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Song About the Number Two
Sock puppets from They Might Be Giants sing about the number 2. The video shows many sets of two and the numeral two. The song about the number 2 starts at 0:57 and ends at 3:12.  (07:06)
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Meanings of the Election Results (Podcast)
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Gamestudio : Maak je eigen games
Schermafbeelding_2010-06-07_om_15.05.34.png

Met de GameKit kun je snel en makkelijk zelf games bouwen. Maar niet alleen kun je helemaal zelf games bouwen, je kunt alle andere spellen van de site openen en veranderen of er extra levels bij bouwen. 


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Managing coastal environments
Coastal environments are by their nature ever-changing. This unit looks at the example of the Blackwater Estuary in Essex, England, describing how the current state of the estuary came to be. It examines the contests and conflicts that centre on the estuary in terms of managing the environment for human needs and the needs of the other species who make their habitat there.Author(s): Creator not set

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6.2 Specific difficulties

Some students contend with physical difficulties in reading. Here is one:

And here is another being offered advice by a friend:

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Introduction

You may be studying this unit because you – or a member of your family or a friend – have been personally affected by cardiovascular diseases in some way. You may be professionally involved in looking after people with one of these diseases. Perhaps you are interested in health issues in general. Whatever your motivation or underlying reasons for studying this unit, you will gain valuable insights into the extent of cardiovascular diseases and their treatment in the early twenty-first cen
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7.2 Square roots

Earlier you met the square function and on most calculators the square root is the second function on the same key. Look to see if this is the case for your calculator and check the calculator handbook on how to use this function. In many cases you will need to press the square root key before the number, instead of afterwards, as for the square key. This is the case on the TI-84. Check that you can find the square root of 25 and of 0.49 (you should get 5 and .7 respectively).

Now find
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Introduction

You may have met complex numbers before, but not had experience in manipulating them. This unit gives an accessible introduction to complex numbers, which are very important in science and technology, as well as mathematics. The unit includes definitions, concepts and techniques which will be very helpful and interesting to a wide variety of people with a reasonable background in algebra and trigonometry.

This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Complex analysis (M33
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3 Graph sketching

In Section 2 we describe how the graphs of polynomial and rational functions may be sketched by analysing their behaviour – for example, by using techniques of calculus. We assume that you are familiar with basic calculus and that its use is valid. In particular, we assume that the graphs of the functions under consideration consist of smooth curves.

Click 'View document' below to open Section 2 (16 pages, 200KB).

1 Overview

A fundamental concept in mathematics is that of a function.

Consider, for example, the function f defined by

This is an example of a real function, because it associates with a given real number x the real number 2x2 − 1: it maps real numbers to real n
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3.1 Expressing numbers in scientific notation

Earlier you looked at place values for numbers, and why they were called powers of ten.

Place value10 0001000100101Author(s): The Open University

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1.3.7 Internet resources

There are many websites where you will find useful information on maths and statistics. With all information on the internet you need to make a judgement on its reliability.

Royal Statistical Society Information about the Society, its publications, section and groups. Also covers caree
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1.3.2 The fate of incoming solar radiation

Look back at Figure 7. In this schematic representation, what is the fate of incoming solar radiation?

Answer

It is either reflected back to space (31 units) or absorbed by the su
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7.3 Running the models forward

What happens when the models are run forward? It depends upon the models used and the scenarios they are asked to run. It seems almost certain, however, that there will be increases in the global mean surface temperature, to the order of +1.5 to +4.5 °C (– possibly more, according to some models and scenarios.

These changes are predicted to be associated with increases in sea level, changes to weather conditions (e.g. more regular and violent winter storms in the UK) and changes to t
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5.3.4 Plan testing and validation

It is one thing to have a plan; it is another thing to have a plan that you can rely on to work. There is an old military maxim that ‘A plan only gets you into first contact with the enemy. After that, you fly by the seat of your pants’ (Anon). A 1993 IBM report on business continuity planning confirmed this when it revealed that ‘half of the plans failed completely or substantially when they were first tested’ (IBM, 1993, p. 5).

The IBM report identified three categories of pla
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5.7.1 Plan preparation

Perhaps the first question to ask is ‘What is an emergency plan?’ Dodswell, in his guide to business continuity management, defined an ‘emergency management plan’ as simply:

A plan which supports the emergency management team by providing them with information and guidelines.

(Dodswell, 2000, p. 56)

Another definition, of an ‘emergency preparedness plan’ prepared in the co
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5.6 Business continuity planning

An organisation's strategy regarding insurance for its business risks is no substitute for high-quality risk management and emergency preparedness to address all contingencies. Some incidents we have mentioned above. Others may involve IT security for example. While the day-to-day activity of an organisation may not be particularly hazardous, it can still be affected by a hazard not of its own making. Examples might be a natural disaster such as flooding, or a hazardous activity on an adjacen
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4.1 Human predation and extinctions

There are a number of ways in which humans have altered ecosystems, that have led to the decline of particular species. We will leave to one side any major interference such as felling forests to provide land for agricultural and urban development, and instead begin by looking at examples where we have eroded or eradicated stocks of particular species. This has notably been a consequence of the over-exploitation of food species (prey items). Predators do not normally eliminate their prey (see
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3 3 Present energy sources and sustainability

What are the principal energy sources at present, and how sustainable are they?

About 80 per cent of the world's energy is currently supplied by fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas. Present estimates suggest that, at current consumption rates, there are over 200-years' worth of coal left, 60-years' of gas, and 40-years' of oil. Fossil fuels are hydrocarbons, and their combustion releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, one of the main causes of the human-induced
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