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Zinnen bouwen : Steloefeningen
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Zeven werkbladen op het plaatsen van woorden in de juiste volgorde.


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3.4 Self-assessment questions and problems

SAQ 13

Find |z| and Arg z in each of the following cases.

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    Introduction

    This unit lays the foundations of the subject of mechanics. Mechanics is concerned with how and why objects stay put, and how and why they move. In particular, this unit – Modelling static problems – considers why objects stay put.

    Please note that this unit assumes you have a good working knowledge of vectors.

    This is an adapted extract from the Open University course Author(s): The Open University

    Acknowledgements

    The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

    All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.


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    First-order differential equations

    This unit introduces the topic of differential equations. The subject is developed without assuming that you have come across it before, but it is taken for granted that you have a basic grounding in calculus. In particular, you will need to have a good grasp of the basic rules for differentiation and integration.

    This unit is an adapted extract from the course Mathematical methods and
    Author(s): The Open University

    Acknowledgements

    All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.


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    1.3: Summing vectors given in geometric form

    The following activity illustrates how the conversion processes outlined in the preceding sections may come in useful. If two vectors are given in geometric form, and their sum is sought in the same form, one approach is to convert each of the vectors into component form, add their corresponding components, and then convert the sum back to geometric form.

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    1.2: Converting to geometric form

    You have seen how any vector given in geometric form, in terms of magnitude and direction, can be written in component form. You will now see how conversion in the opposite sense may be achieved, starting from component form. In other words, given a vector a = a 1 i + a 2 j, what are its magnitude |a| and direction θ?

    The first part of this question is dealt with using Pythagoras’ Theorem: the magnitude of a v
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    Acknowledgements

    All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.


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    2.2 Vibrant civil societies and a networked globe

    One thing is common to all three attempts to find a route to a sustainable economy and society: in different ways they all assume that people will get actively involved in making human societies more sustainable. But this transformation will not take place through the corporate world's promises, by local protectionism, a return to ‘strong states’ or the publication of numerous indicators. Any of the three positions outlined above requires interactions and feedbacks created by a vibrant
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    Learning outcomes

    By the end of this unit you will:

    • Have gained an understanding of the four dimensions of globalisation in relation to climate change;

    • Be able to distinguish between the three approaches to achieve sustainability;

    • Know the difference between ‘government’ and ‘governance’;

    • Identify what makes ecological citizenship distinctive;

    • Understand how the medium of the web can aid transitions to sustainability.


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