Ursula Hoff Annual Lecture 2014
The Ursula Hoff Annual Public Lecture on "Aboriginal Art Centres - The Good, The bad and the Ugly" 2014 held at RMIT Storey Hall on 16 September explored the role of curators and business in Aboriginal art. With speakers: RMIT Gallery Director Suzanne Davies (introduction); Exhibition curator Dr Jacqueline Healy (Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo at RMIT Gallery 16 September - 8 November; Professor Ian McLean– academic and author; and Sister Alice Dempsey, who played a key role in establishing the
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

The Hon Catherine Branson in conversation with Rob Hulls
RMIT University celebrates the legacy of politician and chief justice George Higinbotham, through an annual public lecture which explores topical legal issues and in particular the interaction between the law and society. The guiding principle for the series is enhancing our understanding of the law and the role of legal and political innovation in helping create a more just society. This year, the Hon Catherine Branson, Former President of the Australian Human Rights Commission presented the 20
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

#330: Margaret Wertheim: Confessions of a science communicator

Celebrated scie
Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Documentaire West Afrika (Togo)

Korte documentaire over het leven in Togo.


Author(s): EduTube

License information
Related content

Rights not set

The Economist explains: Why the Queen still reigns in Canada


Author(s): The Economist

License information
Related content

Rights not set

2.4.1 The theological persepective

If we are thinking about individual perspectives on religion, there are three very common and useful terms we can employ: theism, atheism and agnosticism. In everyday parlance, ‘theism’ denotes a belief in God (or, more broadly, a belief in divine or spiritual realities); ‘atheism’ denotes a conviction that there is no God (or divine or spiritual realities); and ‘agnosticism’ indicates a lack of certainty or knowledge (gnosis) one way or the other. Very broadly spea
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

The Way David Macaulay Works: Finding Ideas, Making Books and Visualizing Our World
This presentation feels akin to a new Disney ride: During your tour inside David Macaulay’s imagination, prepare to soar over Rome’s great monuments, raft within the human body’s circulatory system, and dismantle and rebuild the Empire State Building.

Don’t expect much in the way of explanation or backgrou

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

3.5 The notion of a final solution

Motivating much of Berlin's essay on the two concepts of liberty is a pair of related beliefs. First he believes that the notion of a so-called ‘final solution’, the belief that ultimately all human differences of goal can be reconciled, has led to terrible consequences, often to atrocities. Secondly, he believes that there is not, in principle, any way of resolving the widely different goals that human beings have. There can, then, be no simple panacea to cure all the problems that
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Lecture 5: William Froude - A Sacred Duty to Doubt
David Brown on "William Froude - A Sacred Duty to Doubt". William Froude was born in 1810, and in 1861 published the first theory of ship rolling. This led to studies of powering. Using models he showed that there was no one ideal form and models tested at the corresponding speed could predict accurately the performance of ships; the basis of all later tank testing.
Author(s): David K Brown

License information
Related content

Rights not set

05 - The Enlightenment and the Public Sphere
While the major philosophical projects of the Enlightenment are associated with the names of individual thinkers such as Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Voltaire, the cultural transformation in France in the years leading up to the Revolution should also be understood in the context of the public sphere and popular press. Alongside such luminaries as those associated with Diderot's Encyclopédie were a host of lesser pamphleteers and libellists eager for fame and some degree of fortune. If the writin
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Church for Sale
This Wide Angle video reports on the sale of The Sacred Heart Church in central Limerick, Ireland which has been holding services for almost 150 years.
Author(s): Creator not set

License information
Related content

Rights not set

The Seven Sacraments - Part #4
Discusses the seven sacraments. Talks about how you receive the seven sacraments, sacred in church and being attentive.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

The Tallis Scholars sings Palestrina
The most excellent ensemble The Tallis Scholars, here in a live performance of Nunc Dimittis by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina(1524?-1594).

The Tallis Scholars are a British vocal ensemble normally consisting of two singers per part, with a core group of ten singers.
Formed in 1973 by their director Peter Phillips, they specialise in performing a cappella sacred vocal music written during the Renaissance by composers from all over Europe. They are currently recognised as one

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Renaissance Music 1: Characteristics and Palestrina
The texture is mostly polyphonic.  There are 2 types-secular and sacred music. In sacred music the music is sung by smalll unaccompagnied choirs.  Secular music may be played on small groups of instruments.  Composers of this period are discussed. A powerpoint presentation-easy to take notes. (4:39)
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Ancient Mysteries - The Puzzling Pyramids of Mexico 1/5
Planned and mapped out according to the stars and built over a series of sacred caves, at its height, Teotihuacán was the seventh largest city of the ancient world. Its power and influence was felt throughout Mexico. This documentary is suitable for high school students.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Living History - A Trip to Ancient Olympia
Winning athletes who competed in the Olympic stadium (including barefooted runners) were crowned with wreaths made from sacred olive trees.  Tens of thousands of men, from all parts of Greece, traveled to Olympia to watch or participate.  Women were disallowed.
 (1:01)
In this video clip, see what is left of the stadium and its surroundings.

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

German Christmas Traditions
This video highlights some German Christmas traditions.  Some of these include having multiple Christmas trees in the home, baking specific kinds of sweets, and using Advent calendars.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

8.4 Hinduism in eastern India: religion in Calcutta

The Hinduism of Bengal, as in other regions of India with their own languages and distinctive historical traditions, has absorbed and retained many local elements which make it peculiarly the Hinduism of Bengal. The city of Calcutta has exerted its own considerable influence upon the surrounding region. Calcutta, the capital of West Bengal, was founded in 1690 originally as a British trading post on the Hugli, a stretch of the Ganges (or Ganga), a river sacred to Hindus (see Author(s): No creator set

8.2 The diversity of Hinduism

The complex tradition now known as Hinduism has emerged largely from the coming together of four main elements:

  1. The traditions of the original inhabitants of India, some of which may still continue in the cultures of India's more remote tribal peoples.

  2. The influences of the Indus Valley civilisation that flourished in northwest India until approximately the middle of the second millenium bce.

    <
    Author(s): No creator set

    License information
    Related content

    Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

7.3 ‘Insiders’ and ‘outsiders’

The claim that it is possible to study religion adequately from a disinterested position has been hotly debated. Can the understanding of the observer achieve the same level of insight and authority as the participant in a religion? No serious student of religion can avoid confronting this question.

The ‘outsider’ cannot escape depending to an extent upon insights from ‘insiders’ when studying a particular religion. An ‘outsider’ who has never been through a p
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20