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Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this unit are:

  • review some of the recent debates about the place of geography in the school curriculum;

  • consider the different aims of geographical education;

  • links for further study

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are:

  • to review a job description for a business manager that takes account of today's context;

  • to understand how a business manager can support teaching and learning and all stakeholders;

  • to understand and use a range of analytical tools;

  • to apply these analytical tools to your school's situation, in particular responding to government agendas;

  • to understand how benchmarking data can
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should:

  • have developed a greater awareness of the phonic and historic connections between the vocabularies of the target language and English and other mother tongues of students;

  • be able to demonstrate how and where to use students' knowledge of English and other languages when introducing new target language vocabulary and when developing students' reading skills.

Learning outcomes

In this unit we will look at:

  • why the global dimension in science is so important;

  • what contributions have been made to science by ‘non-Western’ scientists;

  • how to deliver the curriculum so as to bring global science to life for students. Many teachers have found that including the global dimension in science is exciting and motivating for both teachers and students – we hope you do too!

References

Croall, H. (1998) Crime and Society in Britain, Harlow, Addison Wesley Longman.
Smith, D.J. (1997) ‘Ethnic origins, crime and criminal justice’ in Maguire, M., Morgan, R. and Reiner, R. (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology (2nd edn), Oxford, Clarendon Press.
Zedner, L. (1997) ‘Victims’ in Maguire, M., Morgan, R. and Reiner, R. (eds) The
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • recognise some of the skills which are particularly associated with the way social scientists work;

  • describe some basic techniques relating to reading, for example, highlighting, note-taking and the processing;

  • write in your own words using references and quoting sources.

Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • illustrate what is social about social science;

  • demonstrate how certain social constructions become dominant;

  • distinguish how labelling something can create expectations about behaviour and actions;

  • give examples of inequalities that result from particular social constructions.

Introduction

Anti-social behaviour, homelessness, drugs, metal illness: all problems in today’s society. But what makes a problem social? This unit will help you to discover how these issues are identified, defined, given meaning and acted upon. You will also look at the conflicts within social science in this area.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Social Policy: Welfare, Power and Diversity (D218) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want
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Acknowledgements

Author Details

Amanda Burrows is a graduate of Laban and gained an MA in Education from The Open University. She has taught dance in secondary schools, FE colleges, universities and in community settings. Amanda is currently Head of Curriculum for Visual, Performing Arts and Media at Grantham College, and has produced materials for the Open Univerity's Teachandlearn.net, repurposed here for openlearn.

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References

Davies, S. White Man Sleeps, performed by Siobhan Davies Dance Company.
Rist, R. (1991) ‘Dance Science’, The Dancing Times, December 1991, p. 243.

Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will:

  • appreciate the importance of the Euro-zone economy as a player in the international economic system;

  • recognise the importance and role played by the European Central Bank in the conduct of Euro-zone monetary policy;

  • understand the relationship between monetary policy and fiscal policy in the management of the European economy;

  • reflect on the consequences of Euro-zone enlargement for the conduct econo
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:


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Acknowledgements

The following extracts are from the Study Guide which forms part of an Open University, UK, MA in Education course E841 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Worldwide and part of LING 936, 937, 938, units of programs in Applied Linguistics of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

These materials were produced and developed jointly by The Open University and Macquarie University. First published 2000, Reprinted 2001.

Copyright © The Open University and Macqua
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will have:

  • gained an understanding of ways that spoken language is used to create joint knowledge and understanding, and to pursue teaching and learning;

  • considered the educational implications of some recent research on teaching and learning in face-to-face interactions;

  • tried out some approaches to analysing the spoken language of teaching and learning.

Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • provide a definition of identity;

  • recognise how gender and socio-economic categories such as class can be used as a source of identity;

  • discuss social structures in terms of gender, class and nation.

The Open University course team
Using the US and Mexico as the main example, this unit examines how inequalities in access to material wealth can lead to border tensions. You will also learn how many developed economies are now reliant on immigrant labour to perform jobs that their own citizens do not want to consider. How equal is the globalised world?
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • explain how Acts of Parliament originate;

  • discuss the process by which rules become law;

  • understand the role of Parliament in making legal rules;

  • understand the difference between primary and delegated legislation;

  • understand the role of delegated legislation;

  • read and discuss Acts of Parliament;

  • evaluate the influence of pressure groups on
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References

Cowie, F. and Bradney, A. (2000), English Legal System in Context, London, Butterworths, pp. 88–90.
‘Extending and developing your thinking skills’, Open University Student Toolkit 9.
Slapper, G. (2000) ‘Castles built on law’, New Law Journal, 23 June.
Slapper, G. and Kelly, D. (2003) The
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • develop your understanding of the process of teaching and learning in classrooms, and the role of language in that process;

  • appreciate how a sociocultural approach can be used to make critical, constructive analyses of classroom interaction in a variety of second language learning contexts;

  • use this knowledge to reflect on second language learning processes in the classrooms you know.


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