Junior Geography - Quiz
How well do you know your Geography?
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General Knowledge - Quiz
General facts on world affairs.
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The Last Days Remembered: A Compatriot Recalls the Deaths of Sacco and Vanzetti in 1927
The emotional and highly publicized case of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti became a touchstone and rallying cry for American radicals. In 1920 the two Italian immigrants were accused of murder and although the evidence against them was flimsy, they were readily convicted, in large part because they were immigrants and anarchists. They were executed, despite international protests, on August 23, 1927. Aldino Felicani, printer and publisher of the anarchist paper Controcorrente, was a long-t
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4.7 Has telephone design changed over time?
This unit is for designers, engineers, technologists and anyone interested in designing and inventing. It is also for managers and consumers interested in innovation and technical change. The unit will show you how design and innovation can create a more sustainable future. It will also help you understand how innovation comes about and will encourage thinking about environmental and social challenges for the future.
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4.6 Was the telephone an immediate success?
This unit is for designers, engineers, technologists and anyone interested in designing and inventing. It is also for managers and consumers interested in innovation and technical change. The unit will show you how design and innovation can create a more sustainable future. It will also help you understand how innovation comes about and will encourage thinking about environmental and social challenges for the future.
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4.5 Was the telephone invented in response to a need or because of developments in technology?
This unit is for designers, engineers, technologists and anyone interested in designing and inventing. It is also for managers and consumers interested in innovation and technical change. The unit will show you how design and innovation can create a more sustainable future. It will also help you understand how innovation comes about and will encourage thinking about environmental and social challenges for the future.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.4 What was innovative about the telephone?
This unit is for designers, engineers, technologists and anyone interested in designing and inventing. It is also for managers and consumers interested in innovation and technical change. The unit will show you how design and innovation can create a more sustainable future. It will also help you understand how innovation comes about and will encourage thinking about environmental and social challenges for the future.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.3 Who invented the telephone?
This unit is for designers, engineers, technologists and anyone interested in designing and inventing. It is also for managers and consumers interested in innovation and technical change. The unit will show you how design and innovation can create a more sustainable future. It will also help you understand how innovation comes about and will encourage thinking about environmental and social challenges for the future.
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2.1 Anti-Semitism and Hitler
This unit explores the Holocaust, as the destruction of European Jewry is commonly known. The mass killing represented by the Holocaust raises many questions concerning the development of European civilisation during the twentieth century. This unit, therefore, covers essential ground if you wish to understand this development.
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5.6.1 Young adults

Activity 20

Look closely at Images 54 and 55. Can you identify the two features which distinguished a girl from a young woman in the Victorian and Edwardian period?

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5.5.4 Confirmation

Image 53 Photographer/Painter: Henry Knight, St Leonards on Sea. Subject: F.E. and Amynora Field, 1877.

You may find it difficult to read the verso text, so here it is for you.

The handwriting reads: F.E. Field aged 15; Amynora Field aged 11.
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5.5.3 Birthdays

Image 49 Photographer/Painter: Warwick Brookes, Manchester. Subject: Portrait of Max Witte.
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5.5.2 Skirts and breeching

Look carefully at Images 46, 47 and 48.

Image 46 Photographer/Painter: Hills & Saunders, Eton. Subject: Michael Cahne Seymour, 1871.
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5.5.1 Christening

Image 45 Photographer/Painter: James Pennington, Aigburth. Subject: Unknown woman and child, 1860s. Christening portrait.

The christening dress here identifies the occasion.

In the normal course of events, Victorian couples would produce their
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5.5 Rites of passage

Image 44 Photographer/Painter: Anon. Subject: William Arthur Brown, the son of James Brown standing in the doorway of Brown & Sons Studio, 148 Camberwell Road, London, c.1899.

Most portraits, however, were taken to celebrate rites of passage, su
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5.4 Special occasions

Image 43 Photographer/Painter: Warwick Brookes, Manchester. Subject: Helene Witte in her gown for a fancy dress ball.

Special occasions could include events of family, local or national significance. Those wealthy enough to attend important balls an
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5.3 Prized possessions

Image 42 Photographer/Painter: Hawkins, York. Subject: Details unknown.

Prized possessions also feature in the family album. Family pets, cats and dogs were frequently taken to be photographed in the studio and often appear in portraits taken outside
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5.2 Records of achievement

Image 41 Photographer/Painter: Thomas Miller, Wellingborough. Subject: Male wearing mortar board, c.1880.

The Victorian family album validated success. In keeping with the theme of idealization, our ancestors courted the camera to commemorate events
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5.1 Capturing commemorative events

This section explores the events commemorated in photographs.

Activity 19

Begin by listing the occasions when we choose to use our cameras today. It might help to think back over the times when you have used your camera i
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4.12 Key concepts

We can conclude that the ideas relating to idealization, positive characterization and sexual stereotyping had a significant influence on the treatment of all 4 components of the portrait: expression, pose, background accessories and lighting.

Victorian family photographs (like most other primary sources) are therefore selective, partial and biased. Early photographers regarded it as part of their proper function to emphasize those aspects that were considered at the time to be good and
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