Mass Destruction: Truth and Consequences with Hans Blix and Christiane Amanpour
This on-stage conversation with former U.N. weapons inspector Hans Blix, in conversation with CNN correspondent Christiane Amanpour. This event took place on Wednesday, March 17, 2004 in Zellerbach Auditorium, UC Berkeley. For more information, visit the Graduate School of Journalism's event website. Sponsored by: The UCB Graduate School of Journalism, The Goldman Forum on the Press & Foreign Affairs, the Human Rights Center, The Office of the Chancellor and the Open Society Institute. Co-Sp
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George Soros: The Bubble of American Supremacy
This event took place on Wednesday, March 3, 2004 in Zellerbach Auditorium, UC Berkeley. George Soros is a financier, philanthropist, author, and founder and chairman of the Open Society Institute. He will be joined on stage for a conversation with Orville Schell, Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism, to discuss the bubble phenomenon as it relates to the United States' notion of self-supremacy in the world. For more information, visit the Graduate School of Journalism's event website. Sp
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Distinguished Innovator Lecture Series: Chris Rittler
Chris Rittler, Vice President of Business Development and Product Management, Tropos Networks Chris Rittler is Tropos Networks' Vice President of Business Development and Product Management. He has over 15 years of experience in the wireless systems industry bringing exemplary leadership in the creation of strategy and the development of products for the wireless carrier market. He leads the company's business development and product managment teams. Mr. Rittler was most recently the Senior
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Lesson 4: Protein Energy Malnutrition
In this unit you will learn about Protein-Energy-Malnutrition (PEM), the most serious nutritional problem among children. The knowledge acquired will enable you to identify children with PEM in your community at the earliest possible stage and be able to manage the situation.
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Winter Math Activities
There are many possibilities for winter math data collection activities. Look for opportunities to have students create tally charts, clothespin graphs, Venn diagrams, bar and line graphs to organize data and analyze the results of the data collection. Build on students' natural fascination with penguins by including these math pattern activities. The Koch Snowflake is an example of an iterative drawing as each successive stage begins with the previous stage. The Koch snowflake begins with an eq
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Lunch with Kate: Katharine Hepburn-inspired Fashion Show
At a sold-out luncheon called Lunch With Kate, a Katharine Hepburn-inspired fashion show was held as both a fundraiser for the Kent State University Museum and to herald the museum's original exhibition, Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen.
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Looking at Learning ... Again, Part 2: Workshop 2. Mathematics: A Community Focus
With Dr. Marta Civil. As teachers, we often make assumptions about the knowledge children are exposed to at home. Sometimes it seems that we focus on only reading and writing,Dr. Civil contends that we need to look more carefully at the mathematical potential of the home and that it is essential that schools learn to be more flexible and knowledgeable about students’ home environments. See and hear from Dr. Civil, the teachers she works with, and a long-standing parent mathematics group, and fo
Author(s): Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

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Smithsonian Institution Astrophysical Observatory "All Rights Reserved"

Civil War Archeology: Investigating the Battles of Wilson's Creek and Pea Ridge
This site examines archeological techniques used to explore these two battle sites. These battles, fought in Missouri and Arkansas in 1861 and 1862, helped keep Missouri in the Union and set the stage for the Union to gain control of most lands west of the Mississippi by 1863.
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Approaching plays
Do you want to get more out of drama? This unit is designed to develop the analytical skills you need for a more in-depth study of literary plays. You will learn about dialogue, stage directions, blank verse, dramatic structure and conventions and aspects of performance.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Color Lithograph of the Old State House at Corydon and the First State House at Indianapolis, 1876
An idealized color lithograph illustration of the Old Statehouse at Corydon and the first statehouse at Indianapolis. The lithograph is dated 1876 and was probably created for the centennial celebration of the United States.
Author(s): Juengling, Frederick

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Digital Image © 2008 Indiana Historical Society. All Rights Reserved.

"A Definite and Imperative Need for Legislation Against Discrimination"
The first laws passed in the South to impose statewide segregation in public facilities, instituted in the 1880s and 1890s, applied to railroad car seating. During this period, railway lines spread rapidly from cities to rural communities. In 1896, the U.S. Supreme Court validated these early "Jim Crow" laws when it ruled in Plessy v. Ferguson that a Louisiana statute requiring "separate but equal" accommodations for white and black railroad passengers did not conflict with the Fourteenth Amendm
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Another Approach To Theatre
Al Jarreau performs 'You Don't See Me'Program focuses on three different African American theater productions. Host Barbara Barrow introduces the topic of Black theater and stage works Raisin (the Tony-Award-winning musical for 1974), The Black Dyad (about Black male and female relationships) and 'Theatre in Reverse,' a Say Brother theater piece with an in-studio vocal performance by Al Jarreau with dance performances (with the intent of drawing the audience's attention to sound and light, rathe
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Racial Differences in Cardiac Catheterization as a Function of Patients’ Beliefs
Objectives. We examined racial differences in cardiac catheterization rates and reviewed whether patients’ beliefs or other variables were associated with observed disparities. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study of 1045 White and African American patients at 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers whose nuclear imaging studies indicated reversible cardiac ischemia. Results. There were few demographic differences between White and African American patients in our sample.
Author(s): Kressin, Nancy R.,Chang, Bei-Hung,Whittle, Jeff,Pe

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Rights not set

Dialogue avec David Lynch

David Lynch - dialogue


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LSE Literary Weekend - Hackney, That Rose-Red Empire
Editors note: Unfortunately the last few minutes of this event are missing from the podcast. Iain Sinclair is a writer, poet and film-maker and widely regarded as one of London's greatest chroniclers. Jerry White has been writing about London for thirty years. His London in the Twentieth Century: A City and Its People won the Wolfson History Prize 2001. Patrick Wright is a writer with an interest in the cultural and political dimensions of modern history. He is the author of a number of highly a
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A.B.L.E. Tech: Achieving Better Life Experiences for People with Injury, Disability and Aging Challe
Imagine a time when technology trumps injury and disease, and the very notion of disability begins to fade. These panelists suggest that we are at the dawn of such an era.

John Hockenberry, who zips around the stage in his flashing light –equipped wheelchair, tells us that “vast, extraordinary and sometimes

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China's Development and China-U.S. Relations
MIT President Susan Hockfield hails a new era of collaboration between the Institute and China, and Zhou Wenzhong, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the People's Republic of China, discusses the larger relationship between his country and the U.S., particularly in light of the economic crisis
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Lunch with a Laureate: Robert Horvitz
As an undergraduate at MIT, Robert Horvitz did not take a biology course until his senior year. But after only six weeks into his first class with professor Cy Leventhal, he realized this was the field for him. He boldly asked for a recommendation as part of his application to grad school—in biology. “Is it too late?” he
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Neural Basis of Drug Addiction
How does someone move from recreational drug use to addiction? Barry Everitt’s group at the University of Cambridge has been trying to break down the stages and neural circuitry of addiction with great precision.

Everitt’s research attempts to operationalize a progression in animals from the voluntary taking o

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Personalized Energy
Daniel Nocera is swimming very hard against the current of mainstream energy research. While many scientists are figuring out how to scale up wind, geothermal or biomass systems, Nocera is focusing on “personalized” energy units that can be manufactured, distributed and installed on the cheap. His main concern
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