2. Convex Optimization I Lecture 2
science, electrical, engineering, convex, optimization, vector, dual, cone, hyperplane, Euclidean, ball, ellipsoid, polyhedra, semidefinite, linear-fractional, function
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Statistical Mechanics Lecture 2 (April 6, 2009)
classical quantum physics, science, biology, engineering, thermodynamics, math, formula, space, statistics, variable, methodology, probability distribution, entropy, maximize, thermal equilibrium, function, variable, average, minimum value, equation, lamb
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Statistical Mechanics Lecture 7 (May 11, 2009)
science, physics, learning, education, lecture, harmonic oscillator, energy, frequency, partition function, mechanics, quantum states, disc area, annular rings, temperature, black body radiation, wavelength, thermal equilibrium, friction, thermodynamics,
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Statistical Mechanics Lecture 9 (May 25, 2009)
science, physics, mathematics, learning, education, lecture, equation, system, spin, mean field approximation, magnetization, critical point, chemical potential, lagrange mulitplier, correlation function, cosmology
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Acknowledgements

This unit was written by Dr Marion Bowman and Dr Susan Mumm

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for per
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References

Goodman, M. (1997) The Roman World, 44 BC–AD 180, London and New York, Routledge, Routledge History of the Ancient World.
Grant, M. (1996) (trans.) Tacitus: the Annals of Imperial Rome, Harmondsworth, Penguin Books. (First published 1956. Revised edition 1971. Revised with new bibliography 1989. Reprinted with revised bibliography 1996.)
Huskinson, J. (ed.) (
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3.2 Negative freedom

The concept of negative freedom centres on freedom from interference. This type of account of freedom is usually put forward in response to the following sort of question:

What is the area within which the subject – a person or group of persons – is or should be left to do or be what he is able to do or be, without interference by other persons?

(Berlin (1969), pp. 121–2; see, p. 155)


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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should:

  • be able to articulate your own thoughts on the notion of ‘write what you know’;

  • be equipped to write ‘blind’ descriptions of known objects and note new observations;

  • have an enhanced ability to list sensory perceptions;

  • be able to write short texts about a personal memory of either a place or a character.

Introduction

This unit explores the commemoration of war through treating two war memorials – the Sandham Memorial Chapel and the Royal Artillery Memorial – as 'visual texts'. By helping you to respond to visual cues the unit aims for you to develop your understanding of these memorials, not only as memorials, but as artefacts or 'made objects'. It does this through consideration of such factors as the location of the monument; its function and purpose; its symbolism or realism; use of materials and o
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

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5. Automatically Generating Personalized Adaptive User Interfaces (May 2, 2008)
science, technology, computer, engineering, research, user, interface, machine, learning, algorithm, adapt, personalize, motor impairment, handicap, Supple, ++, device, Arnauld, preferences, capability, vision, cost function, customization, Ribbon, intera
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4 Glossary

Open glossary now...

Acknowledgements

Author Details

This unit was originally prepared for TeachandLearn.net by Heather Rendall. Heather is a CiLT Associate Trainer and freelance consultant. Her specialisms are ICT, grammar and reading skills. She continues to research into the ‘how’ of learning.

The Modern Foreign Language units have been developed for TeachandLearn.net in collaboration with CiLT.

Other Acknowled
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References

Anderson, D (1997) V&A Museum, A Common Wealth: Museums in the Learning Age. A Report to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.
Osborne, K. (2004) Exeter Museums Service, at the MLA site Inspiring Learning for All, www.inspiringlearningforall.gov.uk [accessed 23 August 2004].
Inspiring Learning for All (2004) Quotation from a teacher from the London Museums Hub Foc
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Learning outcomes
This unit is concerned with the technique of expressing a periodic function as a sum of terms, where each term is a constant, a sine function or a cosine function. There is a strong analogy with the technique of expressing a (non-periodic) function as a Taylor series, which is a sum of terms that are powers of the independent variable(s); in both cases, working with just the first few terms generally gives a useful approximation. This unit assumes the following background knowledge: the definit
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Introduction
Genomes are composed of DNA, and a knowledge of the structure of DNA is essential to understand how it can function as hereditary material. DNA is remarkable, breathtakingly simple in its structure yet capable of directing all the living processes in a cell, the production of new cells and the development of a fertilized egg to an individual adult. DNA has three key properties: it is relatively stable; its structure suggests an obvious way in which the molecule can be duplicated, or replicated;
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2.2 Species showing torpor or deep hibernation
Hibernation is an ingenious adaptation that some animals employ to survive difficult conditions in winter. This unit examines the differences between hibernation and torpor, and discusses the characteristic signs of hibernation behaviour. It explores the triggers that bring on hibernation, and whether internal signals or external season cues are predominant. It also examines the physiological adaptations that occur in hibernating animals. This unit builds on and develops ideas introduced in the
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Learning outcomes
Hibernation is an ingenious adaptation that some animals employ to survive difficult conditions in winter. This unit examines the differences between hibernation and torpor, and discusses the characteristic signs of hibernation behaviour. It explores the triggers that bring on hibernation, and whether internal signals or external season cues are predominant. It also examines the physiological adaptations that occur in hibernating animals. This unit builds on and develops ideas introduced in the
Author(s): The Open University

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3.4 Arousal
Hibernation is an ingenious adaptation that some animals employ to survive difficult conditions in winter. This unit examines the differences between hibernation and torpor, and discusses the characteristic signs of hibernation behaviour. It explores the triggers that bring on hibernation, and whether internal signals or external season cues are predominant. It also examines the physiological adaptations that occur in hibernating animals. This unit builds on and develops ideas introduced in the
Author(s): The Open University

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5.1 Energy sources in torpor and hibernation
Hibernation is an ingenious adaptation that some animals employ to survive difficult conditions in winter. This unit examines the differences between hibernation and torpor, and discusses the characteristic signs of hibernation behaviour. It explores the triggers that bring on hibernation, and whether internal signals or external season cues are predominant. It also examines the physiological adaptations that occur in hibernating animals. This unit builds on and develops ideas introduced in the
Author(s): The Open University

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