Learning outcomes

After studying this course you should be able to:

  • draw and interpret scale diagrams;

  • extract information from tables;

  • draw, interpret and compare pie charts, bar charts and frequency diagrams;

  • use and interpret coordinates;

  • plot points and draw graphs, using suitable axes and scales;

  • interpret and compare graphs.


Author(s): The Open University

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20.181 Computation for Biological Engineers (MIT)
This course covers the analytical, graphical, and numerical methods supporting the analysis and design of integrated biological systems. Topics include modularity and abstraction in biological systems, mathematical encoding of detailed physical problems, numerical methods for solving the dynamics of continuous and discrete chemical systems, statistics and probability in dynamic systems, applied local and global optimization, simple feedback and control analysis, statistics and probability in pat
Author(s): Alm, Eric,Endy, Andrew

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Sushi Monster App for iOS
'Meet Sushi Monster! Scholastic’s new game to practice, reinforce, and extend math fact fluency is completely engaging and appropriately challenging. Strengthen reasoning strategies for whole number addition and multiplication by helping monsters make a target sum or product. Earn points with each correct answer… but watch out for distractions! To be successful, plan ahead and strategically select numbers from the sushi counter. Meets Common Core State StandardsExtend fact
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2.6 Comparing measurements

In order to compare quantities, it is best to express them in the same units.

Example 10

Three children have just measured their own heights in metric units. Isaac says ‘My height is 1098’, Jasmine says ‘My height is 112’ and Kim says ‘Mine is 1.1’. What units were
Author(s): The Open University

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2.6 Summary of Section 2

The results of the visual attention experiments we have considered can be interpreted as follows.

  • Attention can be directed selectively towards different areas of the visual field, without the need to re-focus.

  • The inability to report much detail from brief, masked visual displays appears to be linked to the need to assemble the various information components.

  • The visual information is captured in parallel, but assemb
    Author(s): The Open University

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Physical and Chemical Change - Grade 10 [CAPS]
Free High School Science Texts Project

Some Rights Reserved

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Season's Greetings from Michigan State University
Enjoy this holiday greeting celebrating the work of more than half a million MSU Spartans who are a force for good—this season and all seasons. Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/spartans.msu Stay connected at MSUToday http://msutoday.msu.edu
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1.5.2 Try some yourself

1 When dividing by 1000, move the digits 3 places to the right (past the decimal point). Divide 202.15 by 1000. What is 202.15 metres in kilometres?

Answer

0.202 1
Author(s): The Open University

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Try some yourself

1 Calculate all the angles at the centres of these objects.

TPS Greece Trip 2010 Milsten
Vimeo is a respectful community of creative people who are passionate about sharing the videos they make. Use Vimeo if you want the best tools and highest quality video in the universe. Run time 05:10.
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TALAT Lecture 2402: Design Recommendations for fatigue loaded structures
This lecture presents calculation of design stresses for variable stress ratios in practice, explanation on the background of design recommendations; it demonstrates the concept of partial safety factors and supply appropriate background information for aluminium; it enables the designer to evaluate service behavior of structural details on a more sophisticated level applying the same principles as in current design recommendations; it provides understanding of the fatigue design procedure accor
Author(s): TALAT,Dimitris Kosteas, Technische Universität MÃ

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

3.4 The ‘flanker’ effect

A potential problem for the feature integration theory is the fact that the time taken to understand the meaning of a printed word can be influenced by other, nearby words. Of itself, this is not surprising, because it is well known that one word can prime (i.e. speed decisions to) another related word; the example nurse – doctor was given in Secti
Author(s): The Open University

Tectonic Plates and Plate Boundaries (WMS)
The earths crust is constantly in motion. Sections of the crust, called plates, push against each other due to forces from the molten interior of the earth. The areas where these plates collide often have increased volcanic and earthquake activity. These images show the locations of the plates and their boundaries in the earths crust. Convergent boundaries are areas where two plates are pushing against each other and one plate may be subducting under another. Divergent boundaries have two plates
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1 Technological advancement

Everything that can be invented has been invented.

(The Commissioner of the United States Office of Patents, 1899, recommending that his office be abolished, quoted in The Economist, 2000, p. 5)

There is nothing now to be foreseen which can prevent the United States from enjoying an era of business prosperity which is entirely
Author(s): The Open University

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2.3.1 Introduction

The data set in Table 7 (section 1.8) comprised non-numerical or categorical data. Such data often appear in newspaper reports and are usually represented as one or other of two types of graphical display, one type is called a pie chart and the other a bar chart; these are arguably the graphical displays most familiar to the general public, and are certainly ones that you will have seen before. Pie charts are discussed in section 2.2 and bar charts in section 2.4. Some problems
Author(s): The Open University

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Hubble Telescope Uses Algebra
NASA Connect Segment explaining the design and upkeep of the Hubble Space telescope. Also explains how algebra is used with the telescope. (01:54)
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2.4 Labelling lines

Sometimes you may want to refer to mathematical sentences or phrases further up your work. You can label such sentences and then refer back by label. Thus, Example 3 could be laid out as follows.

So, from (1) and (2),

Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After completing this unit you should be able to:

  • visualise problems using pictures and diagrams;

  • recognise patterns in a variety of different situations;

  • use a word formula to help solve a problem;

  • derive simple word formulas of your own, for example for use in a spreadsheet;

  • use doing and undoing diagrams to change formulas round;

  • solve problems involving direct and inverse proportion;

  • in
    Author(s): The Open University

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2D and 3D Wavefronts
Rory Adams, Free High School Science Texts Project, Mark Horner, Heather Williams


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3.17.1 Try some yourself

Evaluate each of the following and give an example from everyday life to illustrate the sum (e.g. Thomas's piggy bank).

  • (a) 4 − 2

  • (b) −3 − 5

<
Author(s): The Open University

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