The World of Biophysics
In this Wichita State University program, Don Lamb, professor of physical chemistry at Ludwig University of Munich, delivers a lecture on the biophysics. Dr. Lamb explains the history of biophysics and how the intersection of biology and physics helps to explain living systems. Lamb discusses his research into the world of biophysics and fluorescence. Grades 10-12. 58:56 min.
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The History of Mathematics - BBC
Mathematics is the Empress of the Sciences. Without her, there would be no physics, nor chemistry, nor cosmology. Any field of study depending on statistics, geometry, or any kind of calculation would simply cease to be. And then, there are the practical applications: without math there would be no architecture. No commerce. No accurate maps, or time-keeping: therefore no navigation, nor aviation, nor astronomy.

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Conduction
Eureka! looks at the process of conduction, explaining that the application of heat to an object makes the molecules or atoms vibrate faster and cause a sort of "domino effect."  Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level. 
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Eureka! Convection Episode 27
This program explains how the principle of buoyancy is responsible for the process of heat transfer called convection. Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level.
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Mechanical Advantage and Friction
Professors A and B compare the mechanical advantage of an inclined plane with that of a lever. Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level. 
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The Lever
Eureka! demonstrates the principle of the lever: "The longer the arm of the lever to which force is applied, the less that force need be." Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level.
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The Screw and The Wheel
This program provides examples and definitions of a screw and a wheel; a screw is simply a twisted inclined plane; a wheel is simply a circular lever, whose fulcrum has become an axle. Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level. 
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Eureka! Episode 2 - Mass
Building on the concept of inertia, Eureka! adds the factor of mass, tells how it's measured, and shows how it differs from size. Concept: Inertia increases with mass. Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level.
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Weight vs. Mass
Eureka! explains the difference between weight and mass, and shows how only mass is the same on the moon and on the earth. Eureka was a series of short cartoons on physics that ran on public television in the 1980's.  The video explains the concept in simple and well illustrated way.  Good for students of any elementary school level.  Run time 04:46.
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Centripetal Force: the Roller Coaster
What can we learn about physics from an amusement park ride? This videosegment, produced for Teachers' Domain, uses roller coaster footage to demonstrate that what really keeps people pinned to their seats as a roller coaster hurtles through a loop isn't just the seat belts, it's centripetal force. To reinforce this important scientific principle,a physics teacher successfully swings a cup of water around his head without spilling a drop. Run time 04:40.
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Physics with Mr. Noon: Electric Current, Part 1
This was filmed inside a class room and the camera is a little shaky. Here are some high school physics demonstrations dealing with current electricity.
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The Innovation of Aztec Architecture
The great civilization of the Aztecs built phenomenal structures, including temples, shrines, and causeways. Development in the area of architecture was affected equally by both the implications of the time period and their religion. Suitable for high school students. (Note-- Educators/Parents: Documentary speaks of human sacrifice.)
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Conservation of Energy
The myth of the energy crisis. According to one of the major laws of physics, energy is neither created nor destroyed.
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Demo of Action and Reaction
See action and reaction demonstrated with a tug of war. The force of the tug of war is measured with scales. This video is a demonstration explained by a teacher, Paul Hewitt, in front of the classroom.  This is a brief clip from the DVD series "Conceptual Physics." Run time 01:35.
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Learning As We Grow: Development and Learning -Session 2
This program examines the concept of readiness for learning and
illustrates how developmental pathways — including physical, cognitive, and linguistic — all play a part in students’ learning. Featured are a first-grade teacher, a seventh- and eighth-grade science teacher, and a senior physics teacher, with expert commentary from University of California at Santa Cruz professor Roland Tharp and Yale University professor James P. Comer.

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Workshop 2: Drag Races
Forces can help put objects into motion and can also bring moving objects to a stop. In this workshop, fifth-grade students explore the physics of motion using plastic cars with strings and washers attached to provide a pulling force. The students test the speed of the vehicles and explain what forces bring the vehicles to a stop, as the cars collide with and displace ba
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Dennis Hong - My Seven Species of Robot
At TEDxNASA, Dennis Hong introduces seven award-winnning, all-terrain robots -- like the humanoid, soccer-playing DARwIn and the cliff-gripping CLIMBeR -- all built by his team at RoMeLa, Virginia Tech. Watch to the end to hear the five creative secrets to his lab's incredible technical success. Dennis Hong is the founder and director of RoMeLa -- a Virginia Tech robotics lab that has pioneered several breakthroughs in robot design and engineering. Robots are often inspired by nature, incorporat
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Donald Duck In Mathmagic Land ( Part 1 of 3)
Released in 1959, this timeless Disney cartoon covers various math concepts as the relate to the real world such as the golden ratio, architecture, music, Pythagoras, and infinity.


As Walt Disney explained, "The cartoon is a good medium to stimulate interest. We have recently explained mathematics in a film and in that way excited public interest in this very important subject."
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Donald Duck In Mathmagic Land (Part 2 of 3)

Released in 1959, this timeless Disney cartoon covers various math concepts as the relate to the real world such as the golden ratio, architecture, music, Pythagoras, and infinity.  

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Lost Civilization - Maya - 1 of 6
Narrated by Sam Waterston, this documentary focuses on the history of Mayan civilization. 'The Maya is a Mesoamerican civilization, noted for the only known fully developed written language of the pre-Columbian Americas, as well as its art, architecture, and mathematical and astronomical systems.' (Maya Civilization, Wikipedia, 2009). This documentary is suitable for older middle and high school students.
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