and Socket Join)
The crocodile's hind limbs are strong and sturdy and are used to pull itself across the ground when its out of the water. The ball and socket joint allows the limb to move in different directions.
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Hybrid Art > Synthesized Architecture
This paper investigates possible intersections between some contemporary artistic modalities and architectural practice. At first, it describes and discusses different uses of art in architectural history. Through the analyzes of Le Corbusier?s artistic and architectural practices, it observes the limits of looking at art as only ?inspiration? for architectural form and points to the necessity of surpassing this formal approach. More than bringing pictorial ?inspiration?, art, as a experimental
Author(s): Andr?s, Roberto

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Práctica 7 Los acentos del español: El acento castellano y los acentos no castellanos
In this unit materials you will learn about the history of Spain and the important place of Arab and Jewish cultures in Spanish history. You will study a number of language points to help you talk about history and will write descriptive texts using a variety of stylistic devices.
Author(s): The Open University

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Actividad 6
In this unit materials you will learn about the history of Spain and the important place of Arab and Jewish cultures in Spanish history. You will study a number of language points to help you talk about history and will write descriptive texts using a variety of stylistic devices.
Author(s): The Open University

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3 Partir ou pas?

Another aspect of holiday-making is the type of holiday that people choose. Here we look at how trends are changing among the French, and then hear people talk about their favourite destinations.

Activité 11 EXTRAIT 5

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2 Les Français en congé

In the second video sequence various people tell us when they take their holidays and explain why they do so. Before watching them, check whether you know how to talk about months and seasons in French.

Grammar Point 3 Talking about months and seasons

Months

When talking abou
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3.5 Benzodiazepine tranquillisers, Prozac and the SSRIs

One of the most significant ranges of drugs ever produced is the benzodiazepine tranquillisers (usually classed as ‘minor tranquillisers’ or ‘hypnotics’), often prescribed as a remedy for ‘minor’ disorders such as depression, sleeplessness and anxiety. In effect, they extended the range of conditions that could be treated by medication. The best-known example is probably Valium.

3.4 Pharmaceuticals for mental health: a brief history

The ‘revolution’ in drug therapy is widely credited with causing the mass closure of psychiatric hospitals in the 1950s and 1960s, meaning that patients who had previously been considered too much of a danger to themselves or others could be safely housed ‘in the community’ as long as they took the medication. However, the trend for a reduction in numbers was already evident at the time the drugs in question began to be available, and academics such as Joan Busfield and Andr
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3.3.1 A conflict of interest

One of the difficulties of the involvement of drug companies in the mental health field is that it produces a conflict of interest. To put it crudely, drug companies rely on a continuing supply of patients to keep them in business. This is not always congruent with people's best interests, as you will see below. Although mental health services are intended to help people experiencing mental distress, they also have other driving forces. The market economy model of provision has encouraged the
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3.3 Mental health as business: the profit motive

There is little question that the use of drugs to treat mental distress has become the dominant strategy. The historian Edward Shorter puts it graphically:

If there is one central intellectual reality at the end of the twentieth century, it is that the biological approach to psychiatry – treating mental illness as a genetically influenced disorder of brain chemistry – has been a smashing success.

(Shorter
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