3.2 Consciousness of the body

Phenomenological theorists distinguish between the subjective body (as lived and experienced) and the objective body (as observed and scientifically investigated). These are not two different bodies as such (phenomenologists pride themselves on overcoming dualisms!); rather they are different facets of our experience and consciousness.

The body-subject, or subjective body, is the body-as-it-is-lived. I do not simply possess a body; I am my body (Merleau-Ponty, 1962
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4.3 Attending across modalities

The preceding section raised the issue of attention operating (and to some extent failing) across two sensory modalities. By focusing on distraction we ignored the fact that sight and sound (and other senses) often convey mutually supporting information. A classic example is lip-reading. Although few of us would claim any lip-reading skills, it turns out that, particularly in noisy surroundings, we supplement our hearing considerably by watching lip movements. If attention is concerned with u
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3.7.2 Use of computers by deaf or hard of hearing people

In general, people who are deaf or hard of hearing do not require any specific assistive technology in order to use a computer effectively.

  • Deaf people can access visual output and can use a mouse.

  • Hearing aid users may connect their aid to the computer's speakers or an amplifier in order to hear audio output better.

  • Severely deaf people may change the computer's settings so that it provides alternatives to audio aler
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3 What does the data tell us?

Data never gives you the answers: it helps you to ask the questions.

(Hawker, 1998)

Realistically, what governors can glean from attainment data, without assistance from the professionals, either in school or through the Local Authority (LA), may be limited, depending on your experience of reading statistical information.

A single set of figures, relating to only one year's results, may n
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1.3. Moving forward

Language is constantly changing: words come and go and human history is caught like a fly in amber in words we use without thinking every day. By developing in our students the awareness of links, cognates, changes in meaning, oddities of spelling and sound, we enrich not just their mother tongue and foreign languages but their knowledge of global history of the last two thousand years.

The state
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1.1 Teaching languages: language awareness

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Acknowledgements

Author Details

This unit was prepared for TeachandLearn.net by Ronnie Goldstein and Alan Bloomfield. Ronnie Goldstein was formerly a lecturer in the Faculty of Educational and Language Studies at The Open University. Alan Bloomfield is Deputy Head of School of Education at Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education.

Other acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Pr
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References

Bills, C. (2002) ‘Mental mathematics’ in Haggarty, L. (ed.), Aspects of Teaching Secondary Mathematics: Perspectives on Practice, London, Routledge.
Mason, J. (1988) ‘Imagery, imagination and mathematics classrooms’ in Pimm, D. (ed.), Mathematics, Teachers and Children, Sevenoaks, Hodder and Stoughton.
The Open University (1988) ME234 Using Mathemati
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2.3 Co-analysis of practice

Carrying out observations of the student teacher is an important part of mentor activity and one of the major ways that mentors gather evidence to improve practice. Observations are most useful when they are followed by an opportunity for the mentor and student teacher to debrief the session, consider the implications of what happened and set targets for further development. This process of observation and debriefing is called co-analysis of practice.

Observations provide evidence for f
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1.5.4 The 5 Ds

If you don’t use a system at all, then you could suffer from the effects of information overload:

  • losing important information

  • wasting time on trying to find things

  • ending up with piles of physical and virtual stuff everywhere

One technique you might like to apply to your files (be they paper or electronic) is the 5Ds. Try applying these and see if you can reduce your information overload.


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Las formas que se utilizan para definir el arte

Actividad 4

¿Recuerda algunas de las formas que se utilizan para definir el arte en la discusión que acaba de oír? Vaya a la transcripción del extracto 2 y anote las fórmulas utilizadas para definir el arte.


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2 Community

As you've just seen, ‘community’, an ever present word, evokes some contrasting meanings. It has been described as a ‘keyword’, that is, a word which has its own particular history but which also plays a significant role in putting across different meanings. Identifying a keyword is to go further than just giving a dictionary definition because:

Keywords have been more than ways of seeing: they have been influe
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1.6 Unofficial work cultures

The whole issue of bodily care and bodily functions tends to be driven underground and then emerges in jokes or crudeness. Picture this scene, a few months after Marie has started, when she has become more settled within the care team.

It was quite late on a Saturday night and a group of the younger staff
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References

CCETSW (1995) Assuring Quality in the Diploma in Social Work – 1, Rules and Requirements for the Diploma in Social Work, Central Council forEducation and Training in Social Work, London.
Goffman, E. (1971; first published 1959) The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Penguin, Harmondsworth.
Mackay, L. (1993) Conflicts in Care: Medicine and Nursing, Ch
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1.3.1 Social interactions

The sociologist Erving Goffman studied how people relate to each other across a wide range of situations. According to him, each of us enters into ‘social interactions’ with an interest in trying to control what goes on. A social interaction is any kind of situation in which people communicate with each other or do things together. After all, much of what we do in life, we do through dealings with other people. We negotiate the routine business of daily life through interactions wi
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Introduction

The current political agenda requires service users' views to be incorporated into the design of health and social care services (Department of Health, 2006). Services are assessed by the quality of the outcomes they provide for users. Frontline managers are responsible for gathering service user views on their needs. Whose views should be taken into account? How do managers gather views? This unit helps you consider ways of getting feedback from service users, and shows the inclusive approac
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1.2 Hearing about critical practice

Activity 2

1 hour 0 minutes

Listen to the following audio clips, ‘Panel discussion on critical practice’, Part 1: Critical practice.


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2.2.2 Florence Foster

In 2000, Florence Foster was in her sixties. For a number of years, she had lived in a tenement in Dundee owned by a private landlord. As she describes in the programme, her accommodation was extremely damp and difficult to heat. There was green mould growing in the wardrobe in her bedroom, and all the window frames were rotten. She was dependent on electric fires for heating, which she had to pay for through a card meter. Her weekly income did not enable her to put sufficient cards in the me
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6.1 Empowerment and advocacy

Qualified social workers are expected to have the necessary skills to empower service users to participate in assessments and decision making and also to ensure that service users have access to advocacy services if they are unable to represent their own views. The requirement for these skills can be found in the key role ‘Support, representation and advocacy’. Both empowerment and advocacy are concerned with power and the ways in which it is distributed between people. Empowerment and ad
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2.8 References for Extract 1

Banks, S. (2001) Ethics and Values in Social Work, 2nd edn, London, BASW/Macmillan.

British Association of Social Workers (BASW) (2002) Code of Ethics for Social Work, BASW,

Dalrymple, J. and Burke, B. (1995) Anti Oppressive Practice and the Law, Buckingham, Open University Press.

Howe, D. (1999) ‘Values in Social Work’ in Davies, M., Howe, D. and Kohli, R. Assessing Competence and
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