4.1.1 When are line graphs used?

A line graph shows a relationship between two variables. In other words, it shows how one thing varies by comparison to another. For example, a distance-time graph shows distance varying against the time of day, or the start time of a journey. The distance increases when a vehicle is moving but remains the same when the vehicle is stationary.


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3.1.1 When are tables used?

Within your course, tables are likely to be used as a particular structured format to summarise numerical information. They tend to be used to present data as a summary and as a starting point for discussion. But someone always prepares tables. So always be aware of where the table that you are looking at has come from. Could the source be trying to tell you something in particular? For example, if a table were summarising the costs of running a hospital, would you expect figures from the gov
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1 Getting the most from charts, graphs and tables

Do you sometimes feel confused about how to create a chart, graph or table?

Are you not always sure which of these to choose to illustrate your set of data?

Why do we produce charts, graphs and tables anyway?

Spend a few minutes writing down what you think are the reasons why we choose to present data in this way before you read on.

One student has said:

If an exam or assessment question ask
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4.8 Mean, median and mode

Most of us are familiar with the word ‘average’. We regularly encounter statements like ‘the average temperature in May was 4 °C below normal’ or ‘underground water reserves are currently above average’. The term average is used to convey the idea of an amount, which is standard; typical of the values involved. When we are faced with a set of values, the average should help us to get a quick understanding of the general size of the values in the set. The mean, median and mode are
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2.3.4 Symbolic data

The fourth kind of data is essentially symbolic – symbolic creations of minds, such as the texts people have written, their art, what they have said (recorded and transcribed), the exact ways they use language and the meanings they have communicated. These symbolic data are the products of minds, but once created they can exist and be studied and analysed quite separately from the particular minds that created them. These kinds of data are used to provide evidence of meanings, and th
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1 The importance of school governors

I wouldn't have accepted the job if I didn't think that the governors understood their role.

(A secondary headteacher)

In March 2004, the DfES stated that school governors represented one per cent of the adult population, and constitute the single biggest volunteer force nationally. However, doing the job voluntarily does not mean that governors should aim to do it less than professionally!


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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.


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1 Performance management

Figure 1

2 Finding evidence

If the purpose of monitoring is to ensure that policies and plans are being put into action, it follows that governors should be focusing their attention on finding evidence that supports this.

Governors are not inspectors, and need to be aware of the danger that they could impinge on the role of the headteacher through inappropriate involvement in day-to-day monitoring, rather than operating at the strategic level.

How monitoring is undertaken is a matter for each individual gove
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6.2 Citizenship at work

Employment is an issue of growing relevance to the lives of young people. In addition to their contact with the world of work through work experience, work-related learning and Citizenship, many young people also combine part-time work with their studies…. Young people need to know about the importance of health and safety at work, how to tackle discrimination and how to exercise their rights. They also need to underst
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References

Advisory Centre for Education (ACE) (2004) ‘Laws to protect children with SEN “in conflict”’, Bulletin no. 121, October, p. 4.
Armstrong, D. (2003) Experiences of Special Education: re-evaluating policy and practice through life stories, London, RoutledgeFalmer.
Aspis, S. (2004) ‘Why exams and tests do not help disabled and non-disabled children learn in the
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2.2 Evaluating discussion (continued)

Activity 4: Evaluating discussions (2)

5 hours 0 minutes

The quality of discussion amongst students can be evaluated by carrying out the following activity.

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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will have:

  • gained an understanding of ways that spoken language is used to create joint knowledge and understanding, and to pursue teaching and learning;

  • considered the educational implications of some recent research on teaching and learning in face-to-face interactions;

  • tried out some approaches to analysing the spoken language of teaching and learning.


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Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources:

Figures

Fig
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Arte y cultura popular

Actividad 15

Ya ha analizado algunas de las diferencias que existen entre el arte y la artesanía. A continuación va a leer un texto académico en el que se explora el concepto de artesanía pero esta vez en relación a los términos dear
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Las diferencias entre arte y artesanía.

Esta sesión trata de las semejanzas y diferencias que existen entre el arte y la artesanía.

Actividad 12

En esta actividad va a oír a varias personas que dan su opinión sobre las diferencias entre arte y artesanía.

1<
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El arte conceptual

Actividad 11

En esta actividad va a estudiar más a fondo el arte conceptual.

  1. Si usted sabe mucho sobre arte, haga el siguiente test, y luego compruebe sus respuestas leyendo el texto . Si prefier
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8.6.1 Vocabulary strategies: classifying vocabulary according to grammatical class

Classify the following vocabulary by placing the words in the appropriate columns. If you are unsure of what the grammatical terms mean, go to the section ‘Parts of Speech’ in the dictionary.

Ponga las palabras en el recuadro correspondiente.

gimnasio • sacar • estar • dinero • func
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8.5 Actividad

Actividad 8.4

Vocabulario

en el campo in
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1.1.4 Le rôle du touriste

Activité 4

Vocabulaire
Vous êtes de la région? Are
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