Are Europeans Heading Toward the Same Economy?
Can Europe's variety of economic systems be explained by differences in culture and values? And can such differences survive the homogenising impact of globalisation? Yann Algan is professor of economics at Sciences Po, Paris.
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Comparing with Good, Better, and Best
This computer-animated video features circus performers making comparisons using the words good, better, and best. ( :40)
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Lab 7: System Response, Analog and Digital Filters
Nasser Kehtarnavaz, Philipos Loizou, Mohammad Rahman


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La nouvelle
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An Interactive Approach to Signals and Systems Laboratory
Nasser Kehtarnavaz, Philipos Loizou, Mohammad Rahman


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Lab 5: CTFT and Its Applications
Nasser Kehtarnavaz, Philipos Loizou, Mohammad Rahman


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Lab 4: Fourier Series and Its Applications
Nasser Kehtarnavaz, Philipos Loizou, Mohammad Rahman


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Lab 6: Analog-to-Digital Conversion, DTFT and DFT
Nasser Kehtarnavaz, Philipos Loizou, Mohammad Rahman


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The Red Flag: Communism and the Making of the Modern World
Communism was one of the most powerful political and intellectual movements of the modern world, and its collapse in 1989 had an enormous impact on our views of international affairs and economics. David Priestland argues that we have found it difficult to understand Communism, and the lessons we have learnt have contributed to many recent policy failures, from the 'War on Terror' to extreme neo-liberal economic policies. He revisits the history of Communism, explaining the reasons for its rise
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Mixing Oil and Ecosystems
“An oil spill is a crime scene,” says Christopher Reddy, but quite unlike the kind in TV whodunits, where fictional forensic whizzes help nail down perpetrators with an arsenal of lab tools. For Reddy, a chemist involved in analyzing oil spills, investigations take years, and do not always yield certain results.
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Einstein at the Beach
This is an excerpt of the minimalist composer Phillip Glass's Einstein on the Beach play.  The composing technique that became minimalism was influenced by the repetative improvisations of many asian countries including India, Java, and Bali.  It is also theorized that it was in reaction to the complexity and constant changes of serialism.  Minimalism is know for its limited vocabulary be it rhythmic, melodic, harmonic, or instrumental.
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Economics 0-Reality 1
Has the credit crunch exposed the futility of academic economics? Should LSE be closed down and converted into something more socially productive? In this lecture John Lanchester challenges the profession of economics with fundamental questions about its purpose and direction.
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Games Technologies for Learning
The Games Technologies for Learning report explores the ways in which games technologies can be used to enhance teaching and learning, and provides advice for schools and colleges wishing to introduce...
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Pirates of the Atlantic
Piracy is equal parts economics and adventure. Author Carson Hudson describes the lust for treasure.Author(s): No creator set

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11.202 Gateway: Planning Economics (MIT)
Planning Economics (11.202) is a course that runs for the last one-third of a semester and covers economics topics of particular interest to city planning students: location theory, the interplay between externalities and zoning, international trade and globalization, and housing finance. Few incoming students have had prior exposure to these topics.The first two-thirds of the semester is given over to Microeconomics (11.203). It is designed for incoming city planning students with little or no
Author(s): Levy, Frank

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Dilations
A dilation is a non-rigid transformation, which means that the original and the image are not congruent. They are, however, similar figures. This video demonstrates how to perform dilations. (2:25)
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Nobel Prize in Physics: George F. Smoot
Cosmologist George F. Smoot, who led a team that obtained the first images of the infant universe, confirming the predictions of the Big Bang theory of its origins, has been awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics. Smoot, a professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley, and an astrophysicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), shares the prize with John C. Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. This is UC Berkeley's twentieth Nobel Prize since
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Environments of Africa
EARTH 105 investigates the interrelationships between geology, hydrology, land use and human development in several areas of Africa. We focus primarily on regions north of the equator, although there is a brife segment on South African mining. Specific topics include the Nile River (sources of the Nile, agricultural practices, effects of damming the Nile, and hydropolitics), the Sahara and Sahel (salt mines, climate change, drought, and wather resources), and natural resources and their role in
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Behavioral Economics and Decision Making
Have you ever wondered if people are *really* rational? For the last hundred years economic theory has been built on the underlying assumption that people are rational. The field of behavioral economics and decision making both challenge this fundamental assumption by showing in a variety context, people's judgments are not rational. In this brief six week course, we will go through an overview of some of the main points in the field exploring things like prospect theory, the endowment effect, h
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Game Theory
This course is an introduction to game theory and strategic thinking. Ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, evolutionary stability, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, adverse selection, and signaling are discussed and applied to games played in class and to examples drawn from economics, politics, the movies, and elsewhere.
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