Focus on Research - Linda Spurlock
Linda Spurlock, an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at Kent State, discusses her field of study, which includes forensic art, reconstructing fossils and more.
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Animal marks and trails
Items in nature, such as twigs and leaves, can show bite and chew marks where animals have been eating off of plants. Animals make trails by traveling over the same area several times to get to a destination.
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Algal cell
This red algal cell (Chlamydomonas nivalis) gives mountain snow packs a red tint. It uses the pollutants in snow as food. It cannot be seen without a microscope.
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Acid in water
Plants and animals that live in water create some amount of acid in the water. The carbon dioxide that plants and animals release into the water makes the water acidic and unsafe for living organisms. This is why the water of captive aquatic animals and plants must be changed often.
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Abundant green plants on the forest floor
Green plants make their own food by a process called photosynthesis. They also use nutrients and water from the soil to grow. Primary consumers (insects, chipmunks, mice and deer) eat green plants.
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A rhinoceros
A rhinoceros is an example of an herbivore. Herbivores are animals that mostly eat producers, or plants.
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A field of soil
Soil is an example of a non-living thing. Soil contains nutrients and living organisms, but the soil itself is not alive. Soil is important in plant growth because soil gives plants a place to anchor their roots and it also provides the plant with essential nutrients.
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A fern plant in forest habitat
Ferns and horsetails are well-known seedless vascular plants. Different from mosses, ferns have branched spore producing structures which allows for the plant to produce many spores. The spots on the leaves of the fern contain the spores.
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A dam in the middle of a river
Dams have negative impacts on the plants and animals that have adapted to the specific movement of natural rivers and streams. Dams also cause temperature changes, erosion, and movement of sediment that are deadly to many organisms.
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A collection of fern plants in a California forest
Ferns are the most diverse group of seedless vascular plants. The leaves are compound and contain many little leaflets. The many leaflets contain spore spots. Ferns have a true root system, unlike the bryophytes.
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A Manual of Online Molecular Biology Techniques
This is a collection of tried-and-true technique descriptions used in teaching postgraduate students in the Department of Molecular & Cell Biology at UCT.
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What is the genome made of?
Genomes are composed of DNA, and a knowledge of the structure of DNA is essential to understand how it can function as hereditary material. DNA is remarkable, breathtakingly simple in its structure yet capable of directing all the living processes in a cell, the production of new cells and the development of a fertilized egg to an individual adult. DNA has three key properties: it is relatively stable; its structure suggests an obvious way in which the molecule can be duplicated, or replicated;
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

The Thin Blue Line-Forensic Scientists
This site draws on, and brings together, many scientific disciplines-identification of hairs and fibers, forensic psychology,DNA testing, photography, bloodstain pattern analysis, and computer forensics-that contribute to the integrated analysis of a crime and the physical evidence left at a crime scene.
Author(s): Ian Hunter

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Bio-engineered Animals and Models of Human Disease
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A celebration and critical evaluation of the work of Mark Philp: Roundtable
Speakers from this day event join in discussion with Mark Philp himself about some of the issues raised throughout the day. This discussion is taken from 'A celebration and critical evaluation of the work of Mark Philp'. Mark Philp was our founding Head of Department (2000-2005) and Tutorial Fellow at Oriel College (1983-2013). He is now, since 2013, Professor of History at the University of Warwick. His work in the fields of political thought and political theory are notable for their interdis
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Aram Khachaturian Biography 2/10
Aram Khachaturian was a Soviet Armenian composer who lived from 1903-1978.  His music was influenced by Armenian Folk Music.  He composed various piano works, as well as concertos for violin, cello and piano.  He is probably best know for the piece Sabre Dance and the film music for Spartacus.
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Waterwheel Work
Students learn the history of the waterwheel and common uses for water turbines today. They explore kinetic energy by creating their own experimental waterwheel from a two-liter plastic bottle. They investigate the transformations of energy involved in turning the blades of a hydro-turbine into work, and experiment with how weight affects the rotational rate of the waterwheel. Students also discuss and explore the characteristics of hydroelectric plants.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2009 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Falling Water
Students drop water from different heights to demonstrate the conversion of water's potential energy to kinetic energy. They see how varying the height from which water is dropped affects the splash size. They follow good experiment protocol, take measurements, calculate averages and graph results. In seeing how falling water can be used to do work, they also learn how this energy transformation figures into the engineering design and construction of hydroelectric power plants, dams and reservoi
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Showcase: Oxford Stem cell Institute
Showcase: Oxford Stem cell Institute
Author(s): Paul Fairchild

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Tougher Crops for a Warmer World
Trying to grow plants in Australian conditions is challenging - it always seems to be too hot, too cold, too wet, too dry, too salty, too infertile. And it is likely to get harder as the effects of climate change become increasingly apparent. The economic and social effects of our harsh environment are significant, reducing yield for farmers and making the sustainable use of land difficult.
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