The Explorers - Lionfish hunting and night diving at Carrie Bow Cay, Belize
Georgia Tech researchers traveled to the Carrie Bow Cay field station in Belize for the coral spawning season. The team's goal was to collect coral larvae for their research. While there, they helped rid the reef of invasive lionfish. Read more at: www.rh.gatech.edu Special thanks to Moby for the music.
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Afghans celebrate Nowruz new year
Afghanistan celebrates the arrival of the new year according to the Persian calendar, some pray for "year without war." Gavino Garay reports. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe More updates and breaking news: http://smarturl.it/BreakingNews Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including business, financial, national, and international news. For over 160
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Residents protest Houthi takeover of Yemen's central city Taiz
Residents of Taiz protest a Houthi takeover of their city, in an escalation of Yemen's power struggle that risks drawing in Saudi Arabia and main rival Iran. Mana Rabiee reports. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe More updates and breaking news: http://smarturl.it/BreakingNews Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including business, financial, national,
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2 Odd one out

The image below shows models of four mammals:

  • Rhinoceros

  • Whale

  • Elephant

  • Hippopotamus

Figure 1

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5.1 Introduction

There are several types of diabetes, including two that are common: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 2 is the most common sort of diabetes. Worldwide, about 90 per cent of people with diabetes have Type 2 and about 10 per cent have Type 1. The other sorts of diabetes account for very small numbers of people.


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4 How to diagnose diabetes

Diabetes is a condition that results in an increased concentration of blood glucose and for diagnosis, accurate measurements of blood glucose levels are required. Blood glucose levels can be measured on different samples of blood. Sometimes the whole of the blood sample is used. This occurs when finger prick samples are measured on small personal meters. For more accurate measurements, the sample of blood is taken to a laboratory and the blood cells are removed. Measurements are then made on
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1 Defining diabetes

This unit introduces the parts of the body and processes involved in the development of diabetes. Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are similar but distinct conditions and, for doctors, it is not always easy to decide which type of diabetes someone has. Does this matter, and is one type of diabetes worse than the other? There are many misconceptions about diabetes among health care professionals and the population in general. We hope this unit will help you to explore and clarify your ideas about di
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2.6 Three schools of classification

Activity 5

0 hours 10 minutes

This clip explores the three kinds of relationships that have been explained so far, in terms of the work of Simpson, Mayr and Hennig, which are referred to as Simpsonian
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2.5 What does relationship mean in systematics? W. Hennig

Activity 4

0 hours 5 minutes

In this clip, Dr. Patterson introduces his third systematist, a German entomologist named Willi Hennig. This offers a third meaning of ‘relationship’, which is illustr
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2.4 What does relationship mean in systematics? E. Mayr

Activity 3

0 hours 5 minutes

Dr. Patterson looks at the second of his three systematists, Ernst Mayr. Mayr’s answer to the meaning of ‘relationship’ in systematics comes from the point of view o
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8.4 When surgery is required

For some cardiovascular disease patients, surgery may be carried out as an emergency procedure or become an inevitable progression, following on from drug therapy. There are various degrees of surgery carried out, ranging from the fairly routine and minorly invasive procedure of coronary angioplasty to the major life-saving heart (or heart and lung) transplant. While it is important to understand all of the detail of surgical procedures and how the cardiac surgical team work together, it is a
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1.8.3 Explaining the observations

Having made and reviewed our observations, we are now in a position to interpret them – why are the rocks the way they are? The sedimentary strata that we see in Figure 16 were likely to have been deposited in essentially horizontal layers, so why is one set tilted and the other horizontal? To answer
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce mate
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5.2 Ways of organising yourself

How do you organise yourself?

Activity 12

Make a note of how you organise your:

  • emails

  • internet bookmarks or favorites

  • computer files

  • you
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5.4.2 Leadership expectations

  • Largely because of expectations created in childhood (our ‘inner child of the past’), we have many unconscious expectations of leaders, and may well harbour resentments, anxieties, suspicions, subservience, passive resistances and attitudes to leadership that have little relationship to current adult realities.

  • The leader needs to be able to manage these feelings and his or her own responses to them.

  • Leaders will tend t
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2.4 Review

In working through this section, you have identified some of your initial expectations and I have explained some of what I think you will discover as you work through the unit. It would be appropriate at this point to look at some of the questions I asked you about your expectations again and note ways your expectations have changed.

Spend a total of around 30 minutes on the next three activities.

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2.8 Good times and bad

The music industry, like any other large industrial business, had good times and bad times. By 1924 the burgeoning of radio broadcasting in the United States caused a severe downturn in record and equipment sales, leading to amalgamations and bankruptcies of many of the record companies. Actually, radio broadcast studio technology proved of great importance to the record industry. The sensitive microphones and electronic amplifiers used in broadcast studios offered improved characteristics th
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2.5 Why intentions?

Most of the rest of Grice's paper is dedicated to spelling out a way of identifying the meaning of an individual utterance ‘on an occasion’ with the content of the utterer's intentions (Step One). The hard task he faces is to say what type of intention creates meaning. If someone shouts ‘I saw a film last night’ extremely loudly at their brother with the intention of making this brother fall off his bike, this ‘utterance’ (if that is the right word) does not thereby mean fall o
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3.1 Clubs and societies

The milieu was urban. It was not a business of isolated individuals working in country estates, or of secluded academics, cloistered within unworldly universities. The scene was convivial, social. The focus was Edinburgh, although Glasgow and Aberdeen were active too. Cities were small. Even the capital was intimate enough for its intelligentsia to be able to meet regularly and casually. ‘Here I stand, at what is called the Cross of Edinburgh’, wrote an excited visitor, ‘and within a fe
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1 The meanings and values of textiles in Ghana

This unit looks at three kinds of textile used and marketed in Kumasi and its surrounding towns in Ghana – the hand-made textiles of kente and adinkra and industrially produced waxed cottons – in order to consider meanings and values assigned to them.

The unit revolves around a series of video clips originally produced for the course A216 Art and its histories. The Course Team filmed at the market in Kumasi as well as at Bonwire, which is a centre for kente
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