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Peripheral Vision Lab
Students practice reading large letters on index cards with their peripheral vision. Then they repeat the experiment while looking through camera lenses, first a lens with a smaller focal length and then a lens with a larger focal length. They then complete a worksheet and explain how the experiment helps them solve the challenge question from lesson 1.
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program,

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

It's Tiggerific!
In Lesson 3, as part of the Research and Revise step students investigate potential energy held within springs (elastic potential energy). Class begins with a video of either spring shoes or bungee jumping. Students then move on into notes and problems as a group. A few questions are given as homework. The Test Your Mettle section concludes lesson includes a dry lab that involves pogo sticks solidifies the concepts of spring potential energy, kinetic energy, and gravitational energy, as well as
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program,

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Copyright 2010 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Bone Density Math and Logarithm Introduction
Students should have discovered in their reading from Activity 1 the term “logarithm.” It is at this point that students will begin their study of logarithms. Specifically, they will be examining the definition, history, and relationship to exponents. (Specifically, they will be rewriting exponents as logarithms and vice versa, evaluating expressions, solving for a missing piece.) Students will continue their examination of logarithms by studying the properties of logarithms (Multiplication/
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program,

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Maximum Power Point
Students learn how to find the maximum power point (MPP) of a photovoltaic (PV) panel in order to optimize its efficiency at creating solar power. They also learn about real-world applications and technologies that use this technique, as well as Ohm’s law and the power equation, which govern a PV panel’s ability to produce power.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Problem Solving
Students are introduced to a systematic procedure for solving problems through a demonstration and then the application of the method to an everyday activity. The unit project is introduced to provide relevance to subsequent lessons.
Author(s): Office of Educational Partnerships,

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Copyright 2011 - Office of Educational Partnerships, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Energy Perspectives
Students utilize data tables culled from the US DOE Energy Information Agency to create graphs to illustrate what types of energy we use and how we use it. An MS Excel workbook with several spreadsheets of data is provided. Students pick (or the teacher assigns) one of the data tables for the students to create a plot from and interpret the information provided. Each group of students then shares their interpretation and new perspectives on energy resources and use with the rest of the class.
Author(s): Office of Educational Partnerships,

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Copyright 2011 - Office of Educational Partnerships, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Egg Drop
A process for technical problem solving is introduced and applied to a fun demonstration. Given the success with the demo, the iterative nature of the process can be illustrated.
Author(s): Office of Educational Partnerships,

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Copyright 2011 - Office of Educational Partnerships, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Energy Resources and Systems
Several activities are included to teach and research the differences between renewable and non-renewable resources and various energy resources. The students work with a quantitative, but simple model of energy resources to show how rapidly a finite, non-renewable energy sources can be depleted, whereas renewable resources continue to be available. The students then complete a homework assignment or a longer, in-depth research project to learn about how various technologies that capture energy
Author(s): Office of Educational Partnerships,

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Copyright 2011 - Office of Educational Partnerships, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Biomedical Devices for the Eyes
Students examine the structure and function of the human eye, learning some amazing features about our eyes, which provide us with sight and an understanding of our surroundings. Students also learn about some common eye problems and the biomedical devices and medical procedures that resolve or help to lessen the effects of these vision deficiencies, including vision correction surgery.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Sound Booth Construction
Students explore the sound dampening ability of numerous materials by designing and prototyping model sound booths. As a result, students learn about how sound is reflected, absorbed and travels through various materials, thus giving them an overview of sound dampening, energy absorption and sound propagation in the context of engineering. Students also create blueprints and document their findings in a formal lab report.
Author(s): Electrical and Computer Engineering Department,

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Copyright 2011 - Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Drexel University GK-12 Program,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Muscles, Oh My!
Students are introduced to how engineering closely relates to the field of biomechanics and how the muscular system produces human movement. They learn the importance of the muscular system in our daily lives, why it is important to be able to repair muscular injuries and how engineering helps us by creating things to benefit our muscular health, movement and repair.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Cell Celebration!
Students look at the components of cells and their functions. The lesson focuses on the difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Each part of the cell performs a specific function that is vital for the cell’s survival. Bacteria are single-celled organisms that are very important to engineering. Engineers can use bacteria to break down toxic materials in a process called bioremediation, and they can also kill or disable harmful bacteria through disinfection.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

All Caught Up
Commercial fishing nets often trap unprofitable animals in the process of catching their target species. In the following activity, students will experience the difficulty that fishermen experience while trying to isolate a target species when a variety of animals are found in the area of interest. The class will then discuss the large magnitude of this problem. Students will practice their data acquisition and analysis skills, through the collection of data and processing of this information to
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Compare Fabric Materials
Students will look at different types of fabric and their respective individual properties. Using a magnifying glass and sandpaper they will test and observe the weave of fabrics and the wear quality of sample fabrics. By comparing the qualities of different fabrics they will better understand why there are so many different types of fabric and be able to recognize or suggest different uses for them.
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

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Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Do as the Romans: Construct an Aqueduct!
In this activity, students work with specified materials to create aqueduct components that will transport 2 liters of water across a short distance in their classroom. The goal is to build an aqueduct that will supply Aqueductis, a Roman city, with clean water for private homes, public baths, and glorious fountains.
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

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Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Sound for Sight
Echolocation is the ability to orient by transmitting sound and receiving echoes from objects in the environment. As a result of a Marco-Polo type activity and subsequent lesson, students learn basic concepts of echolocation. They use these concepts to understand how dolphins use echolocation to locate prey, escape predators, navigate their environment, such as avoiding gillnets set by commercial fishing vessels. Students will also learn that dolphin sounds are vibrations created by vocal organs
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Do Different Colors Absorb Heat Better?
Students test whether the color of a material affects how much heat it absorbs. Students will place an ice cube in a box made of colored paper (one box per color; white, yellow, red and black), which they will place in the sun. The students will make prediction as to which color will melt the ice cube first. They will record the order and time required for the ice cubes to melt.
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

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Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

A House is a House for Me
Students brainstorm and discuss the different types of materials used to build houses in various climates. They build small models of houses and test them in different climates.
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

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Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Mice Rule! (Or Not)
Students explore the relationships between genetics, biodiversity, and evolution through a simple activity involving hypothetical wild mouse populations. First, students toss coins to determine what traits a set of mouse parents possesses, such as fur color, body size, heat tolerance, and running speed. Next they use coin tossing to determine the traits a mouse pup born to these parents possesses. These physical features are then compared to features that would be most adaptive in several differ
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Analyze the Data
Students go through the logical process of quantitatively analyzing data from the FasTracks system. They gain experience identifying problems with the current design based upon their earlier observations and experiences in activities 1 and 2. Students discuss the flaws that they find in the system. This activity requires the use of the FasTracks Living Lab, a web portal to interactive train (transit) traffic data for a major metropolitan city.
Author(s): Teach Engineering Living Labs,

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Copyright 2011 - Teach Engineering Living Labs, Colorado School of Mines,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

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