Introduction to European politics
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2009 This module seeks to provide students with an understanding of the rationale and key stages of European integration, as well as of the institutions of the European Union and its functioning. Topics covered will include an overview of the History of European integration, key approaches to integration, the main institutions (Council, Commission, Court of Justice, European Parliament)
Author(s): Guerra Simona Dr;Bieler Andreas Prof

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Understanding global politics
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module introduces global politics through the major theoretical, historical and empirical ways of seeing international relations. Different claims, about, for example, human nature, power, war, peace, the state, society, law and politics are offered by thinkers who exercise a major influence on our contemporary understanding. These claims contribute to different approaches to
Author(s): Carey Sabine Dr;Zhang Xiaoke Dr;Pupavac Vanessa Dr

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Understanding global politics
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module introduces global politics through the major theoretical, historical and empirical ways of seeing international relations. Different claims, about, for example, human nature, power, war, peace, the state, society, law and politics are offered by thinkers who exercise a major influence on our contemporary understanding. These claims contribute to different approaches to
Author(s): Carey Sabine Dr;Zhang Xiaoke Dr;Pupavac Vanessa Dr

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Government of the UK and Ireland
The module is designed to provoke thought, challenge preconceptions, stimulate questions about the nature of government in the UK and Ireland. Thus, it considers key concepts such as political culture, socialisation, devolution, and governance. This module aims to provoke thought, challenge preconceptions, stimulate questions and to nourish inquisitive minds more than to provide a set diet of ready-made `answers'. What are the contextual parameters within which modern government functions? What
Author(s): Dr Cathy Gormley-Heenan

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Mass media in America
This module analyzes the foundations of mass media in America as well as the political and technological developments that generate change. The primary focus is upon news disseminated by television, newspapers, radio, and the internet as the chief sources of current information about the world.
Author(s): Dr Jon Parker, Keele University

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Video: Mark McKinnon offers insider’s perspective on national political campaigns
An award-winning national media producer and communications strategist whose clients have included President George W. Bush and Sen. John McCain discussed key elements of successful campaigns with students in a political science class taught by John Geer and Roy Neel. Mark McKinnon, vice chairman of the Austin-based Public Strategies Inc., was a guest lecturer Oct.keep reading »
Author(s): Vanderbilt News Service

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Video: Genetics and politics
Professor John Alford of Rice University speaks about the correlation between genetics and politics. This MLAS Fall 2010 class, led by Professors John Geer and David Bader, explores how genetics might influence politics. Read more >> Contact: news@vanderbilt.edu (615) 322-NEWS
Author(s): Vanderbilt News Service

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17.202 Graduate Seminar in American Politics II (MIT)
This is the second in a sequence of two field seminars in American politics intended for graduate students in political science, in preparation for taking the general examination in American politics. The material covered in this semester focuses on American political institutions. The readings covered here are not comprehensive, but it is sufficiently broad to give students an introduction to major empirical questions and theoretical approaches that guide the study of American political institu
Author(s): Stewart III, Charles

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)
This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics (2) Electoral Politics (3) Interest Group Politics and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part o
Author(s): Samuels, Richard J.

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)
This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics (2) Electoral Politics (3) Interest Group Politics and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part o
Author(s): Samuels, Richard J.

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)
This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics (2) Electoral Politics (3) Interest Group Politics and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part o
Author(s): Samuels, Richard J.

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21F.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)
International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distribute
Author(s): Resnick, Margery

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11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT)
This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissi
Author(s): Vale, Lawrence

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SP.691 Studies in Women's Life Narratives: Feminist Inquiry (MIT)
Feminist Inquiry starts with questions: What is feminism? What is feminist scholarship? Is feminist scholarship inherently interdisciplinary? Must feminist work interrogate disciplinarity? Must feminists collaborate? Our aim is to promote the development of feminist theory and methods by providing a forum for sharing, assessing, discussing and debating strategies used by feminist scholars to study topics such as gender and the body; sexualities; color and whiteness; migration, colonialism, and i
Author(s): Maher, Frinde,Bergland, Renee

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)
<p>This course is designed as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's and Gender Studies, an academic area of study focused on the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts f
Author(s): Surkan, Kim

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Video: Mark McKinnon offers insider’s perspective on national political campaigns
An award-winning national media producer and communications strategist whose clients have included President George W. Bush and Sen. John McCain discussed key elements of successful campaigns with students in a political science class taught by John Geer and Roy Neel. Mark McKinnon, vice chairman of the Austin-based Public Strategies Inc., was a guest lecturer Oct.keep reading »
Author(s): Vanderbilt News Service

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VUCast: Vanderbilt’s ties to Goldilocks
See how Vanderbilt helped find Goldilocks; find out which political science professor is helping NBC with election coverage; and you’re never too young to support the Commodores!
Author(s): Vanderbilt News Service

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Video: “It’s Bigger than Hip Hop: Art, Race and Politics”
Watch award-winning author and filmmaker M.K. Asante deliver Vanderbilt’s annual Walter R. Murray Jr. Lecture. Hailed by the Philadelphia Inquirer as “a rare, remarkable talent that brings to mind the great artists of the Harlem Renaissance,” Asante is the author of three celebrated books and films. Murray was the first African American to serve onkeep reading »
Author(s): Vanderbilt News Service

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Parliament in Crisis
Professor Mark Knights chairs a podcast discussion on Parliament in Crisis, 1832 and 2009 with Dr Joe Hardwick and Dr Sarah Richardson.
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Buying the War
Four years ago on May 1, President Bush landed on the aircraft carrier USS lincoln and delivered a speech in front of a giant "Mission Accomplished" banner. Despite profound questions and the increasing violence in Baghdad, many in the press confirmed the White House's claim that the war was won. How did they get it so wrong? How did the evidence disputing the existence of weapons of mass destruction and the link between Saddam Hussein and 9/11 continue to go largely unreported?Author(s): No creator set

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