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2.1.2 Disability

Any restriction or lack (resulting from an impairment) of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being.


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1 Myths and misconceptions

Physical education provides opportunities for pupils to be creative, competitive and to face up to different challenges as individuals, and in groups and teams. It promotes positive attitudes towards active and healthy lifestyles.

(Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (2004) www.nc.uk.net/esd/teaching/pe/index.htm)

What does this mean for PE teachers? How can PE teachers effectively help to
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4. Music and learning

‘In music the sages found pleasure, and saw that it could be used to make the hearts of the people good. Because of the deep influence it exerts on man, and the change it produces in manners and customs, the ancient kings caused it to be one of the subjects of instruction.’

Confucius (551–479 BCE)

Dr Georgi Lozanov has done considerable research into the effects of music on learning,
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3. Review and recall

Learning cannot take place without memory, and we expect our students to be able to process, synthesise and recall a vast amount of information every day. There are, however, some simple strategies that we can employ to help them to do this.

Firstly consider the natural concentration span. A rough guide is that concentration span in minutes is equivalent to chronological age in years, +/− 2 minutes. That means that even our most attentive 18 year olds need a short concentration break
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3.1 What the review is about

‘The performance review process enables me to have a meaningful discussion about issues at the heart of the improvement of the school, with governors who support me yet make me stop and think about why I do what I do and, more importantly, how I might do my job better.’

Quote from headteacher

The review of the headteacher's performance is one of the most important tasks for the governing bo
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you will:

  • be able to state your own motivation for producing self-study Open Educational Resources (OERs);

  • have investigated and analysed some of the research into online learning;

  • have evaluated some examples of educational resources for active open learning;

  • be able to plan a structured learning experience using a range of resources;

  • be able to construct an OpenLearn-style unit by remixing res
    Author(s): The Open University

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2 Finding evidence

If the purpose of monitoring is to ensure that policies and plans are being put into action, it follows that governors should be focusing their attention on finding evidence that supports this.

Governors are not inspectors, and need to be aware of the danger that they could impinge on the role of the headteacher through inappropriate involvement in day-to-day monitoring, rather than operating at the strategic level.

How monitoring is undertaken is a matter for each individual gove
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2.1 Science throughout history: a case of attribution?

Much of the science we now take for granted was first done by scientists outside today's industrialised nations. For example, Arabic medicine was in advance of European medicine throughout the Middle Ages, and from Salerno (the first recorded medical school, founded in the 10th century), to Vesalius (the first person to publish a book of human anatomy, in 1543), Western doctors learned from their Muslim counterparts.

Activity 2 gives an opportunity to learn more about some of
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Introduction

There are many compelling reasons for introducing a global dimension in science education. This unit, aimed at teachers in secondary schools explores why the global dimension in science education is so important and how you might incorporate it in your lessons.

This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from A global dimension to science education in schools (TL_SCIT5) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to e
Author(s): The Open University

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1.7. Resources for further study

Books

  • Potter, S. (1950) Our Language, Penguin.

  • McCrum, R., MacNeil, R., and Cran, W. (2003) The Story of English, Penguin.

  • Stevenson, V. (1983) Words, Mcdonald.

  • Bryson, B. (1991) Mother Tongue, Penguin.

  • Any title by David Crystal.

Reference books

  • Onions, C.T. (1966) The Oxford
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Introduction

This unit looks at visualisation as it relates to mathematics, focusing upon how it can be used to improve learning. It will also identify ways in which to make more use of visualisation within the classroom.


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References

Asimov, I., ‘In my Own View’ in ed. Beare, H. (2001), The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Quoted from ‘Education, Technology and Change’ by Megan Blair (accessed on 22 September, 2005).
http://www.cybertext.net.au/tct2002/disc_papers/organisation/blair.htm
DfES (2002), Extended schools: providing opportunities and services for all, p. 6.
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References

Birkett, D. (2001) ‘The school we'd like’, The Guardian, 5 June 2001. Available from: http://education.guardian.co.uk/schools/story/0,5500,501374,00.html [Accessed 23 November 2003].
Brown, P. (2001) ‘The erosion of geography’, The Guardian, 20 November 2001. Available from: www.education.guardian.co.uk/schools/story/0,5500,597485,00.html [Accessed 20 November 2003].
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2. Does art have a value?

Art has been described as an open concept: a cumulative and developing category of objects and processes, which by its nature is not easily definable. Therefore it might be more relevant to consider how art based activities enhance human aptitudes, abilities and skills.

Some of the skills and values gained from the study of art and art history are listed below. For present purposes these can be subdivided into those that are intrinsic (undertaken for their own sake) and those tha
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Occurrence, Preparation, and Compounds of Oxygen
OpenStax College
By the end of this section, you will be able to: Describe the properties, preparation, and compounds of oxygen Describe the preparation, properties, and uses of some […]

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Distintas citas de personas famosas

Actividad 9

En esta actividad va a leer distintas citas de personas famosas. Utilice un diccionario bilingüe si encuentra palabras que no entiende.

1 Lea las siguientes citas y utilice las palabras que aparecen en el recuad
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1.6.2 Alerts

Online bookshops and some of the major search engines offer ‘Alerts’ services. These work by allowing you to set up a profile once you have registered on their site, and when there are items meeting your criteria you receive an email. The good thing about alerts is that you don’t have to do anything once you have set up your profile. The downside, particularly with alerts services from the search engines, is that given the extent to which internet traffic is on the increase whether new
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Working together for children: Stirling
The care of children, especially those with disabilities, is surrounded by complex issues. Learning to navigate these difficulties while helping children to lead a happy and fulfilling life is the focus of this unit. Video footage from the Plus organisation in Stirling, Scotland, will help you develop a skilled, dynamic and ethical approach to working with children.Author(s): Creator not set

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What's in a title: Understanding meanings in community care
What do we mean by ‘community’, ‘care’ and ‘welfare’? In this unit you will explore the meanings of these words in their historical and cultural settings. The unit does not discuss these terms exclusively in terms of social work practice so service users, carers or anyone interested in community care and the ways in which welfare services are provided would find this unit useful.Author(s): Creator not set

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References

Ahmad, W. and Atkin, K. (1996) ‘Race’ and Community Care, Milton Keynes, Open University Press.
Booth, T. and Booth, W. (1994) Parenting under Pressure: Mothers and fathers with learning difficulties, Buckingham, Open University Press.
Butt, J. and Mirza, K. (1996) Social Care and Black Communities: A review of recent research studies, London, HMSO.<
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