Lecture 01: Introduction
This course covers the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. The focus of the c
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Lecture 35: Metals in Biology
5.112 is an introductory chemistry course for students with an unusually strong background in chemistry. Knowledge of calculus equivalent to 18.01 is recommended. Emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. The course also covers applications of basic principles to problems in metal coordination chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry.
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Lecture 27: Molecular Orbital Theory for Diatomic Molecules
5.112 is an introductory chemistry course for students with an unusually strong background in chemistry. Knowledge of calculus equivalent to 18.01 is recommended. Emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. The course also covers applications of basic principles to problems in metal coordination chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry.
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Lecture 23: Cell Potentials and Free Energy
5.112 is an introductory chemistry course for students with an unusually strong background in chemistry. Knowledge of calculus equivalent to 18.01 is recommended. Emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. The course also covers applications of basic principles to problems in metal coordination chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry.
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Lecture 22: Electrons in Chemistry: Redox Processes
5.112 is an introductory chemistry course for students with an unusually strong background in chemistry. Knowledge of calculus equivalent to 18.01 is recommended. Emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. The course also covers applications of basic principles to problems in metal coordination chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry.
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Lecture 20: Lewis and Brønsted Acid-Base ConceptsTT
5.112 is an introductory chemistry course for students with an unusually strong background in chemistry. Knowledge of calculus equivalent to 18.01 is recommended. Emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. The course also covers applications of basic principles to problems in metal coordination chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry.
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Lecture 13: Kinetic Theory - Behavior of Gases
5.112 is an introductory chemistry course for students with an unusually strong background in chemistry. Knowledge of calculus equivalent to 18.01 is recommended. Emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. The course also covers applications of basic principles to problems in metal coordination chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry.
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Lecture 11: Why Wavefunctions are Important?
5.112 is an introductory chemistry course for students with an unusually strong background in chemistry. Knowledge of calculus equivalent to 18.01 is recommended. Emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. The course also covers applications of basic principles to problems in metal coordination chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry.
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Lecture 13: Molecular Biology IV (cont.); Gene Regulation I
Course - Group - Lecture 13: Molecular Biology IV (cont.); Gene Regulation I - MIT > Introductory Biology > Lecture 13: Molecular Biology IV (cont.); Gene Regulation I
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Lecture 32: Molecular Evolution
Course - Group - Lecture 32: Molecular Evolution - MIT > Introductory Biology > Lecture 32: Molecular Evolution
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Lecture 12: Molecular Biology IV
Course - Group - Lecture 12: Molecular Biology IV - MIT > Introductory Biology > Lecture 12: Molecular Biology IV
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Lecture 11: Molecular Biology III
Course - Group - Lecture 11: Molecular Biology III - MIT > Introductory Biology > Lecture 11: Molecular Biology III
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Lecture 09: Molecular Biology I
Course - Group - Lecture 09: Molecular Biology I - MIT > Introductory Biology > Lecture 09: Molecular Biology I
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Experts 2010 J - Clôture du colloque

Clôture du colloque sur la propriété industrielle et intellectuelle.

SCD Médecine.


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The end of the road?
 Professor Andy Collop

Road traffic has grown more than 80% since 1980 – as a result roads have deteriorated more quickly than could have been envisaged. Britain’s road network is one of the countries largest national assets.

Professor Andy Collop from the School of Civil Engineering describes the research taking place in Nottingham Transportation Engineering Centre and the improveme
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Image Games
Christiane Paul delivers the closing keynote at the Art History of Games Symposium on February 6, 2010 in the High Museum of Art's Rich Auditorium on the campus of the Woodruff Arts Center, in midtown Atlanta. The symposium was presented by Georgia Tech and the Savannah College of Art and Design. Starting from a brief outline of the art-historical connections between games and art, the presentation will explore how game art projects have expanded or redefined traditional characteristics of "ima
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Fundamentals of Cancer Research: Introduction and Overview
This inaugural address lays the groundwork for an 11-part series on MIT’s efforts in cancer research. Susan Hockfield views MIT’s Center for Cancer Research as a central example of how “life sciences are coming into conversation with engineering in a powerful way.” Robert Silbey provides histo
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Introduction

‘Tough on the causes of crime.’ A famous phrase, but what is crime? This unit examines how we as a ‘society’ define crime. You will look at the fear that is generated within communities and what evidence is available to support claims that are made about crime rates.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Introducing the social sciences (DD100) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish t
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Copyright © 2013 The Open University

References
William Wilberforce, the politician and religious writer, was instrumental in the abolition of slavery in Britain in 1807. This unit explores Wilberforce’s career and writings and assesses their historical significance. In particular it examines the contribution that Evangelicalism, the religious tradition to which Wilberforce belonged, made in the transitions between the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Throughout it relates Wilberforce’s career and writings to wider social and cultural devel
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Learning outcomes
William Wilberforce, the politician and religious writer, was instrumental in the abolition of slavery in Britain in 1807. This unit explores Wilberforce’s career and writings and assesses their historical significance. In particular it examines the contribution that Evangelicalism, the religious tradition to which Wilberforce belonged, made in the transitions between the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Throughout it relates Wilberforce’s career and writings to wider social and cultural devel
Author(s): The Open University

License information
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2