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Make an Alarm!
After reading the story "Dear Mr. Henshaw" by Beverly Cleary, students will build an alarm system for something in the classroom, as the main character Leigh does to protect his lunchbox from thieves. Students will learn about alarms and use their creativity to create an alarm system to protect their lockers, desk, or classroom door. Note: this activity can also be done without reading "Dear Mr. Henshaw".
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

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Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Construct and Test Roofs for Different Climates
We design and create objects to make our lives easier and more comfortable. The houses in which we live are excellent examples of this. Depending on your local climate, the features of your house have been designed to satisfy your particular environmental needs: protection from hot, cold, windy and/or rainy weather. In this activity, students design and build model houses, then test them against various climate elements, and then re-design and improve them. Using books, websites and photos, stud
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

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Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

The Other Water Cycle
For students that have already been introduced to the water cycle this lesson is intended as a logical follow-up. Students will learn about human impacts on the water cycle that create a pathway for pollutants beginning with urban development and joining the natural water cycle as surface runoff. The extent of surface runoff in an area depends on the permeability of the materials in the ground. Permeability is the degree to which water or other liquids are able to flow through a material. Differ
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

What’s Hot and What’s Not?
With the help of simple, teacher-led demonstration activities, students learn the basic physics of heat transfer by means of conduction, convection, and radiation. They also learn about examples of heating and cooling devices, from stove tops to car radiators, that they encounter everyday in their homes, schools, and modes of transportation. Since in our everyday lives there are many times that we want to prevent heat transfer, students also consider ways that conduction, convection, and radiati
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Duke University, Pratt School of Engineering,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Energetic Musical Instruments
Students will learn to apply the principles and concepts associated with energy and the transfer of energy in an engineering context through the designing and making of a musical instrument. The students must choose from a variety of supplies presented to them to make an instrument capable of producing three different tones. After the accomplishment of the design, students must explain the energy transfer mechanism in sufficient detail and describe how they could make their instruments better.
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Duke University, Pratt School of Engineering,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Does Contact Area Matter?
Using the same method for measuring friction that was used in the previous lesson (Discovering Friction), students design and conduct an experiment to determine if the amount of area over which an object contacts a surface it is moving across affects the amount of friction encountered.
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Scaling the Map
Students will learn how to determine map distances and map areas using the map scale. They will also get a better feel for how much an area represents on the map in relation to the size they are suggesting for their cavern.
Author(s): Adventure Engineering,

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Copyright 2011 - Adventure Engineering, Colorado School of Mines,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Straining out the Dirt
In this activity, students build a water filter with activated carbon, cotton and other materials to remove chocolate powder from water.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Testing the Caverns (Optional)
This lesson provides a fun, activity-based closure to the Asteroid Impact unit. Students build model caverns using paper mache or clay and bury them in a tray of sand. Next, they test the models by dropping balls onto them to simulate an asteroid hitting the earth. By molding paper mache around a balloon to form a dome, or around a small cardboard box to form a rectangular structure, students will be able to build their caverns.
Author(s): Adventure Engineering,

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Copyright 2011 - Adventure Engineering, Colorado School of Mines,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

You’re a Pushover!
The purpose of this activity is to demonstrate Newton’s 3rd Law of Motion, which is the physical law that governs thrust in aircraft. The students will do several activities that show that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Master's student CuiCui Chen examines the future role of biofuels
Researchers from the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change describe their research and why it is important
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Master's student Paul Kishimoto makes complex climate and economic models user-friendly
Researchers from the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change describe their research and why it is important
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Part 3, "Behave!" Censoring Game Sex
Part 3,""Behave!" Censoring Game Sex" Depictions of sex have a long history of being controversial in any medium, and here we are going to take a look at, discuss, and even****play** some examples from the history of video games. How has this evolving medium depicted the sex act, both visually and interactively, and how has this been shaped by the rise of game rating systems, both in the U.S. and in other parts of the world? Why do some people find these games even more objectionable th
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Part 2, "Behave!" Censoring Game Sex
Part 2,""Behave!" Censoring Game Sex" Depictions of sex have a long history of being controversial in any medium, and here we are going to take a look at, discuss, and even****play** some examples from the history of video games. How has this evolving medium depicted the sex act, both visually and interactively, and how has this been shaped by the rise of game rating systems, both in the U.S. and in other parts of the world? Why do some people find these games even more objectionable th
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EVER '11: Pneu Scooter and RazEr rEVolution
Pneu Scooter and RazEr rEVolution cruising outside of the Grimaldi Forum in Monaco for the EVER '11 Conference and Exhibition on Ecological Vehicles and Renewable Energies. These are electric kick scooters with custom-built rear wheel hub motors.

More info:
scolton.blogspot.com
www.etotheipiplusone.net

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Part 1, "Behave!" Censoring Game Sex
Part 1,""Behave!" Censoring Game Sex" Depictions of sex have a long history of being controversial in any medium, and here we are going to take a look at, discuss, and even****play** some examples from the history of video games. How has this evolving medium depicted the sex act, both visually and interactively, and how has this been shaped by the rise of game rating systems, both in the U.S. and in other parts of the world? Why do some people find these games even more objectionable th
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"The Global Games - Challenges, Trends, & Innovation" - AECOM
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How old is the universe? (part 2)
Watch video of Vanderbilt Professor David A. Weintraub speaking March 30 on “How Old is the Universe?” as part of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. David A. Weintraub is professor of astronomy, director of the Communication of Science & Technology program, and director of Undergraduate Studies for Department of Physics & Astronomy at Vanderbilt University.keep reading »
Author(s): Vanderbilt News Service

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The Americas in the Age of Revolution, 1776-1836 (part 2)
Watch video of Marshall Eakin, professor of history at Vanderbilt University, speaking March 30 on ”The Americas in the Age of Revolution, 1776-1836,” as part of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. The revolution that created the United States was only one of many American revolutions. From 1776 to 1836, wars for independence erupted throughout the Americas—from Bostonkeep reading »
Author(s): Vanderbilt News Service

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Next Steps
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

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