8.514 Strongly Correlated Systems in Condensed Matter Physics (MIT)
In this course we shall develop theoretical methods suitable for the description of the many-body phenomena, such as Hamiltonian second-quantized operator formalism, Greens functions, path integral, functional integral, and the quantum kinetic equation. The concepts to be introduced include, but are not limited to, the random phase approximation, the mean field theory (aka saddle-point, or semiclassical approximation), the tunneling dynamics in imaginary time, instantons, Berry phase, coherent s
Author(s): Levitov, Leonid

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8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT)
8.01 is a first-semester freshman physics class in Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory. In addition to the basic concepts of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory, a variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Binary Stars, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Resonance Phenomena, Musical Instruments, Stellar Collapse, Supernovae, Astronomical observations from very high flying balloons (lecture 35), and you will be allowed a peek into the int
Author(s): Lewin, Walter

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22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT)
In this course, students will learn about plasmas, the fourth state of matter. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is of increasing economic importance. Plasmas behave in lots of interesting and sometimes unexpected ways. The course is intended only as a first plasma physics course, but includes critical concepts needed for a foundation for further study. A solid undergraduate background in classical physics, electromagnetic theory including Maxwell's equations, and mathema
Author(s): Hutchinson, Ian,Freidberg, Jeffrey

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8.01 Physics I (MIT)
Physics I is a first-year physics course which introduces students to classical mechanics. Topics include: space and time; straight-line kinematics; motion in a plane; forces and equilibrium; experimental basis of Newton's laws; particle dynamics; universal gravitation; collisions and conservation laws; work and potential energy; vibrational motion; conservative forces; inertial forces and non-inertial frames; central force motions; rigid bodies and rotational dynamics.
Author(s): Kowalski, Stanley

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Fundamentals of Physics, I
This course provides a thorough introduction to the principles and methods of physics for students who have good preparation in physics and mathematics. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and quantitative reasoning. This course covers Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, gravitation, thermodynamics, and waves.
Author(s): No creator set

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8.03 Physics III (MIT)
Mechanical vibrations and waves, simple harmonic motion, superposition, forced vibrations and resonance, coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibrations of continuous systems, reflection and refraction, phase and group velocity. Optics, wave solutions to Maxwell's equations, polarization, Snell's law, interference, Huygens's principle, Fraunhofer diffraction, and gratings.
Author(s): Mavalvala, Nergis,Greytak, Thomas

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8.701 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (MIT)
The phenomenology and experimental foundations of particle and nuclear physics are explored in this course. Emphasis is on the fundamental forces and particles, as well as composites.
Author(s): Surrow, Bernd

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22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT)
The topics covered under this course include elements of nuclear physics for engineering students, basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations, quantum mechanical calculations of deuteron bound-state wave function and energy, n-p scattering cross-section, transition probability per unit time and barrier transmission probability. Also explored are binding energy and nuclear stability, interactions of charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays with matter, radioactive decays, energetic
Author(s): Chen, Sow-Hsin

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8.022 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism (MIT)
Course 8.022 is one of several second-term freshman physics courses offered at MIT. It is geared towards students who are looking for a thorough and challenging introduction to electricity and magnetism. Topics covered include: Electric and magnetic field and potential; introduction to special relativity; Maxwell's equations, in both differential and integral form; and properties of dielectrics and magnetic materials. In addition to the theoretical subject matter, several experiments in electric
Author(s): Sciolla, Gabriella

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8.01T Physics I (MIT)
This freshman-level course is an introduction to classical mechanics. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which features small group interaction via table-top experiments utilizing laptops for data acquisition and problem solving workshops. Acknowledgements The TEAL project is supported by The Alex and Brit d'Arbeloff Fund for Excellence in MIT Education, MIT iCampus, the Davis Educational Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Class of 1960
Author(s): Surrow, Bernd,Litster, J. David,Dourmashkin, Peter

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8.03 Physics III: Vibrations and Waves (MIT)
In addition to the traditional topics of mechanical vibrations and waves, coupled oscillators, and electro-magnetic radiation, students will also learn about musical instruments, red sunsets, glories, coronae, rainbows, haloes, X-ray binaries, neutron stars, black holes and big-bang cosmology. OpenCourseWare presents another version of 8.03 that features a full set of lecture notes and take-home experiments. Also by Walter Lewin Courses: Classical Mechanics (8.01)- with a com
Author(s): Mavalvala, Nergis,Lewin, Walter,Ketterle, Wolfgang

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8.08 Statistical Physics II (MIT)
This course covers probability distributions for classical and quantum systems. Topics include: Microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical partition-functions and associated thermodynamic potentials. Also discussed are conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium for homogenous and heterogenous systems. The course follows 8.044, Statistical Physics I, and is second in this series of undergraduate Statistical Physics courses.
Author(s): Wen, Xiao-Gang

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8.06 Quantum Physics III (MIT)
Together, this course and its predecessor, 8.05: Quantum Physics II, cover quantum physics with applications drawn from modern physics. Topics in this course include units, time-independent approximation methods, the structure of one- and two-electron atoms, charged particles in a magnetic field, scattering, and time-dependent perturbation theory. In this second term, students are required to research and write a paper on a topic related to the content of 8.05 and 8.06.
Author(s): Rajagopal, Krishna

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8.05 Quantum Physics II (MIT)
Together, this course and 8.06: Quantum Physics III cover quantum physics with applications drawn from modern physics. Topics covered in this course include the general formalism of quantum mechanics, harmonic oscillator, quantum mechanics in three-dimensions, angular momentum, spin, and addition of angular momentum.
Author(s): Stewart, Iain

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)
8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositenes
Author(s): Chen, Min

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8.871 Selected Topics in Theoretical Particle Physics: Branes and Gauge Theory Dynamics (MIT)
This course is an introduction to branes in string theory and their world volume dynamics. Instead of looking at the theory from the point of view of the world-sheet observer, we will approach the problem from the point of view of an observer which lives on a brane. Instead of writing down conformal field theory on the world-sheet and studying the properties of these theories, we will look at various branes in string theory and ask how the physics on their world-volume looks like.
Author(s): Hanany, Amihay

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8.04 Quantum Physics I (MIT)
This course covers the experimental basis of quantum physics, introduces wave mechanics, Schrödinger's equation in a single dimension, and Schrödinger's equation in three dimensions.
Author(s): Vuletic, Vladan

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8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)
Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective
Author(s): Mirny, Leonid,Kardar, Mehran

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STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT)
This class explores the changing roles of physics and physicists during the 20th century. Topics range from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to high-energy physics and cosmology. The course also examines the development of modern physics within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts, such as physics in Imperial Britain, Nazi Germany, U.S. efforts during World War II, and physicists' roles during the Cold War.
Author(s): Kaiser, David

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22.012 Seminar: Fusion and Plasma Physics (MIT)
This course uses lectures and discussion to introduce the range of topics relevant to plasma physics and fusion engineering. An introductory discussion of the economic and ecological motivation for the development of fusion power is also presented. Contemporary magnetic confinement schemes, theoretical questions, and engineering considerations are presented by expert guest lecturers. Students enrolled in the course also tour the Plasma Science and Fusion Center experimental facilities.
Author(s): Molvig, Kim

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