Introduction

In this unit, we present the three main lines of experimental evidence pointing to the big bang origin of the Universe: (i) the recession of the galaxies; (ii) the microwave remnant of the early fireball; and (iii) the comparison between the calculated primordial nuclear abundances and the present-day composition of matter in the Universe.

A data sheet of useful information is provided as a pdf for your use. You may wish to print out a copy to keep handy as you progress through the unit
Author(s): The Open University

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Acknowledgements

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons licence). See Terms and Conditions.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following for permission to reproduce:

Figure 1a: Neil Borden/Science Photo Library; Figure: 1b NOAA/Science Photo Library; Figure 1c: Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy/Science Photo Library; Figure 11: Science Photo Library; Figure 14: Science Museum.


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11 Primary science

Primary science has grown in importance in many countries in recent years and all programmes have faced similar problems of improving the science knowledge of primary teachers, lack of equipment, and, just as significantly, lack of agreement about what sort of science should be taught to young pupils. To illustrate some of the similar issues that have confronted policy makers in many areas of the world, let's look at the establishment of primary science in the UK.

Before 1988, England,
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10 ‘Science for all?’ A look at some contexts

The following statement is from the science National Curriculum in England published in 2000.

The importance of science

Science stimulates and excites pupils’ curiosity about phenomena and events in the world around them. It also satisfies this curiosity with knowledge. Because science links direct practical experience with ideas, it can engage learners at many levels. Scientific meth
Author(s): The Open University

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AP Biology: Survey of Animals Part II, Chordates

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde