Acknowledgements
What causes pain and how do we stop it? This unit looks at how the human body responds to the release of certain chemicals and as a result feels pain. Pain can be reduced by inhibiting the formation of such chemicals and you will learn how the molecular structure of aspirin has been formulated to help in this process.
Author(s): The Open University

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9 Summary
What causes pain and how do we stop it? This unit looks at how the human body responds to the release of certain chemicals and as a result feels pain. Pain can be reduced by inhibiting the formation of such chemicals and you will learn how the molecular structure of aspirin has been formulated to help in this process.
Author(s): The Open University

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6 How does aspirin relieve pain?
What causes pain and how do we stop it? This unit looks at how the human body responds to the release of certain chemicals and as a result feels pain. Pain can be reduced by inhibiting the formation of such chemicals and you will learn how the molecular structure of aspirin has been formulated to help in this process.
Author(s): The Open University

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5 Some chemistry involving esters
What causes pain and how do we stop it? This unit looks at how the human body responds to the release of certain chemicals and as a result feels pain. Pain can be reduced by inhibiting the formation of such chemicals and you will learn how the molecular structure of aspirin has been formulated to help in this process.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.1 Salicylic acid
What causes pain and how do we stop it? This unit looks at how the human body responds to the release of certain chemicals and as a result feels pain. Pain can be reduced by inhibiting the formation of such chemicals and you will learn how the molecular structure of aspirin has been formulated to help in this process.
Author(s): The Open University

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Next steps
What causes pain and how do we stop it? This unit looks at how the human body responds to the release of certain chemicals and as a result feels pain. Pain can be reduced by inhibiting the formation of such chemicals and you will learn how the molecular structure of aspirin has been formulated to help in this process.
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction
What causes pain and how do we stop it? This unit looks at how the human body responds to the release of certain chemicals and as a result feels pain. Pain can be reduced by inhibiting the formation of such chemicals and you will learn how the molecular structure of aspirin has been formulated to help in this process.
Author(s): The Open University

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Fourier series
This unit is concerned with the technique of expressing a periodic function as a sum of terms, where each term is a constant, a sine function or a cosine function. There is a strong analogy with the technique of expressing a (non-periodic) function as a Taylor series, which is a sum of terms that are powers of the independent variable(s); in both cases, working with just the first few terms generally gives a useful approximation. This unit assumes the following background knowledge: the definit
Author(s): The Open University

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5.3 Stanzas and verse

The poem ‘The literal and the metaphor’, which you read in Section 5.1, was divided into two sections. We call these verses or stanzas, and they are the poetic equivalent of paragraphs, but with more shape, weight and focus than the prose equivalent. Stanzas are like islands encircled by shores. Or, since we have been talking about houses, let's use another image for these stanzas. James Fenton tells us t
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Exercise sheet 4
Exercise sheet 4 - UNSPECIFIED Keywords:Exercise , Elementary Probability , random variable mgf , random variable pgf , Probability and Statistics
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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)
This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanato
Author(s): Gollub, Randy L.,Yendiki, Anastasia,Wald, Lawrence

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12.620J Classical Mechanics: A Computational Approach (MIT)
Classical mechanics in a computational framework. Lagrangian formulation. Action, variational principles. Hamilton's principle. Conserved quantities. Hamiltonian formulation. Surfaces of section. Chaos. Liouville's theorem and Poincar, integral invariants. Poincar,-Birkhoff and KAM theorems. Invariant curves. Cantori. Nonlinear resonances. Resonance overlap and transition to chaos. Properties of chaotic motion. Transport, diffusion, mixing. Symplectic integration. Adiabatic invariants. Many-dime
Author(s): Sussman, Gerald Jay,Wisdom, Jack

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5.069 Crystal Structure Analysis (MIT)
This course covers the following topics: X-ray diffraction: symmetry, space groups, geometry of diffraction, structure factors, phase problem, direct methods, Patterson methods, electron density maps, structure refinement, how to grow good crystals, powder methods, limits of X-ray diffraction methods, and structure data bases.

1.3 Nucleic acids and the flow of genetic information
This unit helps you understand the properties of nucleotides and how they contribute to secondary and tertiary structures of nucleic acids at the molecular level. You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and the use of ribozymes, aptamers, antisense and hybridization as tools in molecular research. The unit covers the function of DNA packaging within the cell, the interactions between the DNA double helix and the nu
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Nucleic acids: genetic, functional and structural roles in the cell
This unit helps you understand the properties of nucleotides and how they contribute to secondary and tertiary structures of nucleic acids at the molecular level. You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and the use of ribozymes, aptamers, antisense and hybridization as tools in molecular research. The unit covers the function of DNA packaging within the cell, the interactions between the DNA double helix and the nu
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

This unit looks at the role of innovation in the development of industries and considers how production costs change as sales increase and as new technology is introduced into the production process. It looks at the relation between consumer demand for a good and that good's price, and at how the relation between output and production costs in different markets can dramatically affect industry structure. In describing these issues, the unit introduces the range of activities that constitutes
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9.2 Absolute thresholds
Hearing is a familiar and important human sense that is a topic naturally of interest to those who are curious about human biology. This unit will enable you to relate what you read to your own sensory experiences – and indeed many of the questions asked have exactly that function. This unit will be best understood by those with some biological understanding.
Author(s): The Open University

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7.4 Summary of Section 7
Hearing is a familiar and important human sense that is a topic naturally of interest to those who are curious about human biology. This unit will enable you to relate what you read to your own sensory experiences – and indeed many of the questions asked have exactly that function. This unit will be best understood by those with some biological understanding.
Author(s): The Open University

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6.2 Number of neurons hypothesis
Hearing is a familiar and important human sense that is a topic naturally of interest to those who are curious about human biology. This unit will enable you to relate what you read to your own sensory experiences – and indeed many of the questions asked have exactly that function. This unit will be best understood by those with some biological understanding.
Author(s): The Open University

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6.1 Firing-rate hypothesis
Hearing is a familiar and important human sense that is a topic naturally of interest to those who are curious about human biology. This unit will enable you to relate what you read to your own sensory experiences – and indeed many of the questions asked have exactly that function. This unit will be best understood by those with some biological understanding.
Author(s): The Open University

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