The upside of hard times
This could be the best year of your life; a year of discovery, correction, clearance, and enlightenment. 2009 could be the year that started all wrong and ended so right. The year things came right. Twenty years from now, when sharing life's lessons over a bottle of wine with friends, you might reflect on 2009 as your year of real change; that barrier year between who you were and who you became.
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The China-Africa alliance
Africa is critically important to China’s global strategy, for a number of reasons: the continent’s geopolitical importance; its large, untapped market; and its abundance of natural resources. And as more Chinese companies feel the need to enter new markets and seek more resources, Africa will only see increased Chinese business and investment activity.
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Aviation facing strong headwinds, reshapes industry
Falling demand, collapsing yields, low consumer confidence and fears of a pandemic have thrust the aviation industry into survival mode. Airlines are expected to post losses of US$9 billion this year, with an unprecedented drop in revenue of 15 per cent, that will see industry revenues shrink by US$80 billion to US$448 billion.


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Governments have not done enough to address crisis
Governments around the world have not done enough to address the damaging effects of the global financial crisis triggered by the one-year old subprime credit crisis in the United States, economist Manu Bhaskaran says.

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Global crisis forces corporations to look beyond quarterly earnings
With the US economy in turmoil, Wal-Mart, the nation's leading retailer boasting more than 144 million customers per week, is taking on a new leadership role. In a country where about one person in three is considered obese and 47 million people are without healthcare, the company is taking a unique stand in educating both its consumers and suppliers.

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Will India still be a land of opportunity in the face of global economic slowdown?
As the economic downturn takes hold in the United States and Europe, the Indian government is frantically trying to keep its economy from stalling, while trying to calm the nerves of foreign investors following the Mumbai terror attacks.

A general election must be held by May, and the government had been hoping that the nation would be insulated from the problems of the global economy.

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Branding Africa
Think of Africa and you’re likely to conjure up images of warfare, drought and corruption. But Ruurd Brouwer, Africa Director of entrepreneurial development bank FMO in the Netherlands says that, in order to attract investment to the continent, we need to get rid of the sorts of images as depicted by aid agencies and instead replace them with pictures of successful African bankers driving Mercedes cars.


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The China Syndrome: understanding the Chinese economy
China’s economy is booming and many multinational companies are looking to tap the Asian giant’s potential. However, according to Peter Bowie, CEO of Deloitte China, foreigners wanting to do business with the Chinese appear to be ill prepared because their pre-conceived notions about China are simply outdated.
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Engaging with Africa: Can business leaders afford to ignore this continent?
After years of stagnation, Africa is finally experiencing economic growth. Are there opportunities in Africa which are not being recognised by the business community outside of Africa?
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Targetting Africa: The case for investment
Africa is so diverse, with its variety of countries and resources, that almost any type of business in the world could take advantage of the continent’s economic growth. That was the view of panellists at the INSEAD Leadership Summit 2008.

Simon Harford, West Africa head for private equity group Actis and INSEAD alumnus (‘94D) says “virtually any business that can talk to the consumer base of Africa is already growing at remarkable rates, 30 to 60 per cent year on year.”

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Europe as a power: Financial and economic challenges ahead
There has been so much 'hype' about the rise of the BRIC countries - Brazil, Russia, India and China - that one begins to wonder about Europe's relevance as an economic power. 'Is the European economy as relevant as it once was?' asks Alice Rivlin of The Brookings Institution.
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Is it over yet? Businessmen offer recession insight
These are indeed times that try men’s (and women’s) souls. But the way forward is not to cut back or sit on the sidelines. According to several businessmen attending INSEAD’s Leadership Summit Europe, you’ve got to keep one eye on the balance sheet, another on the horizon and be mindful of constant change as new circumstances will often hide opportunities in what appears to be trouble.


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Cathay Pacific takes off cautiously to brighter skies
At its Annual General Meeting recently, IATA (International Air Transport Association) predicted that the industry will recover faster than expected, with Asia-Pacific carriers powering the upturn. INSEAD Knowledge takes a closer look at the performance of one of these airlines: the flag carrier of Hong Kong, Cathay Pacific.


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The emerging markets: exploring the consequences
The rapid development of countries like China and India is a remarkable phenomenon, says Vince Cable, the UK’s Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills. “In a matter of one generation, China has broken through to a degree that took over a century in Britain. Solidly established precedents like South Korea show that this breakthrough can be sustained. It is clear that major so-called emerging markets have already emerged.”
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Coping with Copenhagen: the business implications
The Copenhagen Climate Summit (COP 15) began on December 7, 2009, on the heels of the pirating of the East Anglia University Climatic Research Unit's email exchanges, and calls of climate sceptics to re-examine the scientific basis for undertaking actions to limit greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions originating from human activity.
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Shining a light on China
With an economy that’s set to grow at around 10 per cent despite the financial crisis, labour costs among the lowest in the world and a huge untapped domestic market with pent-up consumer demand to match, China beckons every businessman with an eye on containing costs and expanding his reach. But, business person beware, cautions INSEAD Emeritus Professor of International Political Economy Jonathan Story, who has just written a new book, 'China Uncovered - What You Need to Know to Do Business
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A ‘naive response’ to economic growth?
With many economies expected to begin posting growth again this year, the group executive director and CEO of wholesale banking at Standard Chartered Bank has some words of caution: accepting GDP figures at face value “would be a naïve response”.


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China faces an economic crossroads
With the collapse of external demand in the wake of the global financial crisis, China needs to reduce its dependence on exports and investments, and shift towards internal private consumption, says Stephen Roach, a leading economist and Hong Kong-based chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia.
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Book review: The Indian Renaissance
Economics examiners must love China and India. What a perfect pair of rising economic Asian giants to use for a compare-and-contrast question for their students. A thousand years ago, both countries were civilised and technologically advanced while Europeans huddled in draughty castles and a gnawed meat off bones. Both countries missed out on the Industrial Revolution, and seemed bewildered by the rise of the barbarian West. But they succumbed to its domination, shook it off in the 1940s, then e
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Personal view: some advice to climate scientists on ethics from a finance professor
Climate scientists from the Climate Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia have come under fire for alleged data manipulation following the release of thousands of emails and documents. As a result of ‘ClimateGate,’ some of the climatologists involved have stepped aside or are under investigation by their university.
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